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[PMID]: 29464286
[Au] Autor:Chatzigianni A; Kyprianou C; Papadopoulos MA; Sidiropoulou S
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthodontics, School of Dentistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece. chatzigianni.athina@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Dentoalveloäre Merkmale bei Kindern mit juveniler idiopathischer Arthritis. Dentoalveolar characteristics in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis.
[So] Source:J Orofac Orthop;79(2):133-139, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1615-6714
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) is an autoimmune disease with multiple potential causal factors. In case of temporomandibular joint (TMJ) affection, the inflammatory reaction can result in restricted mandibular growth with implied skeletal and facial deformities. Aim of the present study was to examine dentoalveolar and occlusion characteristics in children with JIA. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The sample consisted of 66 children (27 boys, 39 girls) with JIA. Thirty-three of them showed unilateral or bilateral condylar destruction, while the other half did not manifest any TMJ involvement. Corresponding dental casts of these patients were evaluated and Angle classification, overjet, overbite, crossbite, crowding, and ectopic teeth were registered. All dental casts were subsequently scanned and digitized to analyze 26 additional variables. Subgroups according to sex and condylar affection were formed. Statistical analysis was performed using Fisher's least significant difference (LSD) post hoc test of analysis of variance (ANOVA). RESULTS: The prevalence of Class II, division 1 malocclusion in this JIA sample was high (28.8%). Compared to girls, boys had significantly greater dental arch widths and lengths. The group with bilateral condylar affection had significantly decreased lower arch length and increased irregularity index (p < 0.035) compared to the non-affected group. CONCLUSIONS: Bilateral condylar involvement in children with JIA seems to reduce the lower arch length, while increasing the irregularity index of the lower front teeth.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00056-018-0121-9

  2 / 2202 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29237013
[Au] Autor:Bock NC; Saffar M; Hudel H; Evälahti M; Heikinheimo K; Rice DP; Ruf S
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthodontics, University of Giessen, Giessen, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Outcome quality and long-term (≥15 years) stability after Class II:2 Herbst-multibracket appliance treatment in comparison to untreated Class I controls.
[So] Source:Eur J Orthod;, 2017 Dec 09.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2210
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aim: To investigate the outcome quality and the long-term (≥15 years) post-treatment (Tx) changes after Class II:2 Herbst-multibracket appliance (MBA) Tx. Subjects and Methods: In this longitudinal observational study, a recall of Class II:2 patients who had been treated by a Herbst-MBA during adolescence was conducted. Study models from before and after active Tx, after retention and after recall were assessed using standard occlusal variables and the peer assessment rating index (PAR). These data were compared to historical untreated Class I controls. Results: Twenty out of 33 patients (61%) could be located and participated at age 33.9 ± 2.7 years. When comparing their data to the 13 patients who did not participate, the pre- and post-Tx occlusal findings did not differ systematically; however, the PAR scores of the non-participants were by 3.3-8.2 points higher at all times and the non-participants were 2.1-2.5 years older. Pre-Tx at age 14.4 ± 2.7 years, the participants showed the following mean values: PAR = 15.0 ± 7.0, Class II molar relationship (MR) = 0.8 ± 0.3 cusp widths (cw), overbite = 5.3 ± 1.3 mm. After Tx, a PAR score of 2.9 ± 1.3 and a super Class I MR (-0.1 ± 0.1 cw) with normal overbite (1.2 ± 0.8 mm) existed. At recall, a PAR score increase to 5.9 ± 3.6 points had occurred, mainly caused by an increase of overbite to 2.5 ± 1.5 mm. The average MR remained Class I (0.0 ± 0.2 cw). For all variables, the untreated controls exhibited similar findings. Conclusion: The occlusal outcome of Class II:2 Herbst-MBA Tx exhibited very good long-term stability. While mild post-Tx changes occurred, the long-term findings are similar to untreated Class I controls.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/ejo/cjx091

  3 / 2202 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29198303
[Au] Autor:Minagi HO; Okuno K; Nohara K; Sakai T
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral-facial Disorders, Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, Osaka, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Predictors of Side Effects With Long-Term Oral Appliance Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea.
[So] Source:J Clin Sleep Med;14(1):119-125, 2018 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1550-9397
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:STUDY OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the predictors of dental changes associated with long-term treatment with oral appliances (OAs) in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). METHODS: This was a retrospective study to investigate Japanese patients with OSA receiving long-term treatment with OAs. Comparisons of cephalometric analysis were carried out between the initial and follow-up assessments of dental and skeletal changes. Based on dental changes, predictors that may cause side effects were investigated. RESULTS: A total of 64 patients (average age at start of treatment: 57.7 ± 14.2 years, 44 males) were included in this study. The average duration of treatment was 4.3 ± 2.1 years. Over the total treatment period, there was a significant reduction in overjet (OJ) (1.5 ± 1.3 mm) and overbite (0.90 ± 1.5 mm), and an increase in the lower incisor line to the mandibular plane (3.1 ± 5.4°). A larger reduction in OJ of ≥ 1 mm was associated with treatment duration, use frequency, and mandibular advancement of the OAs. In addition to these predictive factors, the number of teeth was correlated with the amount of OJ reduction. CONCLUSIONS: For long-term treatment with OAs, the risk of dental side effects should be considered, such as a reduction in OJ. A small number of maxillary teeth, as well as the factors associated with OAs, including treatment duration, use frequency, and mandibular advancement of the OAs, was correlated with an increased rate of OJ reduction. COMMENTARY: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 7.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.5664/jcsm.6896

  4 / 2202 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390172
[Au] Autor:Millett DT; Cunningham SJ; O'Brien KD; Benson PE; de Oliveira CM
[Ad] Address:Oral Health and Development, Cork University Dental School and Hospital, University College, Cork, Ireland.
[Ti] Title:Orthodontic treatment for deep bite and retroclined upper front teeth in children.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;2:CD005972, 2018 02 01.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: A Class II division 2 malocclusion is characterised by upper front teeth that are retroclined (tilted toward the roof of the mouth) and an increased overbite (deep overbite), which can cause oral problems and may affect appearance.This problem can be corrected by the use of special dental braces (functional appliances) that move the upper front teeth forward and change the growth of the upper or lower jaws, or both. Most types of functional appliances are removable and this treatment approach does not usually require extraction of any permanent teeth. Additional treatment with fixed braces may be necessary to ensure the best result.An alternative approach is to provide space for the correction of the front teeth by moving the molar teeth backwards. This is done by applying a force to the teeth from the back of the head using a head brace (headgear) and transmitting this force to part of a fixed or removable dental brace that is attached to the back teeth. The treatment may be carried out with or without extraction of permanent teeth.If headgear use is not feasible, the back teeth may be held in place by bands connected to a fixed bar placed across the roof of the mouth or in contact with the front of the roof of the mouth. This treatment usually requires two permanent teeth to be taken out from the middle of the upper arch (one on each side). OBJECTIVES: To establish whether orthodontic treatment that does not involve extraction of permanent teeth produces a result that is any different from no orthodontic treatment or orthodontic treatment involving extraction of permanent teeth, in children with a Class II division 2 malocclusion. SEARCH METHODS: Cochrane Oral Health's Information Specialist searched the following electronic databases: Cochrane Oral Health's Trials Register (to 13 November 2017), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (the Cochrane Library, 2017, Issue 10), MEDLINE Ovid (1946 to 13 November 2017), and Embase Ovid (1980 to 13 November 2017). To identify any unpublished or ongoing trials, the US National Institutes of Health Ongoing Trials Register (ClinicalTrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (apps.who.int/trialsearch) were searched. We also contacted international researchers who were likely to be involved in any Class II division 2 clinical trials. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and controlled clinical trials (CCTs) of orthodontic treatments to correct deep bite and retroclined upper front teeth in children. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Two review authors independently screened the search results to find eligible studies, and would have extracted data and assessed the risk of bias from any included trials. We had planned to use random-effects meta-analysis; to express effect estimates as mean differences for continuous outcomes and risk ratios for dichotomous outcomes, with 95% confidence intervals; and to investigate any clinical or methodological heterogeneity. MAIN RESULTS: We did not identify any RCTs or CCTs that assessed the treatment of Class II division 2 malocclusion in children. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There is no evidence from clinical trials to recommend or discourage any type of orthodontic treatment to correct Class II division 2 malocclusion in children. This situation seems unlikely to change as trials to evaluate the best management of Class II division 2 malocclusion are challenging to design and conduct due to low prevalence, difficulties with recruitment and ethical issues with randomisation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD005972.pub4

  5 / 2202 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29509347
[Au] Autor:Endo S; Yamada W; Shundo I; Kobayashi Y; Komatsuzakit A; Endo T
[Ti] Title:Short-term treatment effects of the quad-helix appliance on dentofacial morphology of hyperdivergent patients.
[So] Source:Aust Orthod J;32(2):211-220, 2016 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:0587-3908
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of shor-term expansion treatment using the quad-helix appliance on dentofacial morphology in orthodontic patients presenting with a hyperdivergent facial pattern. METHODS: The treatment group consisted of 40 patients with a hyperdivergent facial pattern, who were treated for maxillary incisor crowding with a quad-helix appliance during the mixed dentition period. Lateral cephalograms taken at the start (TO) and end (TI) of the treatment were obtained as a course of care. A similar number of patients, who possessed the same type of facial pattern and who remained untreated, were assigned to a control group. Two consecutive lateral cephalograms of each untreated patient were taken at the same time points as TO and T1. All cephalograms were traced, analysed and compared between the two groups. RESULTS: The treatment changes as a result of the quad-helix appliance were expressed in an upward rotation of the mandible [2.34°] and distal tipping and impeded mesial movement of the maxillary first molars. Significant differences were evident between the treatment and control groups. CONCLUSION: Quad-helix appliance treatment can be appropriate for significantly decreasing the mandibular plane angle in hyperdivergent patients presenting with moderate maxillary incisor crowding and a positive overjet and overbite.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 2202 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29509023
[Au] Autor:Rebong RE; Stewart KT; Utreja A; Ghoneima AA
[Ti] Title:Accuracy of three-dimensional dental resin models created by fused deposition modeling, stereolithography, and Polyjet prototype technologies: .
[So] Source:Angle Orthod;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1945-7103
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to assess the dimensional accuracy of fused deposition modeling (FDM)-, Polyjet-, and stereolithography (SLA)-produced models by comparing them to traditional plaster casts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 12 maxillary and mandibular posttreatment orthodontic plaster casts were selected from the archives of the Orthodontic Department at the Indiana University School of Dentistry. Plaster models were scanned, saved as stereolithography files, and printed as physical models using three different three-dimensional (3D) printers: Makerbot Replicator (FDM), 3D Systems SLA 6000 (SLA), and Objet Eden500V (Polyjet). A digital caliper was used to obtain measurements on the original plaster models as well as on the printed resin models. RESULTS: Comparison between the 3D printed models and the plaster casts showed no statistically significant differences in most of the parameters. However, FDM was significantly higher on average than were plaster casts in maxillary left mixed plane (MxL-MP) and mandibular intermolar width (Md-IMW). Polyjet was significantly higher on average than were plaster casts in maxillary intercanine width (Mx-ICW), mandibular intercanine width (Md-ICW), and mandibular left mixed plane (MdL-MP). Polyjet was significantly lower on average than were plaster casts in maxillary right vertical plane (MxR-vertical), maxillary left vertical plane (MxL-vertical), mandibular right anteroposterior plane (MdR-AP), mandibular right vertical plane (MdR-vertical), and mandibular left vertical plane (MdL-vertical). SLA was significantly higher on average than were plaster casts in MxL-MP, Md-ICW, and overbite. SLA was significantly lower on average than were plaster casts in MdR-vertical and MdL-vertical. CONCLUSIONS: Dental models reconstructed by FDM technology had the fewest dimensional measurement differences compared to plaster models.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2319/071117-460.1

  7 / 2202 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29501116
[Au] Autor:Yun-Chia Ku M; Lo LJ; Chen MC; Wen-Ching Ko E
[Ad] Address:Department of Craniofacial Orthodontics, Craniofacial Research Center, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan, ROC.
[Ti] Title:Predicting need for orthognathic surgery in early permanent dentition patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate using receiver operating characteristic analysis.
[So] Source:Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop;153(3):405-414, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6752
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The purpose of this study was to predict the need for orthognathic surgery in patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP) in the early permanent dentition. METHODS: In this retrospective cohort study, we included 61 patients with complete UCLP (36 male, 25 female; mean age, 18.47 years; range, 16.92-26.17 years). The subjects were grouped into an orthognathic surgery group and a nonsurgery group at the time of growth completion. Lateral cephalograms obtained at the age of 11 years were analyzed to compare the 2 groups. The receiver operating characteristic analysis was applied to predict the probability of the need for orthognathic surgery in early adulthood by using the measurements obtained at the age of 11 years. RESULTS: SNB, ANB, SN, overbite, overjet, maxillary length, mandibular body length, and L1-MP were found to be significantly different between the 2 groups. For a person with a score of 2 in the 3-variable-based criteria, the sensitivity and specificity for determining the need for surgical treatment were 90.0% and 83.9%, respectively (ANB, ≤-0.45°; overjet, ≤-2.00 mm; maxillary length, ≤47.25 mm). CONCLUSIONS: Three cephalometric variables, the minimum number of discriminators required to obtain the optimum discriminant effectiveness, predicted the future need for orthognathic surgery with an accuracy of 86.9% in patients with UCLP.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180304
[Lr] Last revision date:180304
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 2202 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29480361
[Au] Autor:Jo SY; Lee SM; Lee KH; Kim DK
[Ad] Address:Institute of New Frontier Research, Hallym University College of Medicine, Chuncheon, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Effect of long-term oral appliance therapy on obstruction pattern in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.
[So] Source:Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol;, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1434-4726
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Oral appliance therapy is an alternative treatment modality for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, there have been no studies to determine whether changes in the obstructive pattern occur following long-term use of oral devices. Therefore, we examined whether the obstructive pattern changes in patients with OSA who undergo long-term oral appliance therapy using drug-induced sleep endoscopy (DISE). METHODS: We investigated 156 consecutive patients diagnosed with OSA. Seventy-nine of these patients were found to be eligible for inclusion in this study. All enrolled patients underwent two DISE examinations: before and after oral appliance use. We compared the DISE findings for each patient in terms of degree and configuration of airway obstruction at the levels of the velum, oropharynx, tongue base, and epiglottis. RESULTS: We found that dental problems, as assessed using the average values of overjet and overbite, were significantly decreased after 2 years of oral appliance use. Comparisons of the DISE findings revealed that there was significant widening of the upper airway structures following long-term oral appliance therapy, especially in the velum (P = 0.022) and epiglottis (P = 0.001). However, changes in the configuration of upper airway obstruction were not observed in any of the structures of the upper airway. CONCLUSIONS: We found evidence possibly indicating decreased obstruction at the levels of the velum and epiglottis after long-term use of oral appliances. We suggest further cohort studies to confirm these findings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00405-018-4909-4

  9 / 2202 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390986
[Au] Autor:Gudipaneni RK; Aldahmeshi RF; Patil SR; Alam MK
[Ad] Address:Department of Pedodontics, College of Dentistry, Aljouf University, Sakaka, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. dr.ravi.gudipaneni@jodent.org.
[Ti] Title:The prevalence of malocclusion and the need for orthodontic treatment among adolescents in the northern border region of Saudi Arabia: an epidemiological study.
[So] Source:BMC Oral Health;18(1):16, 2018 02 02.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6831
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: To assess the prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need among adolescents using the dental health component (DHC) of the index of orthodontic treatment need (IOTN). METHODS: A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 500 (mean age 16.25 ± 1.09) adolescents randomly selected from the northern border region of Saudi Arabia (KSA). The northern border region is sub-divided into three governorates: Ar'ar (186), Rafha (142) and Turayf (172). The data were recorded in questionnaires to assess the prevalence of malocclusion and estimate of DHC of the IOTN index. RESULTS: The most common malocclusions in order of prevalence were Angle's Class I (52.8%), Angle's Class II (31.8%), Angle's Class III (15.4%), crowding (47.2%), excessive overjet (> 2 mm) (22.2%), reduced overjet (< 1 mm) (11.4%), excessive overbite (> 2 mm) (23.4%), reduced overbite (< 1 mm) (12.2%), anterior crossbite (4.8%), posterior crossbite (9.4%) and open bite (4.6%). The most common facial profiles determined in the sagittal plane, were the straight facial profile (49.2%), convex (42.6%) and concave (8.2%). The prevalence of Grade 1 and 2 DHC was 49.4%, Grade 3 was 29.6%, Grade 4 and 5 was 21%. The grades of DHC of IOTN index were as follows: 48.73% of males and 50.22% of females showed grades 1 and 2. Grade 3 was observed in 30.32% of males and 28.69% of females. Grades 4 and 5 were recorded in 20.93% of males and 21.07% of females. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of malocclusion and orthodontic treatment need among the north border region of KSA is comparable with that of other regional studies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180218
[Lr] Last revision date:180218
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12903-018-0476-8

  10 / 2202 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29314803
[Au] Autor:Pavlovic J; Tabakovic SZ; Simic S; Vujacic A; Vukicevic V
[Ti] Title:Orthodontic-surgical treatment of four impacted canines in an adult patient: A case report.
[So] Source:Vojnosanit Pregl;73(7):682-5, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:0042-8450
[Cp] Country of publication:Serbia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: Full impaction of canines, in both jaws, is a rare phenomenon. It is usually coupled with the persistence of deciduous canines, or any other irregularity in the dental arch. Case report: Panoramic radiograph of a 24-year-old female patient showed bilateral canine impaction in both jaws. Due to vestibular, apical and medial position of canines in the upper jaw, the surgical approach implied the apically positioned flap technique. The position of impacted mandibular canines was vertical with more coronal position relative to the upper canines, thus requiring a closed eruption technique. Conclusion: Inadequate position of impacted canines in the bone fully justifies the use of orthodontic-surgical treatment.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cuspid/surgery
Diastema/therapy
Orthodontic Brackets
Overbite/therapy
Tooth, Impacted/surgery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cuspid/diagnostic imaging
Female
Humans
Overbite/complications
Radiography, Panoramic
Tooth, Impacted/complications
Tooth, Impacted/diagnostic imaging
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180110
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2298/VSP140401009P


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