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[PMID]: 29496808
[Au] Autor:Marlow AK; Hamada Y; Maupome G; Eckert GJ; John V
[Ad] Address:Dr. Marlow is in private practice in Florence, KY; this study was conducted while she was a resident, Department of Periodontics and Allied Dental Program, Indiana University School of Dentistry; Dr. Hamada is Clinical Assistant Professor, Department of Periodontics and Allied Dental Program, Indian
[Ti] Title:Periodontal Diagnosis and Treatment Planning Among Indiana Dental Faculty, Periodontists, and General Practice Dentists: A Multi-Group Comparison.
[So] Source:J Dent Educ;82(3):291-298, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1930-7837
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Diagnosis and treatment planning for periodontal disease are fraught with challenges because of the complex and multifactorial nature of the disease as well as the inherent variability in interpretation of clinical findings. It is important for all practitioners to be accurate and consistent in formulating diagnoses based on the American Academy of Periodontology classification guidelines and to implement treatment plans to adequately address patients' needs. The aim of this study was to compare diagnoses and treatment plans among four groups of participants: full-time and part-time periodontology faculty at Indiana University School of Dentistry (IUSD), full-time and part-time IUSD general practice faculty, full-time periodontists in private practice, and full-time general practitioners in private practice. The study, conducted September 2016 to February 2017, also sought to determine if the calibrated participants had more correct diagnoses and treatment plans than those who had not received calibration training. Each of the four groups had 20 participants each. Participants evaluated ten de-identified case records and selected a diagnosis and treatment plan for each case. In the results, the 20 IUSD periodontal faculty members, most of whom had participated in calibration sessions, had overall better agreement and more correct responses for diagnoses and treatment plans than the IUSD general practice faculty members, private practice general practitioners, and private practice periodontists (only one of those 60 participants had participated in calibration sessions). The results supported the notion that periodic calibration is needed to standardize faculty criteria, facilitate better agreement and accuracy, and enhance consistency in the use of clinical criteria during training for dental students and in practice.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Dentists
Faculty, Dental
Patient Care Planning
Periodontal Diseases/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Dentists/statistics & numerical data
Faculty, Dental/statistics & numerical data
Health Services Needs and Demand
Humans
Indiana
Periodontal Diseases/therapy
Schools, Dental
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180303
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.21815/JDE.018.029

  2 / 33783 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29409815
[Au] Autor:Vander Haar EL; So J; Gyamfi-Bannerman C; Han YW
[Ad] Address:Division of Maternal Fetal Medicine, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, NY, USA.
[Ti] Title:Fusobacterium nucleatum and adverse pregnancy outcomes: Epidemiological and mechanistic evidence.
[So] Source:Anaerobe;50:55-59, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1095-8274
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Fusobacterium nucleatum is a Gram-negative anaerobic oral commensal associated with periodontal disease. F. nucleatum has been implicated in a wide spectrum of systemic diseases, including oral, gastro-intestinal, rheumatologic, and vascular pathologies. As pregnancy risk has been linked to periodontal disease, there has also been significant research into the effects of periodontal disease on adverse pregnancy outcomes. This article reviews the epidemiological and mechanistic evidence of the role of F. nucleatum in adverse pregnancy outcomes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29408884
[Au] Autor:García-Villaescusa A; Morales-Tatay JM; Monleón-Salvadó D; González-Darder JM; Bellot-Arcis C; Montiel-Company JM; Almerich-Silla JM
[Ad] Address:Departament d'Estomatologia, Facultad de Medicina y Odontología, Universitat de València, Valencia, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Using NMR in saliva to identify possible biomarkers of glioblastoma and chronic periodontitis.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0188710, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nowadays there is increasing interest in identifying-and using-metabolites that can be employed as biomarkers for diagnosing, treating and monitoring diseases. Saliva and NMR have been widely used for this purpose as they are fast and inexpensive methods. This case-control study aimed to find biomarkers that could be related to glioblastoma (GBL) and periodontal disease (PD) and studied a possible association between GBL and periodontal status. The participants numbered 130, of whom 10 were diagnosed with GBL and were assigned to the cases group, while the remaining 120 did not present any pathology and were assigned to the control group. On one hand, significantly increased (p < 0.05) metabolites were found in GBL group: leucine, valine, isoleucine, propionate, alanine, acetate, ethanolamine and sucrose. Moreover, a good tendency to separation between the two groups was observed on the scatterplot of the NMR. On the other hand, the distribution of the groups attending to the periodontal status was very similar and we didn´t find any association between GBL and periodontal status (Chi-Square 0.1968, p = 0.91). Subsequently, the sample as a whole (130 individuals) was divided into three groups by periodontal status in order to identify biomarkers for PD. Group 1 was composed of periodontally healthy individuals, group 2 had gingivitis or early periodontitis and group 3 had moderate to advanced periodontitis. On comparing periodontal status, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in certain metabolites was observed. These findings along with previous reports suggest that these could be used as biomarkers of a PD: caproate, isocaproate+butyrate, isovalerate, isopropanol+methanol, 4 aminobutyrate, choline, sucrose, sucrose-glucose-lysine, lactate-proline, lactate and proline. The scatter plot showed a good tendency to wards separation between group 1 and 3.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biomarkers/metabolism
Chronic Periodontitis/metabolism
Glioblastoma/metabolism
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/methods
Saliva/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188710

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[PMID]: 29346448
[Au] Autor:Stella JL; Bauer AE; Croney CC
[Ad] Address:USDA-APHIS, Purdue University, W. Lafayette, Indiana, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:A cross-sectional study to estimate prevalence of periodontal disease in a population of dogs (Canis familiaris) in commercial breeding facilities in Indiana and Illinois.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191395, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The objectives of this cross-sectional study were: 1) to estimate the prevalence and characterize the severity of periodontal disease in a population of dogs housed in commercial breeding facilities; 2) to characterize PD preventive care utilized by facility owners; and 3) to assess inter-rater reliability of a visual scoring assessment tool. Adult dogs (N = 445) representing 42 breeds at 24 CB facilities in Indiana and Illinois were assessed. Periodontal disease was scored visually using the American Veterinary Dental Collage 0-IV scale. Inter-rater reliability was assessed on 198 dogs and facility owners were asked to provide information about the preventive care utilized. The overall prevalence of periodontal disease (Grades I-IV) was 86.3% (95% CI: 82.9, 89.3). An ordered logistic regression analysis found age (OR = 1.4; 95% CI 1.24, 1.54; P<0.0001), facility (OR = 1.13; 95% CI 1.09, 1.18; P<0.0001), sex (OR = 1.7; 95% CI 1.12, 2.65; P = 0.013), and non-professional dental scaling (OR = 2.82; 95% CI 1.34, 5.91; P = 0.006) to be statistically significant. Inter-rater reliability analysis found agreement to be 86.2%, with a weighted kappa of 0.4731 (95% CI 0.3847, 0.5615) indicating moderate agreement. Risk of periodontal disease increased with increasing age. Additionally, a trend toward decreasing risk with increasing weight was also found, although it was not statistically significant. The trends identified agree with studies that have evaluated periodontal disease in the companion dog population and do not support the assumption that the dental health of dogs in commercial breeding facilities is worse than that of the population as a whole. Although there were few cases of severe periodontal disease and all facilities employed some type of preventive care in this sample, the large number of dogs with some degree of disease (Grades I-IV) suggests that further investigation of preventive care is warranted.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Breeding
Dog Diseases/epidemiology
Periodontal Diseases/veterinary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Cross-Sectional Studies
Dogs
Female
Illinois/epidemiology
Indiana/epidemiology
Logistic Models
Male
Periodontal Diseases/epidemiology
Prevalence
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180119
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191395

  5 / 33783 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521196
[Au] Autor:Itabe H; Kato R; Sasabe N; Obama T; Yamamoto M
[Ad] Address:Division of Biological Chemistry, Department of Molecular Biology, Showa University School of Pharmacy, Tokyo. Japan.
[Ti] Title:Significance of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in body fluids as a marker related to diseased conditions.
[So] Source:Curr Med Chem;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1875-533X
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to be involved in various diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. The presence of oxLDL in the human circulatory system and in atherosclerotic lesions has been demonstrated using monoclonal antibodies. Studies have shown the significance of circulating oxLDL in various systemic diseases, including acute myocardial infarction and diabetic mellitus. Several different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) procedures to measure oxLDL were utilized. Evidence has been accumulating that reveals changes in oxLDL levels under certain pathological conditions. Since oxLDL concentration tends to correlate with low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, the ratio of oxLDL and LDL rather than oxLDL concentration alone has been focused attention. In addition to circulating plasma, LDL and oxLDL are found in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), where the ratio of oxLDL to LDL in GCF is much higher than in plasma. LDL and oxLDL levels in GCF show an increase in diabetic patients and periodontal patients, suggesting that GCF might be useful in examining systemic conditions. GCF oxLDL increased when the teeth were affected by periodontitis. It is likely that oxLDL levels in plasma and GCF could reflect oxidative stress and transfer efficacy in circulatory system.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2174/0929867325666180307114855

  6 / 33783 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520828
[Au] Autor:Delange N; Lindsay S; Lemus H; Finlayson TL; Kelley ST; Gottlieb RA
[Ad] Address:San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Diego, CA.
[Ti] Title:Periodontal disease and its connection to systemic biomarkers of cardiovascular disease in young American Indian/Alaskan natives.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;89(2):219-227, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Periodontal disease has been shown to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). No known studies evaluate the relationship between periodontal disease status and biomarkers of CVD risk in the American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) population despite their disproportionately high rates of poor oral health and cardiovascular disease-related outcomes. This study compared levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) across increasing severity of periodontal disease status among younger adults between the ages of 21 and 43 years. METHODS: Plasma levels of IL-6 and CRP were measured in adult participants (ages 21 to 43 years) as part of a study of periodontal disease and CVD risk among an AI/AN population in southern California (n = 59). Periodontal evaluations were performed and disease status was classified into three categories based on highest probing depth (none/mild: < 3 mm; moderate: 4 to 5 mm; severe: ≥6 mm). Participants with known systemic disease or active infection were excluded. RESULTS: Severe periodontitis was significantly associated with increased levels of IL-6 compared with those with none or mild periodontitis before controlling for other variables (P = 0.02), but lacked significance after controlling for sex, BMI, smoking status, and high-density lipoprotein (P = 0.09). Moderate periodontal disease was positively associated with IL-6 levels after controlling for potential confounders (P = 0.01). Periodontal status was not associated with CRP, before or after adjusting for covariates. CONCLUSIONS: In this otherwise healthy AI/AN adult sample, moderate periodontal disease compared with none or mild periodontal disease was associated with increased levels of IL-6. High levels of CRP found in this population warrant further research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0319

  7 / 33783 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520806
[Au] Autor:Bassir SH; Chase I; Paster BJ; Gordon LB; Kleinman ME; Kieran MW; Kim DM; Sonis A
[Ad] Address:Division of Periodontology, Department of Oral Medicine, Infection, and Immunity, Harvard School of Dental Medicine, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.
[Ti] Title:Microbiome at sites of gingival recession in children with Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Hutchinson-Gilford progeria syndrome (HGPS) is a rare premature aging disorder with significant oral and dental abnormalities. Clinical symptoms include various features of accelerated aging such as alopecia, loss of subcutaneous fat, bone abnormalities, and premature cardiovascular disease. In addition, children with HGPS have been observed to suffer from generalized gingival recession. Whether periodontal manifestations associated with this syndrome are the results of changes in the oral flora is unknown. The present study aimed to identify the microbial composition of subgingival sites with gingival recession in children with HGPS. METHODS: Nine children with HGPS were enrolled in this study. Plaque samples were collected from teeth with gingival recession. DNA samples were analyzed using the Human Oral Microbe Identification Microarray (HOMIM). Microbial profiles from HGPS children were compared with microbial profiles of controls from healthy individuals (n = 9) and subjects with periodontal disease (n = 9). RESULTS: Comparison of microbial compositions of HGPS samples with periodontal health samples demonstrated significant differences for 2 bacterial taxa; Porphyromonas catoniae and Prevotella oulora were present in children with HGPS, but not normal controls. There were statistically significant differences of 20 bacterial taxa between HGPS and periodontal disease groups. CONCLUSION: Typical periodontal pathogeneses were not present at sites with gingival recession in HGPS children. The microbial compositions of sites of gingival recession and attachment loss in HGPS were generally more similar to those of periodontal health than periodontal disease. Species other than typical periodontal pathogens may be involved in this recession. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0351

  8 / 33783 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520781
[Au] Autor:Qi H; Li B; Wang H; Cai Q; Quan X; Cui Y; Meng W
[Ad] Address:Department of Dental Implantology, School and Hospital of Stomatology, Jinlin University, Changchun, China.
[Ti] Title:Effects of d-Valine on Periodontal or Peri-Implant Pathogens: Porphyromonas gingivalis Biofilm.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: When presented with a surface or an interface, bacteria often grow as biofilms in which cells are held together by an extracellular matrix. Biofilm formation on implants is an initiating factor for their failure. Porphyromonas gingivalis is the primary etiologic bacteria of initiation and progression of periodontal disease. This microorganism is also the risk factor of many systemic diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and pulmonary infection. To date, no medication that can remove such biofilm has been accepted for clinical use. D-valine (D-val) can reportedly inhibit the formation of biofilm and/or trigger the scattering of mature biofilm. Accordingly, this study investigated the effects of d-val on single-species P. gingivalis biofilms in vitro. METHODS: P. gingivalis grown in brain heart infusion culture with or without d-val was inoculated in 24- or 96-well plates. After incubation for 72 hours, biomass via crystal violet staining, extracellular polysaccharide production by biofilms, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were used to determine the d-val concentration that can effectively prevent P. gingivalis biofilm formation. RESULTS: Experimental results showed that d-val effectively inhibited biofilm formation at concentrations ≥50 mM (mMol/L), and that d-val inhibition increased with increased concentration. Moreover, at high concentrations, the bacterial form changed from the normal baseball form into a rodlike shape. d-val also notably affected extracellular polysaccharide production by P. gingivalis. CONCLUSIONS: d-val can inhibit P. gingivalis biofilm formation, and high concentrations can affect bacterial morphology.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0405

  9 / 33783 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520774
[Au] Autor:Fentoglu Ö; Dinç G; Dogru A; Karahan N; Ilhan I; Kirzioglu FY; Sentürk MF; Orhan H
[Ad] Address:Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Süleyman Demirel, Isparta, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Serum, salivary, and tissue levels of plasminogen in familial Mediterranean fever, amyloidosis, and chronic periodontitis.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: There are no published studies regarding the role of the plasminogen (PLG) system in familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), FMF-associated secondary amyloidosis, or chronic periodontitis (CP), although recent limited data have focused on the association between FMF and chronic periodontitis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the serum, salivary, and gingival tissue levels of PLG in patients with CP, FMF, and amyloidosis. METHODS: The study population included 122 patients with FMF (only FMF, and FMF and amyloidosis and 128 individuals who were systemically healthy controls. Blood and salivary samples were obtained from the cases and controls, and clinical periodontal parameters were recorded. Serum and salivary PLG levels were assessed. The gingival tissue samples of the case and control groups were analyzed histopathologically and immunohistochemically for amyloid deposition and PLG. RESULTS: The amyloidosis group had significantly more severe clinical periodontal parameters than those of the FMF and systemically healthy groups (P < 0.05). Salivary levels of PLG were significantly higher in the FMF and amyloidosis groups compared with those in the control group (P < 0.001). The FMF with periodontitis and amyloidosis with periodontitis groups had higher salivary PLG levels compared with those in the CP group. Serum and salivary PLG levels were significantly associated with the clinical periodontal parameters in the FMF group. The amyloidosis cases had hyperplasia, severe inflammation, and activation of the gingiva. CONCLUSION: The PLG system could play an important role in inflammatory diseases, such as chronic periodontitis, FMF, and FMF-associated secondary amyloidosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0243

  10 / 33783 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520772
[Au] Autor:Graziani F; Discepoli N; Gennai S; Karapetsa D; Nisi M; Bianchi L; Rosema NAM; Van der Velden U
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgical, Medical and Molecular Pathology and Critical Care Medicine, University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
[Ti] Title:The effect of twice daily kiwifruit consumption on periodontal and systemic conditions before and after treatment: A randomized clinical trial.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: To assess the nutraceutical effects of twice/daily intake of kiwifruit on periodontal parameters and systemic health before and after initial periodontal treatment (IPT). METHODS: At baseline, participants were randomly assigned to test and control group, and either consumed two kiwifruits/day for 5 months or no kiwifruit. In the first 2 months, no periodontal treatment was delivered (2 M). Subsequently, a session of full-mouth IPT within 24 hours was performed. Participants were then re-assessed after 3 months (5 M). Blood samples, evaluating systemic biomarkers and vital signs, were also collected atbaseline, 2 M, and 5 M. RESULTS: Groups were balanced at baseline. At 2 M no within-groups differences could be detected for any parameter but the bleeding score, which decreased significantly in the kiwifruit group by 6.67% ± 11.90% (P < 0.01). Comparison of test and control group showed that 2 months of kiwifruit consumption resulted in significant lower values of bleeding, plaque, and attachment loss. After IPT both groups demonstrated substantial significant clinical benefits however the control group showed significant greater reductions of bleeding, plaque and attachment loss than the test group. Systemic biomarkers and vital signs did not show clinically relevant differences between test and control group. CONCLUSIONS: Kiwifruit consumption reduces gingival inflammation despite the lack of any periodontal instrumentation or patient's behavioral changes. No adjunctive effect to periodontal treatment of dietary intake of kiwifruit was noted. (NCT NCT03084484).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0148


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