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[PMID]: 29524806
[Au] Autor:Drumond N; Stegemann S
[Ad] Address:Graz University of Technology, Inffeldgasse 13, 8010 Graz, Austria. Electronic address: nelio.drumondfreitas@tugraz.at.
[Ti] Title:Polymer adhesion predictions for oral dosage forms to enhance drug administration safety. Part 3: Review of in vitro and in vivo methods used to predict esophageal adhesion and transit time.
[So] Source:Colloids Surf B Biointerfaces;165:303-314, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4367
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The oral cavity is frequently used to administer pharmaceutical drug products. This route of administration is seen as the most accessible for the majority of patients and supports an independent therapy management. For current oral dosage forms under development, the prediction of their unintended mucoadhesive properties and esophageal transit profiles would contribute for future administration safety, as concerns regarding unintended adhesion of solid oral dosage forms (SODF) during oro-esophageal transit still remain. Different in vitro methods that access mucoadhesion of polymers and pharmaceutical preparations have been proposed over the years. The same methods might be used to test non-adhesive systems and contribute for developing safe-to-swallow technologies. Previous works have already investigated the suitability of non-animal derived in vitro methods to assess such properties. The aim of this work was to review the in vitro methodology available in the scientific literature that used animal esophageal tissue to evaluate mucoadhesion and esophageal transit of pharmaceutical preparations. Furthermore, in vivo methodology is also discussed. Since none of the in vitro methods developed are able to mimic the complex swallowing process and oro-esophageal transit, in vivo studies in humans remain as the gold standard.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 135305 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524770
[Au] Autor:Bakonyi M; Gácsi A; Kovács A; Szucs MB; Berkó S; Csányi E
[Ad] Address:Institute of Pharmaceutical Technology and Regulatory Affairs, University of Szeged, Szeged, H-6720, Hungary.
[Ti] Title:Following-up skin penetration of lidocaine from different vehicles by Raman spectroscopic mapping.
[So] Source:J Pharm Biomed Anal;154:1-6, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1873-264X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The application of local anesthetics, usually administered by subcutaneous injection, is common in the course of diagnostic, therapeutic, and cosmetic dermatology procedures. The effective dermal delivery of lidocaine could offer a solution to many adverse effects caused by needle insertion, such as pain, local reactions or toxicity, and additionally, it avoids the disruption of anatomical landmarks. Therefore, novel dermal formulations of local anesthetics are needed to overcome the barrier function of the skin and provide sufficient and prolonged anesthesia. In our study, we aimed to investigate and compare the penetration profiles of four different lidocaine containing formulations (hydrogel, oleogel, lyotropic liquid crystal and nanostructured lipid carrier) by Raman microscopic mapping of the drug. The application of Raman spectroscopy provided information about the spatial distribution of lidocaine in the skin ex vivo. The penetration of lidocaine from lyotropic liquid crystal and nanostructured carrier reached deeper skin layers and a higher amount of the drug was diffused into the skin, compared with hydrogel and oleogel. This study confirmed that nanostructured carriers can improve skin penetration properties of lidocaine and proved the applicability of Raman spectroscopy in the research of dermatological preparations ex vivo as a nondestructive, relatively easy and fast technique.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 135305 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522908
[Au] Autor:Melamed IR; Borte M; Trawnicek L; Kobayashi AL; Kobayashi RH; Knutsen A; Gupta S; Smits W; Pituch-Noworolska A; Strach M; Pulka G; Ochs HD; Moy JN
[Ad] Address:IMMUNOe Research Center, 6801 S. Yosemite street, Centennial, CO 80112, USA. Electronic address: melamedi@immunoe.com.
[Ti] Title:Pharmacokinetics of a novel human intravenous immunoglobulin 10% in patients with primary immunodeficiency diseases: Analysis of a phase III, multicentre, prospective, open-label study.
[So] Source:Eur J Pharm Sci;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0720
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy is commonly used to treat patients with primary antibody deficiency. This prospective, open-label, non-randomised, multicentre, phase III trial investigated the pharmacokinetics of a new 10% liquid IVIG product (panzyga®; Octapharma) in 51 patients aged 2-75 years with common variable immunodeficiency (n = 43) or X-linked agammaglobulinaemia (n = 8). Patients were treated with IVIG 10% every 3 (n = 21) or 4 weeks (n = 30) at a dose of 200-800 mg/kg for 12 months. Total immunoglobulin G (IgG) and subclass concentrations approximately doubled from pre- to 15 min post-infusion. The maximum concentration of total IgG (mean ±â€¯SD) was 21.82 ±â€¯5.83 g/L in patients treated 3-weekly and 17.42 ±â€¯3.34 g/L in patients treated 4-weekly. Median trough IgG concentrations were nearly constant over the course of the study, remaining between 11.0 and 12.2 g/L for patients on the 3-week schedule and between 8.10 and 8.65 g/L for patients on the 4-week schedule. The median terminal half-life of total IgG was 36.1 (range 18.5-65.9) days, with generally similar values for the IgG subclasses (26.7-38.0 days). Median half-lives for specific antibodies ranged between 21.3 and 51.2 days for anti-cytomegalovirus, anti-Haemophilus influenzae, anti-measles, anti-tetanus toxoid, anti-varicella zoster virus antibodies, and anti-Streptococcus pneumoniae subtype antibodies. Overall, IVIG 10% demonstrated pharmacokinetic properties similar to those of other commercial IVIG 10% preparations and 3- or 4-weekly administration achieved sufficient concentrations of IgG, IgG subclasses, and specific antibodies, exceeding the recommended level needed to effectively prevent serious bacterial infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 135305 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29446584
[Au] Autor:Sosedova LM; Novikov MA; Titov EA; Rukavishnikov VS
[Ti] Title:[Induction of apoptosis in neurons of white rats under exposure of nanobiocomposite based on ag (0) nanoparticles and arabinogalactan].
[So] Source:Gig Sanit;95(12):1210-13, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0016-9900
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:There are presented results of the immunohistochemical study of neural tissue of outbred albino rats exposed for 9 days to the influence of the silver nanobiocomposite consisted of silver nanoparticles encapsulated into a matrix of a natural polymer - arabinogalactan. The research of albino rats was performed in 2 stages: half of the rats in each groups were decapitated immediately after the exposure (early period) and the rest animals - 6 months after the end of exposure (remote period). The impact of the studied substance was proved to cause functional changes in cells of the nervous tissue. After the subacute administration of the nanobiocomposite - argentum-arabinogalactan (nano-Ag-AG) in cells of the nervous tissue of the brain of albino rats the expression of apoptotic and anti-apoptotic protein (caspase-3 and bcl-2) was established to be changed. The number of normal neurons producing protein caspase-3 sharply increases. Herewith the number of immunonegative neurons fairly declines. Along with this there is noted the high level of bcl-2 content, one function ofwhich is the preclusion ofapoptosis. In preparations there is revealed a significant gain in the number of bcl-2 expressing neurons, however, the protective effect of the protein is not fully realized, that leads to the significantly increase in the content of damaged hyperchromatic cells. The evaluation of results of the immunohistochemical study of the nervous tissue of albino rats according to data concerning the proteins caspase-3 and bcl-2 expression permits to make a conclusion about the capability of nanoargentum encapsulated into polymer matrix by passing the blood-brain barrier to induce the triggering apoptosis cascade in neurons of the cerebral cortex.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain
Galactans/pharmacology
Larix
Metal Nanoparticles/adverse effects
Silver
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Apoptosis/drug effects
Biopolymers/pharmacology
Blood-Brain Barrier/metabolism
Brain/drug effects
Brain/pathology
Brain/physiopathology
Caspase 3/metabolism
Immunohistochemistry
Models, Animal
Plant Preparations/pharmacology
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2/metabolism
Rats
Silver/adverse effects
Silver/pharmacology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biopolymers); 0 (Galactans); 0 (Plant Preparations); 0 (Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-bcl-2); 3M4G523W1G (Silver); EC 3.4.22.- (Caspase 3); SL4SX1O487 (arabinogalactan)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180216
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  5 / 135305 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29431542
[Au] Autor:Smit C; De Hoogd S; Brüggemann RJM; Knibbe CAJ
[Ad] Address:a Department of Clinical Pharmacy , St. Antonius Hospital , Nieuwegein , The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Obesity and drug pharmacology: a review of the influence of obesity on pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters.
[So] Source:Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol;14(3):275-285, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1744-7607
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The rising prevalence of obesity confronts clinicians with dosing problems in the (extreme) overweight population. Obesity has a great impact on key organs that play a role in the pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) of drugs, however the ultimate impact of these changes on how to adapt the dose may not always be known. Areas covered: In this review, physiological changes associated with obesity are discussed. An overview is provided on the alterations in absorption, distribution, drug metabolism and clearance in (morbid) obesity focusing on general principles that can be extracted from pharmacokinetic studies. Also, relevant pharmacodynamic considerations in obesity are discussed. Expert opinion: Over the last two decades, increased knowledge is generated on PK and PD in obesity. Future research should focus on filling in the knowledge gaps that remain, especially in connecting obesity-related physiological changes with changes in PK and/or PD and vice versa. Ultimately, this knowledge can be used to develop physiologically based PK and PD models on the basis of quantitative systems pharmacology principles. Moreover, efforts should focus on thorough prospective evaluation of developed model-based doses with subsequent implementation of these dosing recommendations in clinical practice.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Obesity, Morbid/metabolism
Obesity/metabolism
Pharmaceutical Preparations/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Humans
Models, Biological
Pharmaceutical Preparations/administration & dosage
Pharmacokinetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Pharmaceutical Preparations)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/17425255.2018.1440287

  6 / 135305 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29214535
[Au] Autor:Mijangos L; Ziarrusta H; Olivares M; Zuloaga O; Möder M; Etxebarria N; Prieto A
[Ad] Address:Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of the Basque Country (UPV/EHU), P.O. Box 644, 48080, Bilbao, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Simultaneous determination of 41 multiclass organic pollutants in environmental waters by means of polyethersulfone microextraction followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.
[So] Source:Anal Bioanal Chem;410(2):615-632, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1618-2650
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A new procedure using polyethersulfone (PES) microextraction followed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis was developed in this work for the simultaneous determination of 41 multiclass priority and emerging organic pollutants including herbicides, hormones, personal care products, and pharmaceuticals, among others, in seawater, wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents, and estuary samples. The optimization of the analysis included two different chromatographic columns and different variables (polarity, fragmentor voltage, collision energy, and collision cell accelerator) of the mass spectrometer. In the case of PES extraction, ion strength of the water, pH, addition of EDTA, and the amount of the polymeric material were thoroughly investigated. The developed procedure was compared with a previously validated one based on a standard solid-phase extraction (SPE). In contrast to the SPE protocol, the PES method allowed a cost-efficient extraction of complex aqueous samples with lower matrix effect from 120 mL of water sample. Satisfactory and comparable apparent recovery values (80-119 and 70-131%) and method quantification limits (MQLs, 0.4-26 and 0.2-23 ng/L) were obtained for PES and SPE procedures, respectively, regardless of the matrix. Repeatability values lower than 27% were obtained. Finally, the developed methods were applied to the analysis of real samples from the Basque Country and irbesartan, valsartan, acesulfame, and sucralose were the analytes most often detected at the highest concentrations (51-1096 ng/L). Graphical abstract Forty-one multiclass pollutant determination in environmental waters by means of PES/SPE-LC-MS/MS.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Herbicides/analysis
Hormones/analysis
Pharmaceutical Preparations/analysis
Polymers/chemistry
Solid Phase Extraction/methods
Sulfones/chemistry
Tandem Mass Spectrometry/methods
Water Pollutants, Chemical/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chromatography, Liquid/methods
Estuaries
Limit of Detection
Seawater/analysis
Waste Water/analysis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; VALIDATION STUDIES
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Herbicides); 0 (Hormones); 0 (Pharmaceutical Preparations); 0 (Polymers); 0 (Sulfones); 0 (Waste Water); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical); 25667-42-9 (polyether sulfone)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171208
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00216-017-0763-2

  7 / 135305 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28455844
[Au] Autor:Keshet U; Alon T; Fialkov AB; Amirav A
[Ad] Address:School of Chemistry, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, 69978, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Open Probe fast GC-MS - combining ambient sampling ultra-fast separation and in-vacuum ionization for real-time analysis.
[So] Source:J Mass Spectrom;52(7):417-426, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1096-9888
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An Open Probe inlet was combined with a low thermal mass ultra-fast gas chromatograph (GC), in-vacuum electron ionization ion source and a mass spectrometer (MS) of GC-MS for obtaining real-time analysis with separation. The Open Probe enables ambient sampling via sample vaporization in an oven that is open to room air, and the ultra-fast GC provides ~30-s separation, while if no separation is required, it can act as a transfer line with 2 to 3-s sample transfer time. Sample analysis is as simple as touching the sample, pushing the sample holder into the Open Probe oven and obtaining the results in 30 s. The Open Probe fast GC was mounted on a standard Agilent 7890 GC that was coupled with an Agilent 5977A MS. Open Probe fast GC-MS provides real-time analysis combined with GC separation and library identification, and it uses the low-cost MS of GC-MS. The operation of Open Probe fast GC-MS is demonstrated in the 30-s separation and 50-s full analysis cycle time of tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabinol in Cannabis flower, sub 1-min analysis of trace trinitrotoluene transferred from a finger onto a glass surface, vitamin E in canola oil, sterols in olive oil, polybrominated flame retardants in plastics, alprazolam in Xanax drug pill and free fatty acids and cholesterol in human blood. The extrapolated limit of detection for pyrene is <1 fg, but the concentration is too high and the software noise calculation is untrustworthy. The broad range of compounds amenable for analysis is demonstrated in the analysis of reserpine. The possible use with alternate standard GC-MS and Open Probe fast GC-MS is demonstrated in the analysis of heroin in its street drug powder. The use of Open Probe with the fast GC acting as a transfer line is demonstrated in <10-s analysis without separation of ibuprofen and estradiol. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry/instrumentation
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry/methods
Organic Chemicals/analysis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Air Ionization
Humans
Limit of Detection
Pharmaceutical Preparations/analysis
Pharmaceutical Preparations/chemistry
Street Drugs/analysis
Street Drugs/chemistry
Vacuum
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Organic Chemicals); 0 (Pharmaceutical Preparations); 0 (Street Drugs)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170430
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/jms.3941

  8 / 135305 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28450249
[Au] Autor:Kurt A; Toker OS; Tornuk F
[Ad] Address:Department of Food Engineering, Engineering Faculty, Ondokuz Mayis University, 55139, Samsun, Turkey; Department of Food Engineering, Engineering and Architecture Faculty, Bitlis Eren University, 13000 Bitlis, Turkey. Electronic address: abdullahkurt48@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Effect of xanthan and locust bean gum synergistic interaction on characteristics of biodegradable edible film.
[So] Source:Int J Biol Macromol;102:1035-1044, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present study was aimed to use different combinations of xanthan (XG) and locust bean gum (LBG) in the biodegradable edible film preparation by benefitting from their synergistic interactions for the first time. Concentrations of LBG, XG and glycerol of the optimized film sample were found to be 89.6%, 10.4% and 20%, respectively. At the optimum point the WVP, TS, E% and EM values of film were found 0.22gmmh m kPa, 86.97MPa, 33.34% and 177.25MPa, respectively. The optimized film was characterized for its physical, thermal and structural behavior. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) analyses exhibited miscibility and presence of interaction between polymers. In conclusion, XG and LBG interaction was used successfully to get biodegradable films and coatings with improved characteristics.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biocompatible Materials/chemistry
Galactans/chemistry
Mannans/chemistry
Plant Gums/chemistry
Polysaccharides, Bacterial/chemistry
Product Packaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biocompatible Materials/metabolism
Drug Compounding
Glycerol/chemistry
Mechanical Phenomena
Permeability
Rheology
Steam
Temperature
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biocompatible Materials); 0 (Galactans); 0 (Mannans); 0 (Plant Gums); 0 (Polysaccharides, Bacterial); 0 (Steam); PDC6A3C0OX (Glycerol); TTV12P4NEE (xanthan gum); V4716MY704 (locust bean gum)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 135305 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29451036
[Au] Autor:Bruyère O
[Ad] Address:a Public Health, Epidemiology and Health Economics , University of Liège , Liège , Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Pharmaceutical-grade chondroitin sulfate in the management of knee osteoarthritis.
[So] Source:Expert Opin Pharmacother;19(4):409-412, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1744-7666
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Chondroitin Sulfate (CS) is a drug which is available as pharmaceutical-grade and nutriceutical-grade products, with important variations in preparation, composition, purity and therapeutic effects. Previous studies using pharmaceutical-grade CS suggested that the compound improves pain and function and delays structural progression in knee osteoarthritis (OA), whereas discrepant results were observed when lower grade preparations were investigated. Areas covered: The recently published chondroitin versus celecoxib versus Placebo Trial (CONCEPT) assessed the symptomatic effect of pharmaceutical-grade CS 800 mg/day in symptomatic knee OA. Expert opinion: This prospective, randomized, 6-month, 3-arm, double-blind, double-dummy, placebo and celecoxib (200 mg/day) - controlled trial involved 604 patients aged above 50 years with primary knee OA. This study showed that CS is superior to placebo and similar to celecoxib in reducing pain and improving function in Kellgren-Lawrence grade 1-3 patients supporting the role of pharmaceutical-grade CS as a potential first-line treatment for the management of patients with mild to moderate knee OA.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1080/14656566.2018.1442438

  10 / 135305 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29441913
[Ti] Title:Stimulation of bone regeneration with pigment epithelium-derived factor microparticles: evidence and .
[So] Source:Pharmazie;71(7):382-389, 2016 Jul 07.
[Is] ISSN:0031-7144
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The occurrence of bone defects can be due to a variety of factors not limited to bone fractures and tumours. Most diseased bone is removed and the patient fitted with prosthetics, prior to use of certain factors such as bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) to aid healing. Recently, the protein pigment epithelium-derived factor (PEDF) and the polysaccharide chitosan have been found to have promising effects on the regeneration of bone, with the major advantage of these agents being their safety to date. A study was performed to determine whether the combination of both chitosan and PEDF would enhance greater bone regeneration effects. Post-formulation, in silico tests (particle sizing and surface charge determination) were followed by several cell-based assays (microparticle cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, mitochondrial abundance, bone mineral formation, colony formation in matrigel, and colony formation in collagen I matrix), and finally in vivo testing where microparticles were injected periosteally in the hindlimb. Collectively, these findings support the idea that PEDF microencapsulated within chitosan promotes bone regeneration, and has potential for bone trauma management. Future studies will examine the ability of this promising bone regeneration microparticle to heal bone in disease states such as fracture and tumour-mediated osteolysis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bone Regeneration/drug effects
Eye Proteins/pharmacology
Nerve Growth Factors/pharmacology
Serpins/pharmacology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Bone Density/drug effects
Capsules
Cell Survival/drug effects
Chitosan/pharmacology
Collagen Type I/pharmacology
Colony-Forming Units Assay
Computer Simulation
Drug Compounding
Eye Proteins/administration & dosage
Eye Proteins/metabolism
Hindlimb
Humans
Injections
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Mitochondria/drug effects
Nerve Growth Factors/administration & dosage
Nerve Growth Factors/metabolism
Particle Size
Serpins/administration & dosage
Serpins/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Capsules); 0 (Collagen Type I); 0 (Eye Proteins); 0 (Nerve Growth Factors); 0 (Serpins); 0 (pigment epithelium-derived factor); 9012-76-4 (Chitosan)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1691/ph.2016.6010


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