Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29524787
[Au] Autor:Kato S; Ekuni D; Kawakami S; Mude AH; Morita M; Minagi S
[Ad] Address:Department of Occlusal and Oral Functional Rehabilitation, Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Okayama University, 2-5-1, Shikata-cho, Kita-ku, Okayama 700-8525, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Relationship between severity of periodontitis and masseter muscle activity during waking and sleeping hours.
[So] Source:Arch Oral Biol;90:13-18, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1506
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This study was conducted to investigate whether the masseter muscle activity shows any specific pattern in relation to the severity of periodontitis. DESIGN: Sixteen subjects with no or mild periodontitis (NMP group) and 15 subjects with moderate or severe periodontitis (MSP group) were enrolled. Plasma IgG antibody titer was examined using Porphyromonas gingivalis as a bacterial antigen. Surface electromyography (EMG) of the masseter muscles was continuously recorded using an ambulatory surface EMG recording device while patients were awake and asleep. Masseter muscle activity was analyzed using intensities of 5%-10% maximal voluntary clenching (MVC), 10%-20% MVC, and >20% MVC. Furthermore, EMG levels of 20% MVC were adopted as the threshold for analysis of phasic, tonic, and mixed EMG activities. The cumulative duration of masseter muscle activity and bruxism episodes was calculated as duration per hour. RESULTS: There was no significant difference in plasma IgG antibody titers against P. gingivalis between the NMP and MSP groups (p = 0.423). During waking hours, the duration of masseter muscle activity with an intensity of >20% MVC was significantly longer in the MSP group than in the NMP group (p = 0.037). During sleeping hours, the duration of masseter muscle activity at all MVC intensities was significantly longer in the MSP group than in the NMP group (all p < 0.05). Additionally, the duration of phasic and mixed episodes was significantly longer in the MSP group than those in the NMP group while both awake and asleep (all p < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study suggested that masseter muscle activity might be related to the severity of periodontitis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29524430
[Au] Autor:Abidi M; Khan MS; Ahmad S; Kausar T; Nayeem SM; Islam S; Ali A; Alam K; Moinuddin
[Ad] Address:Department of Biochemistry, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, AMU, Aligarh, India.
[Ti] Title:Biophysical and biochemical studies on glycoxidatively modified human low density lipoprotein.
[So] Source:Arch Biochem Biophys;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0384
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Methylglyoxal (MGO), a reactive dicarbonyl metabolite is a potent arginine directed glycating agent which has implications for diabetes-related complications. Dicarbonyl metabolites are produced endogenously and in a state of misbalance, they contribute to cell and tissue dysfunction through protein and DNA modifications causing dicarbonyl stress. MGO is detoxified by glyoxalase 1 (GLO1) system in the cytoplasm. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to aggravate the glycation process. Both the processes are closely linked, and their combined activity is often referred to as "glycoxidation" process. Glycoxidation of proteins has several consequences such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), aging etc. In this study, we have investigated the glycation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) using different concentrations of MGO for varied incubation time periods. The structural perturbations induced in LDL were analyzed by UV-Vis, fluorescence, circular dichroism spectroscopy, molecular docking studies, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, FTIR, thermal denaturation studies, Thioflavin T assay and isothermal titration calorimetry. The ketoamine moieties, carbonyl content and HMF content were quantitated in native and glycated LDL. Simulation studies were also done to see the effect of MGO on the secondary structure of the protein. We report structural perturbations, increased carbonyl content, ketoamine moieties and HMF content in glycated LDL as compared to native analog (native LDL). We report the structural perturbations in LDL upon modification with MGO which could obstruct its normal physiological functions and hence contribute to disease pathogenesis and associated complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 31433 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524025
[Au] Autor:Meschi N; Fieuws S; Vanhoenacker A; Strijbos O; Van der Veken D; Politis C; Lambrechts P
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Health Sciences, Endodontology, KU Leuven & Dentistry, University Hospitals Leuven, Kapucijnenvoer 7 blok a- box 7001, 3000 Leuven, Belgium. nastaran.meschi@kuleuven.be.
[Ti] Title:Root-end surgery with leucocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin and an occlusive membrane: a randomized controlled clinical trial on patients' quality of life.
[So] Source:Clin Oral Investig;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1436-3771
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the adjunct of leukocyte- and platelet-rich fibrin (LPRF) to root-end surgery (RES) on the patients' quality of life during the first week post RES. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients in need of RES were recruited for an open randomized controlled clinical trial (RCT) with a 2 2 factorial design. They were randomly allocated to the test (+LPRF) and control (-LPRF) group. Each group was subsequently divided into two strata: with or without an occlusive membrane (Bio-Gide, Geistlich Biomaterials, Switzerland; BG). After RES, the patients completed daily for 1week a visual analog pain scale (VAS) and a 5-point Likert-type scale questionnaire concerning activity impairment, occurrence of symptoms, and medication use. RESULTS: Fifty patients were included, equally divided between the test and control group. Only one patient in the "-LPRF+BG-group" had to take additional antibiotics due to a persistent jaw swelling. There was no evidence (p ≤ 0.05) for a difference between the test and control group in VAS, occurrence of pain symptoms, impairment of daily activities, and medication use, over the 7days and daily during the 7days post RES. CONCLUSIONS: There was no statistical significant evidence for improvement of patients' quality of life during the first week post RES with LPRF in comparison with RES without LPRF. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Although LPRF seems to be an inexpensive and autologous agent to reduce pain and swelling post RES, this RCT does not provide a statistical significant evidence for that.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00784-018-2343-z

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[PMID]: 29408884
[Au] Autor:Garca-Villaescusa A; Morales-Tatay JM; Monlen-Salvad D; Gonzlez-Darder JM; Bellot-Arcis C; Montiel-Company JM; Almerich-Silla JM
[Ad] Address:Departament d'Estomatologia, Facultad de Medicina y Odontologa, Universitat de Valncia, Valencia, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Using NMR in saliva to identify possible biomarkers of glioblastoma and chronic periodontitis.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0188710, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nowadays there is increasing interest in identifying-and using-metabolites that can be employed as biomarkers for diagnosing, treating and monitoring diseases. Saliva and NMR have been widely used for this purpose as they are fast and inexpensive methods. This case-control study aimed to find biomarkers that could be related to glioblastoma (GBL) and periodontal disease (PD) and studied a possible association between GBL and periodontal status. The participants numbered 130, of whom 10 were diagnosed with GBL and were assigned to the cases group, while the remaining 120 did not present any pathology and were assigned to the control group. On one hand, significantly increased (p < 0.05) metabolites were found in GBL group: leucine, valine, isoleucine, propionate, alanine, acetate, ethanolamine and sucrose. Moreover, a good tendency to separation between the two groups was observed on the scatterplot of the NMR. On the other hand, the distribution of the groups attending to the periodontal status was very similar and we didnt find any association between GBL and periodontal status (Chi-Square 0.1968, p = 0.91). Subsequently, the sample as a whole (130 individuals) was divided into three groups by periodontal status in order to identify biomarkers for PD. Group 1 was composed of periodontally healthy individuals, group 2 had gingivitis or early periodontitis and group 3 had moderate to advanced periodontitis. On comparing periodontal status, a significant increase (p < 0.05) in certain metabolites was observed. These findings along with previous reports suggest that these could be used as biomarkers of a PD: caproate, isocaproate+butyrate, isovalerate, isopropanol+methanol, 4 aminobutyrate, choline, sucrose, sucrose-glucose-lysine, lactate-proline, lactate and proline. The scatter plot showed a good tendency to wards separation between group 1 and 3.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biomarkers/metabolism
Chronic Periodontitis/metabolism
Glioblastoma/metabolism
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy/methods
Saliva/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0188710

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[PMID]: 29306533
[Au] Autor:Zandi H; Kristoffersen AK; rstavik D; Ras IN; Siqueira JF; Enersen M
[Ad] Address:Department of Endodontics, Institute of Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway; Department of Oral Biology, Faculty of Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway. Electronic address: homanz@odont.uio.no.
[Ti] Title:Microbial Analysis of Endodontic Infections in Root-filled Teeth with Apical Periodontitis before and after Irrigation Using Pyrosequencing.
[So] Source:J Endod;44(3):372-378, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3554
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The root canal microbiota in root-filled teeth with post-treatment apical periodontitis before and after chemomechanical instrumentation and irrigation with either 1% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl) or 2% chlorhexidine digluconate were analyzed by using the pyrosequencing method. METHODS: Samples from 10 root-filled teeth with apical periodontitis undergoing retreatment were taken before (S1) and after (S2) preparation using irrigation with either NaOCl (n=5) or 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (n=5). DNA was extracted, and the 16S rRNA gene (V3-V5) variable regions were amplified and subjected to pyrosequencing (GS junior 454) to determine the bacterial composition. RESULTS: Pyrosequencing yielded 43,797 sequence reads in S1 and 9196 in S2 samples. Overall, 125 bacterial species belonging to 68 genera (S1, 59; S2, 38) and 9 phyla were found. The most abundant and prevalent phyla in S1 and S2 samples were Firmicutes, Fusobacteria, Bacteroidetes, and Actinobacteria. The most represented, abundant, and prevalent genera in S1 and S2 samples were Streptococcus and Fusobacterium. The most prevalent species in S1 and S2 samples were Fusobacterium nucleatum ss. vincentii, Streptococcus oralis/mitis, Streptococcus intermedius, and Streptococcus gordonii. The mean number of species per root canal was 20 (range, 4-37) in S1 and 9 (range, 4-15) in S2, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: A high interindividual diversity was observed in both S1 and S2 samples, with no difference between the two irrigation groups. F. nucleatum ss. vincentii and some Streptococcus species were the most prevalent species in pre-preparation and post-preparation samples duringretreatment of root-filled teeth with infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:In-Process

  6 / 31433 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521196
[Au] Autor:Itabe H; Kato R; Sasabe N; Obama T; Yamamoto M
[Ad] Address:Division of Biological Chemistry, Department of Molecular Biology, Showa University School of Pharmacy, Tokyo. Japan.
[Ti] Title:Significance of oxidized low-density lipoprotein in body fluids as a marker related to diseased conditions.
[So] Source:Curr Med Chem;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1875-533X
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) is known to be involved in various diseases, including cardiovascular diseases. The presence of oxLDL in the human circulatory system and in atherosclerotic lesions has been demonstrated using monoclonal antibodies. Studies have shown the significance of circulating oxLDL in various systemic diseases, including acute myocardial infarction and diabetic mellitus. Several different enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) procedures to measure oxLDL were utilized. Evidence has been accumulating that reveals changes in oxLDL levels under certain pathological conditions. Since oxLDL concentration tends to correlate with low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol, the ratio of oxLDL and LDL rather than oxLDL concentration alone has been focused attention. In addition to circulating plasma, LDL and oxLDL are found in gingival crevicular fluid (GCF), where the ratio of oxLDL to LDL in GCF is much higher than in plasma. LDL and oxLDL levels in GCF show an increase in diabetic patients and periodontal patients, suggesting that GCF might be useful in examining systemic conditions. GCF oxLDL increased when the teeth were affected by periodontitis. It is likely that oxLDL levels in plasma and GCF could reflect oxidative stress and transfer efficacy in circulatory system.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2174/0929867325666180307114855

  7 / 31433 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520950
[Au] Autor:Wong RL; Hiyari S; Yaghsezian A; Davar M; Casarin M; Lin YL; Tetradis S; Camargo PM; Pirih FQ
[Ad] Address:University of California, Los Angeles, Section of Periodontics, Los Angeles, California.
[Ti] Title:Early intervention of peri-implantitis and periodontitis utilizing a mouse model.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory response to bacterial biofilm resulting in bone loss and can ultimately lead to implant failure. Due to the lack of predictable treatments available, a thorough understanding of peri-implantitis's pathogenesis is essential. The objective of this study is to evaluate and compare the response of acute induced peri-implantitis and periodontitis lesions after insult removal. METHODS: Implants were placed in one-month-old C57BL/6J male mice eight weeks post extraction of their left maxillary molars. Once osseointegrated, ligatures were placed around the implants and contralateral second molars of the experimental groups. Controls did not receive ligatures. After one week, half of the ligatures were removed, creating the ligature-retained and ligature-removed groups. Mice were sacrificed at two time points, five and fourteen days, from ligature removal. The specimens were analyzed via micro-computed tomography and histology. RESULTS: By five and fourteen days after ligature removal, the periodontitis group experienced significant bone gain, while the peri-implantitis group did not. Histologically, all implant groups exhibited higher levels of cellular infiltrate than any of the tooth groups. Osteoclast numbers increased in peri-implantitis and periodontitis ligature-retained groups, and decreased following insult removal. Collagen was overall more disorganized in peri-implantitis than periodontitis for all groups. Peri-implantitis experimental groups revealed greater matrix metalloproteinase-8 and NF-kB levels than periodontitis. CONCLUSIONS: Implants respond slower and less favorably to insult removal than teeth. Future research is needed to characterize detailed peri-implantitis disease pathophysiology. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0541

  8 / 31433 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520843
[Au] Autor:Bletsa A; Abdalla H; Les S; Berggreen E
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Dentistry, University of Bergen, Norway.
[Ti] Title:Lymphatic growth factors are expressed in human gingiva and upregulated in gingival fibroblasts after stimulation.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The lymphatic growth factors vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) -C and -D are important for maintenance and growth of lymphatic vessels (lymphangiogenesis), but their localization in human gingiva is unknown. This study investigated the expression of VEGF-C and -D in human gingiva and isolated human gingival fibroblasts (HGFs). In addition, the localization of their main receptor VEGFR-3 was explored. METHODS: Non-inflamed gingiva from 6 donors was used for immunohistochemistry or isolation of HGFs. HGFs were stimulated with either E.coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or IL-6/soluble IL-6 receptor (sIL-6R) complex for 1, 6 and 24hours. Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (q-RT-PCR) was used to quantify the relative changes in gene expression of VEGF-A, -C and -D and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for quantification of protein levels. RESULTS: VEGF-C, -D and VEGFR-3 were seen in keratinocytes, blood vessels and in scattered single cells in gingiva. VEGFR-3 was also found in lymphatic vessels and VEGF-C in cells with fibroblastic appearance. Gene analysis showed no expression of VEGF-D in the HGFs, but constitutive expression of VEGF-C and -A. Stimulation of HGFs with LPS or IL-6/sIL-6R complex was followed by gene upregulation of VEGF-C and -A and increased protein levels in cell culture supernatant (p ≤ 0,05). CONCLUSIONS: The localization of VEGF-C, -D and VEGFR-3 expression imply that signaling via VEGFR-3 is linked to vascular homeostasis and keratinocyte function under normal conditions in gingiva. Inflammatory stimulation of HGFs upregulates VEGF-C and- A expression and may contribute to angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0400

  9 / 31433 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520828
[Au] Autor:Delange N; Lindsay S; Lemus H; Finlayson TL; Kelley ST; Gottlieb RA
[Ad] Address:San Diego State University, Graduate School of Public Health, Division of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, San Diego, CA.
[Ti] Title:Periodontal disease and its connection to systemic biomarkers of cardiovascular disease in young American Indian/Alaskan natives.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;89(2):219-227, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Periodontal disease has been shown to be associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD). No known studies evaluate the relationship between periodontal disease status and biomarkers of CVD risk in the American Indian/Alaskan Native (AI/AN) population despite their disproportionately high rates of poor oral health and cardiovascular disease-related outcomes. This study compared levels of interleukin (IL)-6 and C-reactive protein (CRP) across increasing severity of periodontal disease status among younger adults between the ages of 21 and 43 years. METHODS: Plasma levels of IL-6 and CRP were measured in adult participants (ages 21 to 43 years) as part of a study of periodontal disease and CVD risk among an AI/AN population in southern California (n=59). Periodontal evaluations were performed and disease status was classified into three categories based on highest probing depth (none/mild:<3mm; moderate: 4 to 5mm; severe: ≥6mm). Participants with known systemic disease or active infection were excluded. RESULTS: Severe periodontitis was significantly associated with increased levels of IL-6 compared with those with none or mild periodontitis before controlling for other variables (P=0.02), but lacked significance after controlling for sex, BMI, smoking status, and high-density lipoprotein (P=0.09). Moderate periodontal disease was positively associated with IL-6 levels after controlling for potential confounders (P=0.01). Periodontal status was not associated with CRP, before or after adjusting for covariates. CONCLUSIONS: In this otherwise healthy AI/AN adult sample, moderate periodontal disease compared with none or mild periodontal disease was associated with increased levels of IL-6. High levels of CRP found in this population warrant further research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0319

  10 / 31433 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520827
[Au] Autor:Beck JD; Moss KL; Morelli T; Offenbacher S
[Ad] Address:Department of Dental Ecology, School of Dentistry, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC.
[Ti] Title:In search of appropriate measures of periodontal status: The Periodontal Profile Phenotype (P ) system.
[So] Source:J Periodontol;89(2):166-175, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1943-3670
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: This paper focuses on Periodontal Profile Class (PPC), a component of the Periodontal Profile Phenotype (P ) System that may be more representative of the periodontitis phenotype than current case definitions of periodontitis. Data illustrate the unique aspects of the PPC compared with other commonly used periodontal classification indices. METHODS: Latent Class Analysis (LCA) identified discrete classes of individuals grouped by tooth-level clinical parameters. The analysis defined seven distinct periodontal profile classes (PPC A through G) and seven distinct tooth profile classes (TPC A through G). This LCA classification was an entirely data-derived agnostic process without any preconceived presumptions of what constituted disease. RESULTS: Comparing the PPC with the Centers for Disease Control/American Academy of Periodontology (CDC/AAP) and European indices, the PPC is unique in that it contains four disease classes not traditionally used. Less than half of individuals classified as Healthy by both the CDC/AAP and European indices were Healthy using the PPC. About 25% of those classified as Severe by CDC/AAP and European indices were PPC-Severe. The remainder spread out over the High Gingival Index, Posterior Disease, Tooth Loss, and Severe Tooth Loss phenotypes. CONCLUSIONS: The PPC classification provides a significant departure from the traditional clinical case status indices that have been used, but has resulted in clinical phenotypes that are quite familiar to most clinicians who take notice of the distribution of missing teeth, areas of recession, diminished periodontal support, and other aspects of the dentition while conducting a periodontal examination. The mutually exclusive categories provided by the PPC system provide periodontal clinical summaries that can be an important component of precision dentistry.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/JPER.17-0424


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