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[PMID]: 28422496
[Au] Autor:Batista ANL; Santos-Pinto JRAD; Batista JM; Souza-Moreira TM; Santoni MM; Zanelli CF; Kato MJ; López SN; Palma MS; Furlan M
[Ad] Address:Instituto de Química, Universidade Estadual Paulista (Unesp) , Araraquara, SP 14800-060, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:The Combined Use of Proteomics and Transcriptomics Reveals a Complex Secondary Metabolite Network in Peperomia obtusifolia.
[So] Source:J Nat Prod;80(5):1275-1286, 2017 May 26.
[Is] ISSN:1520-6025
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Peperomia obtusifolia, an ornamental plant from the Piperaceae family, accumulates a series of secondary metabolites with interesting biological properties. From a biosynthesis standpoint, this species produces several benzopyrans derived from orsellinic acid, which is a polyketide typically found in fungi. Additionally, the chiral benzopyrans were reported as racemic and/or as diastereomeric mixtures, which raises questions about the level of enzymatic control in the cyclization step for the formation of the 3,4-dihydro-2H-pyran moiety. Therefore, this article describes the use of shotgun proteomic and transcriptome studies as well as phytochemical profiling for the characterization of the main biosynthesis pathways active in P. obtusifolia. This combined approach resulted in the identification of a series of proteins involved in its secondary metabolism, including tocopherol cyclase and prenyltransferases. The activity of these enzymes was supported by the phytochemical profiling performed in different organs of P. obtusifolia. However, the polyketide synthases possibly involved in the production of orsellinic acid could not be identified, suggesting that orsellinic acid may be produced by endophytes intimately associated with the plant.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Benzopyrans/chemistry
Endophytes/chemistry
Fungi/chemistry
Peperomia/chemistry
Plant Leaves/chemistry
Polyketide Synthases/metabolism
Resorcinols/chemistry
Transcriptome/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Biosynthetic Pathways
Endophytes/metabolism
Fungi/metabolism
Molecular Structure
Polyketide Synthases/chemistry
Proteomics/methods
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Benzopyrans); 0 (Resorcinols); 11XLA0494B (orsellinic acid); 79956-01-7 (Polyketide Synthases)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170925
[Lr] Last revision date:170925
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170419
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1021/acs.jnatprod.6b00827

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Romoff, Paulete
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[PMID]: 28906474
[Au] Autor:Tamayose CI; Romoff P; Toyama DO; Gaeta HH; Costa CRC; Belchor MN; Ortolan BD; Velozo LSM; Kaplan MAC; Ferreira MJP; Toyama MH
[Ad] Address:Curso de Química, Universidade Presbiteriana Mackenzie, Rua da Consolação, São Paulo 01302-907, Brazil. cinthiatamay@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Non-Clinical Studies for Evaluation of 8-C-Rhamnosyl Apigenin Purified from Peperomia obtusifolia against Acute Edema.
[So] Source:Int J Mol Sci;18(9), 2017 Sep 14.
[Is] ISSN:1422-0067
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Compound 8- -rhamnosyl apigenin (8CR) induced a moderate reduction in the enzymatic activity of secretory phospholipase A2 (sPLA2) from and cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2), but the compound also significantly inhibited the enzymatic activity of the enzyme cyclooxygenase. In vitro assays showed that the compound induced a slight change in the secondary structure of sPLA2 from snake venom. In vivo assays were divided into two steps. In the first step, the 8CR compound was administered by intraperitoneal injections 30 min prior to administration of sPLA2. In this condition, 8CR inhibited edema and myonecrosis induced by the sPLA2 activity of in a dose-dependent manner by decreasing interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß), tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), and lipid peroxidation. This has been demonstrated by monitoring the levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) in rat paws after the course of edema induced by sPLA2. These results, for the first time, show that sPLA2 of venom induces massive muscle damage, as well as significant edema by mobilization of cyclooxygenase enzymes. Additionally, its pharmacological activity involves increased lipid peroxidation as well as TNF-α and IL-1ß production. Previous administration by the peritoneal route has shown that dose-dependent 8CR significantly decreases the enzymatic activity of cyclooxygenase enzymes. This resulted in a decrease of the amount of bioactive lipids involved in inflammation; it also promoted a significant cellular protection against lipid peroxidation. In vivo experiments performed with 8CR at a concentration adjusted to 200 µg (8 mg/kg) of intraperitoneal injection 15 min after sPLA2 injection significantly reduced sPLA2 edema and the myotoxic effect induced by sPLA2 through the decrease in the enzymatic activity of cPLA2, cyclooxygenase, and a massive reduction of lipid peroxidation. These results clearly show that 8CR is a potent anti-inflammatory that inhibits cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and it may modulate the enzymatic activity of sPLA2 and cPLA2. In addition, it was shown that sPLA2 increases cell oxidative stress during edema and myonecrosis, and the antioxidant properties of the polyphenolic compound may be significant in mitigating the pharmacological effect induced by sPLA2 and other snake venom toxins.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170914
[Lr] Last revision date:170914
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28882070
[Au] Autor:Macedo AL; Duprat RC; Moreira DL; Kaplan MAC; Vasconcelos TRA; Pinto LC; Montenegro RC; Ratcliffe NA; Mello CB; Valverde AL
[Ad] Address:a Departamento de Química Orgânica, Instituto de Química , Universidade Federal Fluminense , Niterói , Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Isolation of a larvicidal compound from Piper solmsianum C.DC. (Piperaceae).
[So] Source:Nat Prod Res;:1-4, 2017 Sep 08.
[Is] ISSN:1478-6427
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The Aedes aegypti mosquito is one of the major vectors of arboviruses. These diseases have re-emerged and the insecticides used nowadays are toxic to mammals and environment and have only been effective in the short-term. In this context, natural products are an alternative. The genus Piper has many active compounds against arthropods, including neolignans. The present study evaluated the larvicidal potential of the n-hexanic extract of Piper solmsianum and eupomatenoid-6, identified by GC-MS and NMR techniques, from this extract against Ae. aegypti. The crude extract (100 µg/mL) killed 80% and 98.3% of larvae in the first and third day, respectively. Eupomatenoid-6 exhibited LD of 19.33 µM and LD of 28.68 µM and was then assayed in human fibroblast cells (MRC5), showing an IC of 39.30 µM with estimated LD of 42.26 mmol/kg. Our results indicate eupomatenoid-6 as a potent insecticide with relatively low toxicity for mammals.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170908
[Lr] Last revision date:170908
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/14786419.2017.1374265

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[PMID]: 28868919
[Au] Autor:Yuan Y; Yang JX; Nie LH; Li BL; Qin XB; Wu JW; Qiu SX
[Ad] Address:a Program for Natural Products Chemical Biology, Key Laboratory of Plant Resources Conservation and Sustainable Utilization, Guangdong Provincial Key Laboratory of Applied Botany, South China Botanical Garden , Chinese Academy of Sciences , Guangzhou 570650 , China.
[Ti] Title:Three new kavalactone dimers from Piper methysticum (kava).
[So] Source:J Asian Nat Prod Res;:1-7, 2017 Sep 04.
[Is] ISSN:1477-2213
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Three new dimeric kavalactones, designated as diyangonins A-C (1-3), along with two known analogs were isolated from the roots of Piper methysticum. Their structures were elucidated by means of extensive analysis of their 1D, 2D NMR, and mass spectroscopic data. All these dimers possess a skeleton featuring a cyclobutane ring connecting two kavalactone units in head-to-tail or head-to-head mode. Compounds 1-5 were evaluated for their cytotoxic activities against human tumor cell lines.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170904
[Lr] Last revision date:170904
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/10286020.2017.1367768

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[PMID]: 28837061
[Au] Autor:Zhou J; Chen X; Cui Y; Sun W; Li Y; Wang Y; Song J; Yao H
[Ad] Address:Key Lab of Chinese Medicine Resources Conservation, State Administration of Traditional Chinese Medicine of the People's Republic of China, Institute of Medicinal Plant Development, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College, Beijing 100193, China. jgzhou1316@163.com.
[Ti] Title:Molecular Structure and Phylogenetic Analyses of Complete Chloroplast Genomes of Two Aristolochia Medicinal Species.
[So] Source:Int J Mol Sci;18(9), 2017 Aug 24.
[Is] ISSN:1422-0067
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The family Aristolochiaceae, comprising about 600 species of eight genera, is a unique plant family containing aristolochic acids (AAs). The complete chloroplast genome sequences of and are reported here. The results show that the complete chloroplast genomes of and comprise circular 159,793 and 160,576 bp-long molecules, respectively and have typical quadripartite structures. The GC contents of both species were 38.3% each. A total of 131 genes were identified in each genome including 85 protein-coding genes, 37 tRNA genes, eight rRNA genes and one pseudogene ( ). The simple-sequence repeat sequences mainly comprise A/T mononucletide repeats. Phylogenetic analyses using maximum parsimony (MP) revealed that and had a close phylogenetic relationship with species of the family Piperaceae, as well as Laurales and Magnoliales. The data obtained in this study will be beneficial for further investigations on and from the aspect of evolution, and chloroplast genetic engineering.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170824
[Lr] Last revision date:170824
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 28273402
[Au] Autor:Dorla E; Gauvin-Bialecki A; Deuscher Z; Allibert A; Grondin I; Deguine JP; Laurent P
[Ad] Address:Laboratoire de Chimie des Substances Naturelles et des Sciences des Aliments (LCSNSA), Université de La Réunion, Avenue René Cassin-CS, 92003-97744, Saint-Denis Cedex 9, France.
[Ti] Title:Insecticidal Activity of the Leaf Essential Oil of Peperomia borbonensis Miq. (Piperaceae) and Its Major Components against the Melon Fly Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae).
[So] Source:Chem Biodivers;14(6), 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1612-1880
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The essential oil from the leaves of Peperomia borbonensis from Réunion Island was obtained by hydrodistillation and characterized using GC-FID, GC/MS and NMR. The main components were myristicin (39.5%) and elemicin (26.6%). The essential oil (EO) of Peperomia borbonensis and its major compounds (myristicin and elemicin), pure or in a mixture, were evaluated for their insecticidal activity against Bactrocera cucurbitae (Diptera: Tephritidae) using a filter paper impregnated bioassay. The concentrations necessary to kill 50% (LC ) and 90% (LC ) of the flies in three hours were determined. The LC value was 0.23 ± 0.009 mg/cm and the LC value was 0.34 ± 0.015 mg/cm for the EO. The median lethal time (LT ) was determined to compare the toxicity of EO and the major constituents. The EO was the most potent insecticide (LT  = 98 ± 2 min), followed by the mixture of myristicin and elemicin (1.4:1) (LT  = 127 ± 2 min) indicating that the efficiency of the EO is potentiated by minor compounds and emphasizing one of the major assets of EOs against pure molecules.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Insecticides/isolation & purification
Oils, Volatile/chemistry
Peperomia/chemistry
Plant Leaves/chemistry
Tephritidae/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Benzyl Compounds/isolation & purification
Benzyl Compounds/toxicity
Dioxolanes/isolation & purification
Dioxolanes/toxicity
Diptera/drug effects
Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry
Insecticides/pharmacology
Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy
Pyrogallol/analogs & derivatives
Pyrogallol/isolation & purification
Pyrogallol/toxicity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Benzyl Compounds); 0 (Dioxolanes); 0 (Insecticides); 0 (Oils, Volatile); 01Y4A2QXY0 (Pyrogallol); 04PD6CT78W (myristicin); 487-11-6 (elemicin)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170822
[Lr] Last revision date:170822
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170308
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/cbdv.201600493

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[PMID]: 28160848
[Au] Autor:Einbond LS; Negrin A; Kulakowski DM; Wu HA; Antonetti V; Jalees F; Law W; Roller M; Redenti S; Kennelly EJ; Balick MJ
[Ad] Address:The Institute of Economic Botany, The New York Botanical Garden, Bronx, NY 10458, USA; Lehman College, The City University of New York, Bronx, NY 10468, USA; Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, NY 10032, USA. Electronic address: lseinbond@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Traditional preparations of kava (Piper methysticum) inhibit the growth of human colon cancer cells in vitro.
[So] Source:Phytomedicine;24:1-13, 2017 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1618-095X
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Epidemiological studies indicate there is low incidence of colon cancer in the South Pacific islands, including Fiji, West Samoa, and Vanuatu. Cancer incidence has been shown to be inversely associated with kava (Piper methysticum G. Forst.) ingestion. Hypothesis/Purpose: Kava prepared traditionally will inhibit the growth of human cancer cells. This investigation entails preparation and analysis of kava extracts and study of the growth inhibitory activity of the extracts, alone and combined with hibiscus. STUDY DESIGN: We will prepare kava as in Micronesia - as a water extract, high in particulate content, alone or combined with sea hibiscus (Hibiscus tiliaceus L.) - and examine the components and growth inhibitory activity. METHODS: We obtained ground kava prepared in the traditional way from lateral roots and sea hibiscus mucilage and sap from different sources in Micronesia, and prepared water extracts (unfiltered, as well as filtered, since in traditional use the kava beverage contains a high particulate content) and partitions. We used the MTT assay to determine the growth inhibitory activity of the preparations on colon and breast cancer cells and nonmalignant intestinal epithelial cells. LC-MS analysis was used to examine the components of the kava and sea hibiscus extracts and partitions. RESULTS: Traditional preparations of kava inhibit the growth of breast and colon cancer cells. Among the kava preparations, the order of decreasing activity was Fiji(2), Fiji(1), Hawaii; the unfiltered preparations from Fiji were more active than the filtered. Phytochemical analysis indicated that filtering reduced most kavalactone and chalcone content. For example, for Fiji(2), the ratio of dihydromethysticin in filtered/unfiltered kava was 0.01. Thus, for the extracts from Fiji, growth inhibitory activity correlates with the content of these compounds. Unfiltered and filtered kava from Fiji(1) were more active on malignant than nonmalignant intestinal epithelial cells. Since kava is prepared in Micronesia by squeezing the extract through sea hibiscus bark, we assayed the growth inhibitory activity of combinations of kava and sea hibiscus sap and found that sea hibiscus enhanced the growth inhibitory effect of kava. CONCLUSION: Our results show that traditional kava, alone or combined with sea hibiscus, displays activity against human cancer cells and indicate it will be worthwhile to develop and further analyze these preparations to prevent and treat colon and other cancers. Our findings suggest it is important to examine the activity of plants in the form that people consume them.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Colonic Neoplasms/drug therapy
Hibiscus/chemistry
Kava/chemistry
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
Plant Growth Regulators/pharmacology
Pyrones/pharmacology
Tumor Cells, Cultured/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Colonic Neoplasms/epidemiology
Fiji/epidemiology
Humans
Mass Spectrometry
Phytotherapy
Plant Roots/chemistry
Samoa/epidemiology
Vanuatu/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Plant Growth Regulators); 0 (Pyrones)
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170817
[Lr] Last revision date:170817
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170205
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 441 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28774184
[Au] Autor:Anderson RR; Girola N; Figueiredo CR; Londero VS; Lago JHG
[Ad] Address:a Departamento de Ciências Exatas e da Terra , Universidade Federal de São Paulo , Diadema , Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Circadian variation and in vitro cytotoxic activity evaluation of volatile compounds from leaves of Piper regnellii (Miq) C. DC. var. regnellii (C. DC.) Yunck (Piperaceae).
[So] Source:Nat Prod Res;:1-4, 2017 Aug 03.
[Is] ISSN:1478-6427
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aiming detection of circadian variation in the chemical composition of volatiles from Piper regnellii, the leaves were collected during four different periods (8, 12, 16 and 20 h) in the same day. After extraction by hydrodistillation and GC/MS analysis, no significant variation was observed for the main compounds: germacrene D (45.6 ± 1.5-51.4 ± 3.1%), α-chamigrene (8.9 ± 1.3-11.3 ± 2.7%) and ß-caryophyllene (8.2 ± 0.9-9.5 ± 0.3%). Evaluation of in vitro cytotoxicity against several cancer and non-tumourigenic cells indicated promising activity, especially to HeLa (human cervical carcinoma) with IC ranging from 11 ± 3 to 17 ± 3 µg/mL. The obtained volatile oils were pooled and subjected to fractionation to afford pure ß-caryophyllene, α-chamigrene and germacrene D, being this last compound the more active against HeLa cells with IC of 7 ± 1 µg/mL (34 ± 5 µM). Therefore, the predominance of germacrene D in all analysed oils could justify, at least in part, the activity observed for the volatile compounds from P. regnellii leaves.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170804
[Lr] Last revision date:170804
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/14786419.2017.1361952

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[PMID]: 28249821
[Au] Autor:Jayakumar S; Sathiskumar S; Baskaran N; Arumugam R; Vanitha V
[Ad] Address:P.G. and Research Department of Zoology and Wildlife Biology, A.V.C. College (Autonomous), Mannampandal, Tamil Nadu, India. Electronic address: jayakumar.sacon@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Ethno-veterinary practices in Southern India for captive Asian elephant ailments.
[So] Source:J Ethnopharmacol;200:182-204, 2017 Mar 22.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7573
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:ETHENOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: India has a long tradition of practicing Ayurvedic medicine not only for human ailments, but also for the management of livestock in the form of ethno-veterinary practices. Asian elephant is a significant part of Indian culture, and ethno-veterinary practices have extended to manage and cure various ailments of Asian elephant in captivity. Much of this knowledge has been lost in the light of modern practices. AIM OF THE STUDY: This study is aimed at documenting the existing knowledge on ethno-veterinary medicines practiced by elephant keepers (mahouts) in Tamil Nadu and Puducherry. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study was carried out between June 2015 and February 2016 employing a questionnaire survey among 50 selected informants (mahouts) with traditional knowledge on plants in veterinary medicine. Information was elicited from the informants on various diseases prevailing among captive elephants and the traditional treatment employed by them. RESULTS: In total, the study documented 53 plant species belonging to 29 families being used as medicine for 23 types of ailments prevailing among captive elephants. Ferula assa-foetida, Zingiber officinale, Piper longum, P. nigrum, Cuminum cyminum, Trachyspermum roxburghianum and Carum bulbocastanum were the most commonly used plants either independently or in combination. Among them, Ferula assa-foetida (12.4%) and Zingiber officinale (10.4%) had the highest usage. Of the 23 diseases reported, constipation was the most common ailment (14.6%) followed by bloating (8.7%) and flatulence (8.7%). CONCLUSION: Documentation of this indigenous knowledge is valuable for the communities concerned, both at present and in future and for scientific consideration for wider use of traditional knowledge in treating captive elephants. The study has identified 53 medicinal plants to treat various ailments among captive elephants in southern India. The most frequently used plants in the captive elephant health care practice are F. assafoetida, Z. officinale, P. longum and P.nigrum. Among the 29 families, Apiaceae and Piperaceae are widely used. The leaves are the most useful part of the plants, while paste is the widely used form of preparation. The present findings show that mahouts have wide knowledge about elephant diseases and their treatment using herbal medicine. A more detailed investigation should be designed on priority to document the dying art of ethno-veterinary practices for the long-term conservation of the Asian elephant.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Elephants
Ethnobotany/methods
Herbal Medicine/methods
Plant Preparations/therapeutic use
Veterinary Drugs/therapeutic use
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Gastrointestinal Diseases/drug therapy
Gastrointestinal Diseases/pathology
India
Phytotherapy/methods
Plant Preparations/isolation & purification
Veterinary Drugs/isolation & purification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Preparations); 0 (Veterinary Drugs)
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170719
[Lr] Last revision date:170719
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170302
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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SciELO Brazil full text

[PMID]: 28699966
[Au] Autor:Cotinguiba F; López SN; Budzinski IGF; Labate CA; Kato MJ; Furlan M
[Ad] Address:Programa de Pós-graduação em Química de Produtos Naturais, Instituto de Pesquisas de Produtos Naturais - IPPN, Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro - UFRJ, Av. Carlos Chagas Filho, 373, Bloco H, Ilha do Fundão, CEP 21941-902, Rio de Janeiro, RJ, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Proteomic profile of Piper tuberculatum (Piperaceae).
[So] Source:Braz J Biol;:0, 2017 Jul 10.
[Is] ISSN:1678-4375
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Piper tuberculatum (Piperaceae) is a species that accumulates especially amides as secondary metabolites and several biological activities was previously reported. In this article, we report a proteomic study of P. tuberculatum. Bidimensional electrophoresis (2D SDS-PAGE) and mass spectrometry (ESI-Q-TOF) were used in this study. Over a hundred spots and various peptides were identified in this species and the putative functions of these peptides related to defense mechanism as biotic and abiotic stress were assigned. The information presented extend the range of molecular information of P. tuberculatum.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170712
[Lr] Last revision date:170712
[St] Status:Publisher


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