Database : MEDLINE
Search on : pityriasis and rosea [Words]
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[PMID]: 29520857
[Au] Autor:Alame MM; Chamsy DJ; Zaraket H
[Ad] Address:School of Pharmacy, Lebanese International University, Beirut, Lebanon.
[Ti] Title:Pityriasis rosea-like eruption associated with ondansetron use in pregnancy.
[So] Source:Br J Clin Pharmacol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2125
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 30-year-old pregnant female presented with a 2-week history of pityriasis rosea-like eruption. The rash started 2 days after the patient had started taking ondansetron 8 mg for alleviation of moderate-to-severe nausea and vomiting of pregnancy. Physical examination revealed erythematous papulosquamous lesions characterized by annular scaly margins and a dusky centre over the arms, chest, abdomen, lower back and legs. The rash did not involve the palms, sole or mucous membranes, and no lesions were observed on the lymph nodes. Ondansetron was discontinued. The rash ceased to spread and started to disappear within 2 weeks with full resolution noted after 1 month. Analysis of the case using the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated that ondansetron was the probable cause of the pityriasis rosea-like eruption. This is the first case report of pityriasis rosea related to ondansetron therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/bcp.13560

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[PMID]: 29469755
[Au] Autor:Ciccarese G; Drago F
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, IRCCS AOU San Martino, Genoa, Italy. giuliaciccarese@libero.it.
[Ti] Title:Atypical presentations of pityriasis rosea: a reply.
[So] Source:Dermatol Online J;23(8), 2017 Aug 15.
[Is] ISSN:1087-2108
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pityriasis rosea (PR) may have atypical presentations as regards morphology and distribution of the lesions. Recently, several forms of PR considered atypical for the course of the disease have been described. Differently from the typical PR that resolves within 2-12 weeks, relapsing and persistent PR forms (lasting longer than 12 weeks) have been described in adults and children. Lesions of the oral mucosa in PR may be more common than as reported in the literature. Formerly, the occurrence of oral lesions in PR has been considered more frequent in dark-skinned patients compared to light-skinned patients. However, in 12 Caucasian adult patients with persistent PR that have been recently described, oral lesions were very common (75% of cases). Another study on the clinical features and virological parameters of 31 Caucasian children with PR showed that painless oropharyngeal lesions were present in 35% of them, a rate much higher than those reported in adult dark-skinned (9%) and Caucasian patients (16%) with typical PR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:In-Process

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[PMID]: 29436009
[Au] Autor:Alzahrani NA; AlJasser MI
[Ad] Address:Division of Dermatology, College of Medicine, King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.
[Ti] Title:Geographic tonguelike presentation in a child with pityriasis rosea: Case report and review of oral manifestations of pityriasis rosea.
[So] Source:Pediatr Dermatol;, 2018 Feb 13.
[Is] ISSN:1525-1470
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Oral lesions are rarely reported in patients with pityriasis rosea. We report a case of a 3-year-old boy with clinical evidence of generalized pityriasis rosea who developed asymptomatic oral lesions similar in appearance to geographic tongue. The generalized eruption and tongue lesions resolved simultaneously within 4 weeks. We also review the literature on the oral manifestations of Pityriasis rosea.
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/pde.13417

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[PMID]: 29431416
[Ti] Title:Pityriasis Rosea.
[So] Source:Am Fam Physician;97(1):Online, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1532-0650
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:PATIENT EDUCATION HANDOUT
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 29377079
[Au] Autor:Wessman LL; Andersen LK; Davis MDP
[Ad] Address:University of North Dakota School of Medicine, Grand Forks, ND, USA.
[Ti] Title:Incidence of diseases primarily affecting the skin by age group: population-based epidemiologic study in Olmsted County, Minnesota, and comparison with age-specific incidence rates worldwide.
[So] Source:Int J Dermatol;, 2018 Jan 29.
[Is] ISSN:1365-4632
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Understanding the effects of age on the epidemiology of diseases primarily affecting the skin is important to the practice of dermatology, both for proper allocation of resources and for optimal patient-centered care. To fully appreciate the effect that age may have on the population-based calculations of incidence of diseases primarily affecting the skin in Olmsted County, Minnesota, and worldwide, we performed a review of all relevant Rochester Epidemiology Project-published data and compared them to similar reports in the worldwide English literature. Using the Rochester Epidemiology Project, population-based epidemiologic studies have been performed to estimate the incidence of specific skin diseases over the past 50 years. In older persons (>65 years), nonmelanoma skin cancer, lentigo maligna, herpes zoster, delusional infestation, venous stasis syndrome, venous ulcer, and burning mouth syndrome were more commonly diagnosed. In those younger than 65 years, atypical nevi, psoriatic arthritis, pityriasis rosea, herpes progenitalis, genital warts, alopecia areata, hidradenitis suppurativa, infantile hemangioma, Behçet's disease, and sarcoidosis (isolated cutaneous, with sarcoidosis-specific cutaneous lesions and with erythema nodosum) had a higher incidence. Many of the incidence rates by age group of diseases primarily affecting the skin derived from the Rochester Epidemiology Project were similar to those reported elsewhere.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/ijd.13904

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[PMID]: 29363373
[Au] Autor:Sonthalia S; Kumar A; Zawar V; Priya A; Yadav P; Srivastava S; Gupta A
[Ad] Address:a Department of Dermatology & Dermatosurgery , Skinnocence: The Skin Clinic & Research Center , Gurugram , India.
[Ti] Title:Double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of short-course low-dose oral prednisolone in pityriasis rosea.
[So] Source:J Dermatolog Treat;:1-6, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1471-1753
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of short-course low-dose oral prednisolone in symptomatic pityriasis rosea (PR) of onset <5 days and compare it with placebo. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Placebo-controlled randomized double-blind study design with the treatment group receiving tapering doses of oral prednisolone over 2 weeks and the control group receiving a placebo. Outcome measures evaluated were subsidence of patient-perceived pruritus, improvement in rash quantified by a specific score, adverse effects and relapse at 12 weeks. RESULTS: The improvement in the pruritus score as well as objective rash score were much better in the prednisolone-treated group. No adverse effects reported in either group. The relapse rate at 12 weeks was much higher in the prednisolone treated group. CONCLUSIONS: Oral corticosteroids, even if used in low-dose and for a short tapering course should not be the first line of therapy for PR. The only justified indication may be extensive and highly symptomatic lesions of PR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180201
[Lr] Last revision date:180201
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/09546634.2018.1430302

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[PMID]: 29276879
[Au] Autor:Ogrum A
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology and Venereology, Gaziosmanpasa University Faculty of Medicine, Tokat, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Unilateral pityriasis rosea in a child: A rare clinical presentation.
[So] Source:Turk J Pediatr;59(2):214-216, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0041-4301
[Cp] Country of publication:Turkey
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ogrum A. Unilateral pityriasis rosea in a child: A rare clinical presentation. Turk J Pediatr 2017; 59: 214-216. Pityriasis rosea is a common papulosquamous disorder with occasional variations in lesion morphology, distribution, number and course of disease. The lesions are classically arranged with their long axes parallel to the Langer`s lines of cleavage and typically affect the trunk and the proximal extremities. Variations in the distribution of pityriasis rosea include inversus, localized, and unilateral forms. The unilateral form is a very rare variant of pityriasis rosea, particularly in children. We report a 15-year-old boy with pityriasis rosea demonstrating unilateral localization.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171225
[Lr] Last revision date:171225
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 552 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29263533
[Au] Autor:De A; Roy S; Sukla S; Ansari A; Biswas S
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Calcutta National Medical College and Hospital, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.
[Ti] Title:Occult Hepatitis B Virus Infections (Often with Human Herpesvirus 7 Co-Infection) Detected in Patients: A Pilot Study.
[So] Source:Indian J Dermatol;62(6):598-605, 2017 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1998-3611
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: The etiopathogenesis of (PR), a papulo-squamous skin disease, remains elusive and hypothesized to be caused primarily by human herpesvirus (HHV) 6 or 7 or immune dysfunction. Aims: The recent increasing incidences of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infections, including asymptomatic occult HBV infections (OBIs), in a densely populated city in India, prompted us to investigate whether PR patients (from varied socioeconomic and immune status) harbor the underlying HBV infections. These cases were also investigated for HHV 6 and 7 infections. Materials and Methods: DNA from ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid blood samples from PR-diagnosed individuals ( = 13; mostly young adults) and healthy controls ( = 11) were subjected to virus gene-specific polymerase chain reactions (PCRs) for HBV and HHV 6 and 7. PCR products of expected length, when observed, were sequenced (bidirectional) using overlapping primers. Sequences were identified by NCBI BLAST and analyzed by multiple sequence alignment and phylogenetic studies. The blood samples were tested for HBsAg by EIA. Results: In 5/13 PR samples, only HBV DNA (4/5 being HBsAg negative) was detected, providing first-time evidence that PR may be manifested in asymptomatic HBV carriers. 6/13 cases were HHV 7 (not HHV 6) DNA positive, providing confirmatory molecular genetic evidence for the first time of PR association with HHV 7 from India. Surprisingly, 5/6 HHV 7-positive PR cases were also HBV positive. Overall, 10/13 PR samples showed evidence of HBV infection. 8/13 were OBI, harboring at least one OBI-signature S protein mutation. All healthy controls were HBsAg EIA and PCR negative. Conclusions: 77% of PR patients presented the evidence of underlying HBV infection (genotype D2), suggestive of horizontal HBV transmission. This warrants for mass HBV vaccination. PR patients should be tested for underlying virus infections for appropriate therapy and management.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171224
[Lr] Last revision date:171224
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/ijd.IJD_235_17

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[PMID]: 29182459
[Au] Autor:Li A; Li P; Li Y; Li W
[Ad] Address:a Department of Dermatology , Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University , Jinan , Shandong , People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Title:Recurrent pityriasis rosea: A case report.
[So] Source:Hum Vaccin Immunother;:1-3, 2017 Nov 28.
[Is] ISSN:2164-554X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pityriasis rosea is a papulosquamous skin disorder that occurs most commonly between the ages of 10 and 35 years. Recurrent pityriasis rosea is rare. We report a patient suffering from recurrent pityriasis rosea, whose etiology may be related to either vaccine-induced stimulation of the immune system, or some rare vaccine component(influenza A [H1N1] vaccine, hepatitis B vaccine). We believe that such a case is unique and it has not been reported previously. The patient was successfully treated with a combination of oral cetirizine, a topical steroid cream, and narrowband-ultraviolet B phototherapy. The symptoms of this disorder should be recognized by dermatologists.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171221
[Lr] Last revision date:171221
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1080/21645515.2017.1409928

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[PMID]: 29222811
[Au] Autor:Fu LY; Xu CC; Zheng XD; Chen G; Zhu J; Wang PG
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, No.1 affiliated hospital and Key Laboratory of Dermatology, Ministry of Education, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, China.
[Ti] Title:Association of HLA-DQB1*03:03 with pityriasis rosea in Chinese patients.
[So] Source:Clin Exp Dermatol;, 2017 Dec 08.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2230
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The association of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) with a variety of diseases has been described, especially with various autoimmune diseases. However, there are few studies on the association between HLA and pityriasis rosea (PR). AIM: To investigate the relevance of HLA II alleles with the development of PR. METHODS: Typing for HLA-DRB1, HLA-DQA1 and HLA-DQB1 typing was performed in 55 patients with PR and 90 healthy controls (HCs), using sequence-based typing (SBT) and PCR with sequence-specific primers (PCR-SSP), respectively. RESULTS: We found that the frequency of HLA-DQB1*03:03 was significantly higher in the PR compared with the HC group [P = 0.001; relative risk (RR) = 2.24; 95% CI 1.38-3.6], while suggestive evidence for a protective effect of HLA-DQB1*06:06 was observed in the study cohort (P < 0.02; RR = 0.40; 95% CI 0.17-0.90). CONCLUSIONS: The HLA-DQB1*03:03 allele may be a susceptible factor in patients with PR. In addition, the association of HLA-DQB1*03:03 with PR suggests participation of immunity in the pathogenesis of PR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171209
[Lr] Last revision date:171209
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/ced.13313


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