Database : MEDLINE
Search on : pellagra [Words]
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[PMID]: 29477227
[Au] Autor:Kirkland JB; Meyer-Ficca ML
[Ad] Address:Department of Human Health and Nutritional Sciences, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Niacin.
[So] Source:Adv Food Nutr Res;83:83-149, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1043-4526
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nicotinic acid and nicotinamide, collectively referred to as niacin, are nutritional precursors of the bioactive molecules nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP). NAD and NADP are important cofactors for most cellular redox reactions, and as such are essential to maintain cellular metabolism and respiration. NAD also serves as a cosubstrate for a large number of ADP-ribosylation enzymes with varied functions. Among the NAD-consuming enzymes identified to date are important genetic and epigenetic regulators, e.g., poly(ADP-ribose)polymerases and sirtuins. There is rapidly growing knowledge of the close connection between dietary niacin intake, NAD(P) availability, and the activity of NAD(P)-dependent epigenetic regulator enzymes. It points to an exciting role of dietary niacin intake as a central regulator of physiological processes, e.g., maintenance of genetic stability, and of epigenetic control mechanisms modulating metabolism and aging. Insight into the role of niacin and various NAD-related diseases ranging from cancer, aging, and metabolic diseases to cardiovascular problems has shifted our view of niacin as a vitamin to current views that explore its potential as a therapeutic.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29463112
[Au] Autor:Loria A; Arroyo P; Fernandez V; Pardio J; Laviada H
[Ad] Address:a Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán , Ciudad de México , México.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence of obesity and diabetes in the socioeconomic transition of rural Mayas of Yucatan from 1962 to 2000.
[So] Source:Ethn Health;:1-7, 2018 Feb 20.
[Is] ISSN:1465-3419
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The Mayas of the State of Yucatan in Mexico are the only aboriginal group with obesity and diabetes data before 1997. OBJECTIVE: To analyze socioeconomic trends associated with the increase in obesity and diabetes seen in rural Yucatan from 1962 to 2000. METHODS: Body weight, height and venous Fasting Blood Glucose (FBG) were measured in 263 rural Maya adults participating in a 2000 nutrition survey. RESULTS: Diabetes (FBG > 125 mg/dL) and obesity (BMI ≥ 30 kg/m ) were 10.6% and 35.7%, respectively. These results contrast with those of a 1962 survey where diabetic prevalence was 2.3% and 0% in women and men respectively, with widespread adult pellagra and malnutrition. An important socioeconomic transition that took place in Yucatan during this lapse appeared to be associated to the obesity and diabetes increase. CONCLUSIONS: Rural Yucatan evolved from malnutrition conditions to high prevalence of obesity and diabetes in less than 40 years. This change was associated with the transition from an agroindustry-based economy, characterized by high-energy expenditure and low protein intake, to lower energy requirements of a Government-subsidized economy with larger food supply.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/13557858.2018.1442560

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[PMID]: 29439479
[Au] Autor:Ogawa Y; Kinoshita M; Shimada S; Kawamura T
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Yamanashi 409-3898, Japan. yogawa@yamanashi.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Zinc and Skin Disorders.
[So] Source:Nutrients;10(2), 2018 Feb 11.
[Is] ISSN:2072-6643
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The skin is the third most zinc (Zn)-abundant tissue in the body. The skin consists of the epidermis, dermis, and subcutaneous tissue, and each fraction is composed of various types of cells. Firstly, we review the physiological functions of Zn and Zn transporters in these cells. Several human disorders accompanied with skin manifestations are caused by mutations or dysregulation in Zn transporters; acrodermatitis enteropathica (Zrt-, Irt-like protein (ZIP)4 in the intestinal epithelium and possibly epidermal basal keratinocytes), the spondylocheiro dysplastic form of Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (ZIP13 in the dermal fibroblasts), transient neonatal Zn deficiency (Zn transporter (ZnT)2 in the secretory vesicles of mammary glands), and epidermodysplasia verruciformis (ZnT1 in the epidermal keratinocytes). Additionally, acquired Zn deficiency is deeply involved in the development of some diseases related to nutritional deficiencies (acquired acrodermatitis enteropathica, necrolytic migratory erythema, pellagra, and biotin deficiency), alopecia, and delayed wound healing. Therefore, it is important to associate the existence of mutations or dysregulation in Zn transporters and Zn deficiency with skin manifestations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29174751
[Au] Autor:de Oliveira Alves A; Bortolato T; Bernardes Filho F
[Ad] Address:Medical School, Centro Universitário Barão de Mauá, Ribeirão Preto, São Paulo, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Pellagra.
[So] Source:J Emerg Med;54(2):238-240, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:0736-4679
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180211
[Lr] Last revision date:180211
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29364456
[Au] Autor:Hui S; Heng L; Shaodong W; Fangyu W; Zhenkai W
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Jinling Hospital, China.
[Ti] Title:Pellagra affecting a patient with Crohn's disease.
[So] Source:An Bras Dermatol;92(6):879-881, 2017 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1806-4841
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pellagra is a nutritional disease caused by a deficiency of niacin. It may lead to death if not identified and treated timely. We review the literature and report a female patient presented with clinical features of pellagra as a complication of Crohn's disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180202
[Lr] Last revision date:180202
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 843 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29238837
[Au] Autor:Jayakumar KL; Micheletti RG
[Ad] Address:Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia.
[Ti] Title:Joseph Goldberger-Public Health Champion and Investigator of Pellagra.
[So] Source:JAMA Dermatol;153(12):1262, 2017 Dec 01.
[Is] ISSN:2168-6084
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171214
[Lr] Last revision date:171214
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamadermatol.2017.4044

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[PMID]: 29198404
[Au] Autor:Klaus HD
[Ad] Address:Department of Sociology and Anthropology, George Mason University, United States; Museo Nacional Sicán, Peru; Museo Nacional de Arqueología y Etnografía Hans Heinrich Brüning de Lambayeque, Peru. Electronic address: hklaus@gmu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Paleopathological rigor and differential diagnosis: Case studies involving terminology, description, and diagnostic frameworks for scurvy in skeletal remains.
[So] Source:Int J Paleopathol;19:96-110, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1879-9825
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Diverse pathological processes can produce overlapping or even indistinguishable patterns of abnormal bone formation or destruction, representing a fundamental challenge in the understanding of ancient diseases. This paper discusses increasing rigor in differential diagnosis through the paleopathological study of scurvy. First, paleopathology's use of descriptive terminology can strive to more thoroughly incorporate international standards of anatomical terminology. Second, improved observation and description of abnormal skeletal features can help distinguish between anemia or vitamin C deficiency. Third, use of a structured rubric can assist in establishing a more systematic, replicable, and precise decision-making process in differential diagnosis. These issues are illustrated in the study of two new cases of suspected scurvy from northern Peru. From this, it appears possible that ectocranial vascular impressions may further examined as a morphological marker of scurvy in the skeleton. Also, increased paleopathological attention to pellagra is long overdue, especially as it may produce generally comparable lesions to scurvy. This paper reflexively speaks to the process of paleopathological problem solving and the epistemology of our discipline-particularly regarding the ways in which we can continuously improve description and the construction of diagnostic arguments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171204
[Lr] Last revision date:171204
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 843 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29192472
[Au] Autor:Milanesi N; Gola M; Francalanci S
[Ad] Address:Allergological and Occupational Dermatology Unit, Department of Surgery and Translational Medicine, University of Florence, Florence, Italy - teinomila@tin.it.
[Ti] Title:Photosensitivity in drug induced pellagra.
[So] Source:G Ital Dermatol Venereol;, 2017 Nov 30.
[Is] ISSN:1827-1820
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171201
[Lr] Last revision date:171201
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.23736/S0392-0488.17.05776-5

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[PMID]: 28736097
[Au] Autor:Luthe SK; Sato R
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesia, Urasoe General Hospital, Okinawa, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Alcoholic Pellagra as a Cause of Altered Mental Status in the Emergency Department.
[So] Source:J Emerg Med;53(4):554-557, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:0736-4679
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Pellagra, which is caused by a deficiency of niacin and tryptophan, the precursor of niacin, is a rare disease in developed countries where alcoholism is a major risk factor due to malnutrition and lack of B vitamins. Although pellagra involves treatable dementia and psychosis, it is often underdiagnosed, especially in developed countries. CASE REPORT: In Japan, a 37-year-old man presented to the emergency department with altered mental status and seizures. Wernicke encephalopathy and alcohol withdrawal were suspected. The patient was treated with multivitamins, which did not include nicotinic acid amide, and oral diazepam. Despite medical treatment, his cognitive impairment progressively worsened, and eventually, pellagra was suspected. His response to treatment with nicotinic acid amide was substantial, and he was discharged without any long-term sequelae. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Despite the treatable dementia and psychosis, pellagra is often underdiagnosed, especially in developed countries and alcoholic patients. Pellagra should be routinely suspected in alcoholic patients because the response to appropriate treatment is typically dramatic.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 171028
[Lr] Last revision date:171028
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 843 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28611625
[Au] Autor:Srisuwanwattana P; Vachiramon V
[Ad] Address:Division of Dermatology, Faculty of Medicine, Ramathibodi Hospital, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand.
[Ti] Title:Necrolytic Acral Erythema in Seronegative Hepatitis C.
[So] Source:Case Rep Dermatol;9(1):69-73, 2017 Jan-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1662-6567
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Necrolytic acral erythema (NAE) is a distinctive skin disorder. The exact cause and pathogenesis is still unclear. Most studies report an association of NAE with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. We report a 64-year-old woman who presented with chronic mildly pruritic brownish to erythematous rashes on both lateral malleoli for 7 months. The clinical and histopathological findings were compatible with NAE. However, the serologic marker for HCV was negative.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170714
[Lr] Last revision date:170714
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1159/000458406


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