Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29099363
[Au] Autor:Kane SF
[Ti] Title:The effects of oral health on systemic health.
[So] Source:Gen Dent;65(6):30-34, 2017 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:0363-6771
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The oral cavity is the intersection of medicine and dentistry and the window into the general health of a patient. Hundreds of diseases and medications impact the oral cavity, and pathologic conditions in the mouth have a greater systemic impact than many providers appreciate. It is unclear whether there is true causality or just an association between periodontal disease and certain other systemic conditions, including atherosclerotic vascular disease, pulmonary disease, diabetes, pregnancy-related complications, osteoporosis, and kidney disease. Diabetes has a true bidirectional relationship with periodontal disease, and there is strong evidence that treating one condition positively impacts the other. A shared trait of periodontal disease and these medical conditions is that they are chronic conditions that take a long time to develop and become clinically significant. Primary prevention-treating the patient prior to the onset of symptoms, myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetic complications, or significant periodontal disease-is the challenge. Complications associated with these conditions cause significant morbidity and mortality and are incredibly costly to the healthcare system. Unfortunately, a lack of access to primary medical or dental care prevents some patients from engaging the system until a negative event has occurred. Despite the absence of clear evidence of causality and the direct impact of treatments, the consequences of these chronic conditions for the population are well understood. Dentists, family physicians, and all primary care providers must increase their collaboration and communication to maximize the benefit to patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 32055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29094770
[Au] Autor:He S; Thomson WM
[Ad] Address:College of Stomatology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China.
[Ti] Title:An oral epidemiological comparison of Chinese and New Zealand adults in 2 key age groups.
[So] Source:Community Dent Oral Epidemiol;, 2017 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0528
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To use recent national survey data to compare dentition status and oral diseases in China and New Zealand (NZ), with a particular focus on differences by sex and education level. METHODS: We undertook secondary analysis of representative data from oral health surveys conducted in 2009 in Sichuan (China) and NZ. Both surveys had an oral examination component and collected detailed demographic data. Socioeconomic position in this analysis was represented by the highest level of education completed. Participants were allocated to 1 of 3 comparable ordinal categories of years of education (primary, middle or tertiary). Analyses used survey weights. RESULTS: The proportion of Chinese who had been educated to only primary level was 3 times higher than that among their NZ counterparts, and the proportion with a tertiary education was correspondingly lower. In the 35-44 age group, the dentate proportions were similar, although the mean number of teeth was higher in China than in NZ. There were substantial differences in dental caries experience, with the mean DMFT in NZ being almost 3 times that observed in China. New Zealanders had more filled teeth, but the prevalence of 1+ missing teeth was lower. Periodontitis was more common in the NZ sample than in the Chinese one, although the extent of bleeding on probing was almost 3 times higher among the latter. For the 65-74 age group, there were significant differences in dentition status, with greater tooth retention among Chinese people. There were also significant differences in dental caries experience, with Chinese 65- to 74-year-olds having more decayed teeth but fewer filled or missing teeth, and lower DMFT scores, on average. Periodontal health was better among the New Zealanders. There were notable differences by sex and education level. CONCLUSIONS: The differences observed in this study provide strong support for using broader sociocultural models of oral health.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/cdoe.12348

  3 / 32055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29094650
[Au] Autor:Schwinté P; Mariotte A; Anand P; Keller L; Idoux-Gillet Y; Huck O; Fioretti F; Tenenbaum H; Georgel P; Wenzel W; Irusta S; Benkirane-Jessel N
[Ad] Address:INSERM (French National Institute of Health & Medical Research), UMR 1109, "Osteoarticular & Dental Regenerative Nanomedicine", Faculté de Médecine, 11 rue Humann, FMTS, Strasbourg, F-67085, France.
[Ti] Title:Anti-inflammatory effect of active nanofibrous polymeric membrane bearing nanocontainers of atorvastatin complexes.
[So] Source:Nanomedicine (Lond);, 2017 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:1748-6963
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: We developed polymeric membranes for local administration of nonsoluble anti-inflammatory statin, as potential wound patch in rheumatic joint or periodontal lesions. METHODS: Electrospun polycaprolactone membranes were fitted with polysaccharide-atorvastatin nanoreservoirs by using complexes with poly-aminocyclodextrin. Characterization methods are UV-Visible and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, molecular dynamics, scanning and transmission electron microscopy. In vitro, membranes were seeded with macrophages, and inflammatory cytokine expression were monitored. RESULTS & CONCLUSION: Stable inclusion complexes were formed in solution (1:1 stability constant 368 M , -117.40 kJ mol ), with supramolecular globular organization (100 nm, substructure 30 nm). Nanoreservoir technology leads to homogeneous distribution of atorvastatin calcium trihydrate complexes in the membrane. Quantity embedded was estimated (70-90 µg in 30 µm × 6 mm membrane). Anti-inflammatory effect by cell contact-dependent release reached 60% inhibition for TNF-α and 80% for IL-6. The novelty resides in the double protection offered by the cyclodextrins as drug molecular chaperones, with further embedding into biodegradable nanoreservoirs. The strategy is versatile and can target other diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2217/nnm-2017-0198

  4 / 32055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29093283
[Au] Autor:Alkadasi B; Abdulrab S; Gaafer S; Kalakonda B; Hosny M; Shaker O; Hosny M
[Ad] Address:Department of Periodontology, Faculty of Dentistry, Ibb University.
[Ti] Title:Effect of adjunctive use of systemic antioxidant therapy (N-acetylcysteine) on soluble receptor activator nuclear factor κB ligand levels in gingival crevicular fluid following surgical periodontal treatment for chronic periodontitis.
[So] Source:J Oral Sci;, 2017 Oct 31.
[Is] ISSN:1880-4926
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is an anti-oxidant drug that has been used as a mucolytic agent and a paracetamol antidote for many years. This study was designed to determine the efficacy of the adjunctive use of NAC for periodontal treatment. Thirty subjects with moderate-to-severe chronic periodontitis were randomized to surgery with NAC (600 mg; S-NAC), surgery only (S-nonNAC), and healthy control groups. Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples were obtained from all patients and sRANKL levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay at baseline, and 1, 3, and 7 months post-surgery. Plaque and gingival indices, probing depths, and clinical attachment levels were recorded at the same time. There was a significant reduction in probing depth at 3 months in the S-NAC group when compared to the S-nonNAC group (P < 0.05). However, no statistically significant differences in plaque and gingival indices, probing depths, clinical attachment levels, and sRANKL levels in GCF were noted between the surgical treatment groups at the end of 7 months. Hence, the use of adjunctive NAC resulted in a significant reduction in probing depths in the S-NAC group when compared to the S-nonNAC group at 3 months, but no statistically significant differences in GCF sRANKL levels were observed in the sites that underwent surgical treatment with or without NAC at different time intervals.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2334/josnusd.16-0701

  5 / 32055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28966323
[Au] Autor:Srisuwantha R; Shiheido Y; Aoyama N; Sato H; Kure K; Laosrisin N; Izumi Y; Suzuki JI
[Ad] Address:Department of Conservative Dentistry and Prosthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Srinakharinwirot University.
[Ti] Title:Porphyromonas Gingivalis Elevated High-Mobility Group Box 1 Levels After Myocardial Infarction in Mice.
[So] Source:Int Heart J;58(5):762-768, 2017 Oct 21.
[Is] ISSN:1349-3299
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:High mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) is a nuclear protein released from necrotic cells, inducing inflammatory responses. Epidemiological studies suggested a possible association between periodontitis and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs). Due to tissue damage and necrosis of cardiac cells following myocardial infarction (MI), HMGB1 is released, activating an inflammatory reaction. However, it remains unclear whether periodontitis is also involved in myocardial damage. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of the periodontal pathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis (P.g.) after MI in mice.C57BL/6J wild type mice in post-MI were inoculated with P.g. in the infected group (P.g.-inoculated MI group) and with phosphate buffer saline (PBS) in the control group (PBS-injected MI group). Plasma samples and twelve tissue samples from mice hearts after MI were obtained. We determined the expression of HMGB1 by ELISA and immunohistochemistry.The level of HMGB1 protein in the P.g.-inoculated MI group was significantly higher than in the PBS-injected MI group on day 5, but not on day 14. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed that HMGB1 was mainly expressed in cardiomyocytes, immune cells, and vascular endothelial cells in the PBS-injected MI group, while HMGB1 was seen broadly in degenerated cardiomyocytes, extracellular fields, immune cells, and vascular endothelial cells in the P.g.-inoculated MI group. A significant increase in the number of HMGB1 positive cells was observed in the P.g.-inoculated MI group compared to the PBS-injected MI group.Infection with P.g. after MI enhanced myocardial HMGB1 expression. There is a possible relationship between periodontitis and post-infarction myocardial inflammation through HMGB-1.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacteroidaceae Infections/complications
HMGB1 Protein/biosynthesis
Myocardial Infarction/metabolism
Myocardium/metabolism
Porphyromonas gingivalis/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bacteroidaceae Infections/metabolism
Bacteroidaceae Infections/microbiology
Biomarkers/metabolism
Disease Models, Animal
Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred C57BL
Myocardial Infarction/etiology
Myocardial Infarction/pathology
Myocardium/pathology
Myocytes, Cardiac/metabolism
Myocytes, Cardiac/pathology
Porphyromonas gingivalis/isolation & purification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (HMGB1 Protein); 0 (HMGB1 protein, mouse)
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171002
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1536/ihj.16-500

  6 / 32055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28888760
[Au] Autor:Akhalwaya S; van Vuuren S; Patel M
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacy and Pharmacology, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa.
[Ti] Title:An in vitro investigation of indigenous South African medicinal plants used to treat oral infections.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;210:359-371, 2017 Sep 07.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Over a 120 South African medicinal plants are used for the treatment of oral diseases. Despite the vast collection of antimicrobial studies being done on South African plants, there is still limited research on pathogens associated with oral infections. In consultation with the available ethnobotanical literature, this study investigates the antimicrobial efficacy of some South African medicinal plants against oral pathogens. AIM OF THE STUDY: To provide a detailed account of the antimicrobial properties of selected South African medicinal plants used traditionally to treat oral infections. The effect on Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and the toxicity profiles of these plants are also investigated. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 136 aqueous and organic extracts and six essential oils were prepared from 31 different plant species. These plant samples were screened for antimicrobial efficacy against nine oral pathogens using the micro-titre plate dilution assay. Plant extracts that were found to have noteworthy antimicrobial activity against S. mutans were further evaluated on the effect on S. mutans biofilm formation using the glass slide technique. The toxicity profiles of plant samples that were found to have noteworthy antimicrobial activity were evaluated using the brine shrimp lethality assay. RESULTS: The organic extract of Cissampelos torulosa stems displayed the lowest MIC value of 0.05mg/mL against both Lactobacillus spp. This high antimicrobial activity was also observed with the organic extract of Spirostachys africana leaves against Candida albicans. In some instances, a direct relationship was found between the traditional use of the plant and the antimicrobial activity observed. For example, noteworthy activity (MIC < 1.00mg/mL) was observed against all three Candida spp. when tested against Clematis brachiata (leaves), a plant traditionally used to treat oral thrush. Englerophytum magalismonatanum stems displayed notable activity against both Streptococcus spp. (MIC 0.83mg/mL against S. mutans and MIC 0.67mg/mL against S. sanguis). Spirostachys africana leaves displayed the greatest anti-adherent properties against S. mutans biofilm formation at both 24 and 48h, reducing the biofilm by 97.56% and 86.58% respectively. The majority of plant samples tested in the brine shrimp lethality assay (BSLA) were considered safe, however, 13 plant samples were considered toxic, at a concentration of 1mg/mL. CONCLUSION: Noteworthy antimicrobial activity for plants species such as C. brachiata and E. magalismonatnum provides validation for the traditional use of these plants. Spirostachys africana displayed the greatest reduction of adherent S. mutans cells. The BSLA results revealed that the majority of the plant samples were not toxic in nature. The findings from the results favour the potential use of these plants in treating oral diseases such as dental caries, periodontal diseases and oral thrush.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 32055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28661039
[Au] Autor:Wang T; Kang W; Du L; Ge S
[Ad] Address:Shandong Provincial Key Laboratory of Oral Tissue Regeneration, School of Stomatology, Shandong University, Jinan, China.
[Ti] Title:Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 facilitates the proliferation, migration and pluripotency of human periodontal ligament stem cells.
[So] Source:J Cell Mol Med;21(11):3100-3112, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1582-4934
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The selective in vitro expansion and differentiation of multipotent stem cells are critical steps in cell-based regenerative therapies, while technical challenges have limited cell yield and thus affected the success of these potential treatments. The Rho GTPases and downstream Rho kinases are central regulators of cytoskeletal dynamics during cell cycle and determine the balance between stem cells self-renewal, lineage commitment and apoptosis. Trans-4-[(1R)-aminoethyl]-N-(4-pyridinyl)cylohexanecarboxamidedihydrochloride (Y-27632), Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) inhibitor, involves various cellular functions that include actin cytoskeleton organization, cell adhesion, cell motility and anti-apoptosis. Here, human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) were isolated by limiting dilution method. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK8), 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) labelling assay, cell apoptosis assay, cell migration assay, wound-healing assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity assay, Alizarin Red S staining, Oil Red O staining, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) were used to determine the effects of Y-27632 on the proliferation, apoptosis, migration, stemness, osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of PDLSCs. Afterwards, Western blot analysis was performed to elucidate the mechanism of cell proliferation. The results indicated that Y-27632 significantly promoted cell proliferation, chemotaxis, wound healing, fat droplets formation and pluripotency, while inhibited ALP activity and mineral deposition. Furthermore, Y-27632 induced PDLSCs proliferation through extracellular-signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signalling cascade. Therefore, control of Rho-kinase activity may enhance the efficiency of stem cell-based treatments for periodontal diseases and the strategy may have the potential to promote periodontal tissue regeneration by facilitating the chemotaxis of PDLSCs to the injured site, and then enhancing the proliferation of these cells and maintaining their pluripotency.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/jcmm.13222

  8 / 32055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29070806
[Au] Autor:Zhang Q; Chen L; Cui S; Li Y; Zhao Q; Cao W; Lai S; Yin S; Zuo Z; Ren J
[Ad] Address:Key Laboratory of Oral Medicine, Guangzhou Institute of Oral Disease, Stomatology Hospital of Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou, 510140, China.
[Ti] Title:Expression and regulation of long noncoding RNAs during the osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells in the inflammatory microenvironment.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;7(1):13991, 2017 Oct 25.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Although long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been emerging as critical regulators in various tissues and biological processes, little is known about their expression and regulation during the osteogenic differentiation of periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) in inflammatory microenvironment. In this study, we have identified 63 lncRNAs that are not annotated in previous database. These novel lncRNAs were not randomly located in the genome but preferentially located near protein-coding genes related to particular functions and diseases, such as stem cell maintenance and differentiation, development disorders and inflammatory diseases. Moreover, we have identified 650 differentially expressed lncRNAs among different subsets of PDLSCs. Pathway enrichment analysis for neighboring protein-coding genes of these differentially expressed lncRNAs revealed stem cell differentiation related functions. Many of these differentially expressed lncRNAs function as competing endogenous RNAs that regulate protein-coding transcripts through competing shared miRNAs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171101
[Lr] Last revision date:171101
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41598-017-14451-4

  9 / 32055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28812320
[Au] Autor:Savic Pavicin I; Dumancic J; Jukic T; Badel T
[Ad] Address:Department of Dental Anthropology, School of Dental Medicine, University of Zagreb, Zagreb, Croatia.
[Ti] Title:The relationship between periodontal disease, tooth loss and decreased skeletal bone mineral density in ageing women.
[So] Source:Gerodontology;34(4):441-445, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1741-2358
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: Osteoporosis and periodontitis are both chronic diseases characterised by bone loss. Potential association is of great clinical importance because of multifactorial aetiology and common risk factors. The aim of this study was to determine relationship between bone mineral density (BMD), tooth loss and periodontal status taking into account age, number of years since onset of menopause and educational level. With increasing age, number of years since onset of menopause and lower educational level, decreased BMD, deteriorating periodontal status and greater tooth loss are expected. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Cross-sectional study included 112 women aged 45-80 years (mean 58.3 years). BMD was determined for lumbar spine region and proximal femur by DEXA technology. Dental status and periodontal status were evaluated clinically and on panoramic radiographs. For the analysis of tooth loss frequency, participants were divided into four age groups. RESULTS: Significant inverse correlation was found between number of lost teeth and BMD at hip region (r = -.227; P = .028) but not at the lumbar spine (r = -.05; P = .669). Several indicators of the periodontal condition were significantly correlated with BMD, but not with postmenopausal period length. Important result is that participants missing one or more incisors or canines had significantly lower mean value of BMD comparing to those who had all the incisors and canines remained. CONCLUSION: Although osteoporosis is not the main cause of periodontitis, it may be a factor that leads to enhanced periodontal pocket depth and greater risk of tooth loss in ageing women.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/ger.12290

  10 / 32055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28643937
[Au] Autor:Gao H; Hou J; Meng H; Zhang X; Zheng Y; Peng L
[Ad] Address:Department of Periodontology, Peking University School and Hospital of Stomatology, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Proinflammatory effects and mechanisms of calprotectin on human gingival fibroblasts.
[So] Source:J Periodontal Res;52(6):975-983, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0765
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Calprotectin (S100A8/A9) is a heterodimer of S100A8 and S100A9 and is associated with multiple inflammatory diseases, including Crohn's disease, rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis. Levels of calprotectin are elevated in the gingival crevicular fluid of patients with periodontitis; however, the effects of calprotectin on human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs) remain unknown. This study investigated the proinflammatory activity of calprotectin on HGFs and the functional receptors and signaling pathways engaged by calprotectin. MATERIAL AND METHODS: HGFs were stimulated by equimolar concentrations of S100A8 and/or S100A9, and the expression levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and IL-8 were detected using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. The calprotectin receptors were identified by pre-incubating HGFs with the toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 inhibitor or the antibody targeting the advanced glycation end product receptor (RAGE). The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and signaling pathways were also investigated by treating HGFs with ROS inhibitor or specific pathway inhibitors, respectively. RESULTS: S100A9 and S100A8/A9 significantly upregulated IL-6 and IL-8 expression, which was inhibited upon treatment with the TLR4 inhibitor TAK242. Pretreatment with RAGE-blocking antibodies did not affect cytokine expression. Additionally, S100A9 promoted the production of IL-6 and IL-8 from HGFs via different signaling pathways. IL-6 expression was upregulated via the NF-κB, c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK) 1/2 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, and IL-8 expression was upregulated via NF-κB, p38, JNK1/2 and extracellular-regulated kinase 1/2 MAPK pathways. The release of both cytokines was dependent upon the production of ROS. CONCLUSION: Our findings suggest that calprotectin exerts proinflammatory effects on HGFs via the S100A9 subunit and TLR4-mediated NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/jre.12465


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