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[PMID]: 29524085
[Au] Autor:Han XJ; Su DH; Yi JY; Zou YW; Shi YL
[Ad] Address:Graduate School, Southern Medical University, Guangzhou, 510515, China. hanxiujing@sina.com.
[Ti] Title:A Literature Review of Blood-Disseminated P. marneffei Infection and a Case Study of this Infection in an HIV-Negative Child with Comorbid Eosinophilia.
[So] Source:Mycopathologia;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1573-0832
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The typical manifestations of Penicillium marneffei (nowadays Talaromyces marneffei) infection in children without human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) remain unclear. The current work presents the case of a child without an underlying disease who was infected with P. marneffei comorbid with eosinophilia. CASE PRESENTATION: A 2-year-old male was infected with P. marneffei. A physical examination revealed a high-grade fever, ulcerated lesions in the oral mucosa, anemia, pruritic erythematous papules on the sac and thigh and watery diarrhea. A chest enhanced computed tomography scan showed multiple small, nodular, high-density shadows in the lungs, multiple lymphadenectasis in the hilum of the lungs and mediastinum, and liquid in the right pleural cavity. The patient's plasma was negative for HIV. Routine blood tests initially indicated that the patient had leucopenia; however, later tests indicated that he had leukocytosis. This peak was caused by a significant increase in eosinophils. The total IgE and specific allergen levels were normal. The stool was negative for parasite eggs. Aspergillus antigen (galactomannan, GM) levels were significantly increased and were present in the serum for a relatively long period. CONCLUSIONS: Eosinophilia can occur during P. marneffei infection, and this finding might provide additional information on the activity of this intracellular parasite. In addition, GM detection might be useful for monitoring the effect of antifungal treatments; however, this theory requires more data for verification.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11046-018-0255-8

  2 / 6190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29514336
[Au] Autor:Lichtenberger JP; Kim AM; Fisher D; Tatum PS; Neubauer B; Peterson PG; Carter BW
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology and Radiological Sciences, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814.
[Ti] Title:Imaging of Combat-Related Thoracic Trauma - Review of Penetrating Trauma.
[So] Source:Mil Med;183(3-4):e81-e88, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1930-613X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: Combat-related thoracic trauma is a significant contributor to morbidity and mortality of the casualties from Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) and Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Penetrating, blunt, and blast injuries were the most common mechanisms of trauma. Imaging plays a key role in the management of combat-related thoracic trauma casualties. This review discusses the imaging manifestations of thoracic injuries from penetrating trauma, emphasizing epidemiology and diagnostic clues seen during OEF and OIF. Materials and Methods: The assessment of radiologic findings in patients who suffer from combat-related thoracic trauma is the basis of this review article. The imaging modalities for this study include multi-detector computed tomography and chest radiography. Results: High-velocity penetrating projectile injuries appear as hemorrhage and re-expansion pulmonary edema from the temporary cavity and a linear, blood-filled track from the permanent cavity. In cases where the projectile passes totally through the body, entrance wounds at the skin surface and tracks through the subcutaneous tissues may be the only indications of penetrating trauma. When assessing vascular injury, special attention should be paid to the right hilum in contrast-enhanced multi-detector computed tomography, as contrast is concentrated in the superior vena cava and superior cavoatrial junction may obscure small fragments. Additionally, CT angiography may show vessel disruption or extravasation of contrast distal to normal vessel location in addition to intraluminal filling defects and pseudo-aneurysms. Tension pneumopericardium may rarely complicate penetrating or blunt chest trauma. On imaging, distension of the pericardial sack by pneumopericardium and compression of the heart support the diagnosis of tension. On multi-detector computed tomography in the acute trauma setting, fluid in the pleural space should be considered hemothorax, particularly when Hounsfield units are above 35. Acutely, extravasated blood will have similar attenuation to the thoracic vasculature, whereas clotted blood will have higher values of 50-90 Hounsfield units. Conclusion: Combat-related thoracic trauma continues to be a significant contributor to the morbidity and mortality of those injured during OEF and OIF. This review of the imaging manifestations of penetrating thoracic injury during OEF and OIF focuses on key diagnostic findings for clinicians caring for combat casualties. The distinct injury pattern and atypical imaging manifestations of penetrating trauma are important to recognize early due to the acuity of this patient population and the influence of accurate diagnosis on clinical management.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/milmed/usx034

  3 / 6190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29492898
[Au] Autor:Petrella F; Spaggiari L
[Ad] Address:Department of Thoracic Surgery, European Institute of Oncology, Milan, Italy. francesco.petrella@ieo.it.
[Ti] Title:Stem Cells Application in Thoracic Surgery: Current Perspective and Future Directions.
[So] Source:Adv Exp Med Biol;, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:0065-2598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Two main fields of clinical applications of stem cells in thoracic surgery have been explored: (a) regenerative medicine, that is a branch of translational research in tissue engineering and molecular biology dealing with the replacement, engineering or regeneration of cells, tissues and organs to restore normal function; (b) drug loading and delivery, that is an emerging field proposing stem cells as vectors to deliver anti-cancer agents for targeted therapies.Bronchopleural fistula is a pathological connection between the bronchus and the pleural cavity that may develop after lung resection, thus causing pleural empyema due to colonization by resident airway bacteria; stem cells and regenerative medicine approach can effectively contribute to impaired bronchial healing, thus preventive a septic and ventilator catastrophe.In the field of thoracic oncology, MSC are probably one of the best choice for anticancer drug delivery, emerging as potential experimental approach to malignant mesothelioma treatment.The goal of this review is to focus on clinical applications of stem cell technologies in thoracic surgery, emphasizing regenerative medicine aspects as well as drug loading and delivery in thoracic oncology.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/5584_2018_180

  4 / 6190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390299
[Au] Autor:Guo F; Wu J; Peng Y; Tu M; Xiao B; Dai C; Jiang K; Gao W; Li Q; Wei J; Chen J; Xi C; Lu Z; Miao Y
[Ad] Address:Pancreas Center, First Affiliated Hospital.
[Ti] Title:Black pleural effusion due to pancreatic pseudocyst: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e9043, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Black pleural effusion (BPE) is an extremely uncommon type of pleural fluid, which can be due to infection, primary or metastatic malignancy, and hemorrhage. As reported in previous studies, BPE is also observed in some patients with pancreatic pseudocyst. PATIENT CONCERNS: We herein reported a case of a 14-year-old female patient who was admitted to our center with a history of cough for 1 and a half months and right chest pain for 1 month. Before this, she was consecutively hospitalized in 3 different hospitals due to the same symptoms. However, the previous treatments were ineffective due to the lack of a definitive diagnosis. Laboratory examination of the pleural effusion showed BPE with a high amylase concentration. Chest x-ray and computed tomography (CT) showed massive pleural effusion, more prominent in the right chest. CT and MRCP of the abdomen showed a cystic lesion located in the tail of the pancreas, which entered the chest cavity via an esophageal hiatal hernia. DIAGNOSES:: pancreatic pseudocyst. INTERVENTIONS: After confirming that the tumor was a pancreatic pseudocyst by intraoperative biopsy, internal drainage to the jejunum was performed. OUTCOMES: The postoperative recovery was rapid and without complications, and the final discharge diagnosis was idiopathic pancreatic pseudocyst (without history of pancreatitis or pancreatic injuries) with BPE of the right chest. LESSONS: This case demonstrates that massive BPE could present as a rare complication of pancreatic pseudocyst, and surgery is a potential treatment for such patients.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Pancreatic Pseudocyst/complications
Pancreatic Pseudocyst/diagnosis
Pleural Effusion/diagnosis
Pleural Effusion/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Diagnosis, Differential
Diagnostic Imaging
Female
Humans
Pancreatic Pseudocyst/surgery
Pleural Effusion/surgery
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009043

  5 / 6190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390282
[Au] Autor:Nakaya T; Oshiro H; Takigami A; Kanai Y; Tetsuka K; Hagiwara K; Fujii H; Endo S; Tanaka A
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathologyy.
[Ti] Title:Giant solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura with high-grade sarcomatous overgrowth accompanied by lipid-rich, rhabdomyosarcomatous, and pleomorphic components: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);96(50):e8926, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Solitary fibrous tumors are mesenchymal tumors presenting as fibroblastic neoplasms with prominent branching vascular patterns, which are often generated from the pleura. Most solitary fibrous tumors are benign; however, some can turn malignant. High-grade sarcomas from solitary fibrous tumors include multidirectional histopathological components. PATIENT CONCERNS: We describe our experience of a giant high-grade sarcoma with mixed components generated from a solitary fibrous tumor of the pleura in a 67-year-old female patient presenting with cough and left-sided chest pain. The patient had been diagnosed with a pleural mass in the left chest by X-ray about 30 years earlier. However, the tumor was allowed to grow, without surgical intervention, for a long time. INTERVENTIONS: Thoracic surgeons performed the removal of the giant pleural tumor; the tumor measured 18.0 × 14.5 × 10 cm in size, and was considered a giant tumor generated from the pleura of the left chest cavity. DIAGNOSES: The surgically removed tumor was solid and light brownish, and included myxoid and arabesque pattern lesions. The tumor also showed hemorrhagic and necrotic lesions. Moreover, spindle cells with less atypia, resembling fibroblasts, were noted. These spindle tumor cells were CD34- and Stat6-positive, suggesting a solitary fibrous tumor. Some of the spindle tumor cells were surrounded by thick collagenous fibers. Considering that the tumor originated from the parietal pleura, the tumor was defined as a solitary fibrous tumor in origin. The tumor also comprised high-grade sarcomatous components; these included lipid-rich, rhabdomyosarcomatous, and pleomorphic components. The high-grade sarcoma component included bizarre tumor cells with severe atypia. OUTCOMES: Tumor recurrence occurred in the left chest about 4 months after the surgery, and the patient died 8 months postoperatively. LESSONS: The present case clearly demonstrates that a solitary fibrous tumor can develop into high-grade sarcomatous overgrowth, including lipid-rich, rhabdomyosarcoma, and pleomorphic sarcoma components, if left untreated for a prolonged period. This case provides profound insights about the natural history, histogenesis, differentiation, and malignant transformation of solitary fibrous tumors.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Pleural Neoplasms/pathology
Rhabdomyosarcoma/pathology
Sarcoma/pathology
Solitary Fibrous Tumor, Pleural/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Fatal Outcome
Female
Humans
Neoplasm Grading
Neoplasm Recurrence, Local
Pleural Neoplasms/surgery
Rhabdomyosarcoma/surgery
Sarcoma/surgery
Solitary Fibrous Tumor, Pleural/surgery
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180203
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000008926

  6 / 6190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29483464
[Au] Autor:Kuroda Y; Uchida T; Hamasaki A; Yamashita A; Mizumoto M; Hayashi J; Ishizawa A; Akabane K; Sadahiro M
[Ad] Address:Second Department of Surgery, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata, Japan.
[Ti] Title:[Surgical Experience of Distal Aortic Arch Aneurysm Suspected to be Associated with Pre-existing Coarctation of the Aorta].
[So] Source:Kyobu Geka;71(2):111-114, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:0021-5252
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:A 45 year-old-man who had undergone ventricular septal defect repair during childhood presented with hoarseness. He was diagnosed as having a distal aortic arch aneurysm by using computed tomography, and was referred to our hospital for surgical treatment. The operation was performed via a 4th intercostal thoracotomy in the right lateral position. The aortic aneurysm occupied the upper pleural cavity. The aortic arch was pressed up by the aortic aneurysm, so visual identification and clamping of the proximal aorta and the left subclavian artery were extremely difficult. Extracorporeal circulation was established via the right femoral artery and vein. Aneurysmal resection and graft replacement were performed using the open proximal method and retrograde cerebral circulation. The aneurysmal wall and proximal aorta were fragile and the proximal aorta was narrow, although the distal aorta was normal. The difference in diameters between the proximal and distal aorta suggested the presence of coarctation of the aorta.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 6190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29475120
[Au] Autor:Idota N; Nakamura M; Tojo M; Ichioka H; Shintani-Ishida K; Ikegaya H
[Ad] Address:Department of Forensic Medicine, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, 465 Kajii-cho, Kamigyo-ku, Kyoto 602-8566, Japan. Electronic address: idotan@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Infant fatality case with excessive chylous ascites.
[So] Source:Leg Med (Tokyo);32:23-26, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4162
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An 11-month-old boy with marked abdominal distension was found dead in the prone position at home. Since there were many bruises in the non-protruding regions of the head, face, and abdomen, a medicolegal autopsy was performed the following day. The boy was smaller than average (height: 68.5 cm; weight: 7.8 kg); his extremities were thin; and his abdomen was remarkably bulging. Chylous ascites (1600 mL) was observed in the peritoneal cavity and chylous pleural effusion (left: 5 mL; right: 10 mL) in the thoracic cavity. A fibrous induration, approximately 2.0 × 1.5 cm in size, was observed in the root of the small bowel mesentery. Congenital chylothorax and chylous ascites were suspected. However, the remarkably withered thymus and an old injury in the superior labial frenulum suggested that the chylous ascites may have been further deteriorated by injuries sustained during physical abuse. Examination suggested that the death was sudden. Thus, we inferred that the cause of death was circulatory and respiratory failure due to excessive chylous ascites. Among the reported cases of chylous ascites in pediatric patients, some patients experiencing abuse were identified on the basis of their chief complaints of vomiting or abdominal distension. Medical and child welfare staff should be made aware of this information.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 6190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29471912
[Au] Autor:Becker AS; Blüthgen C; Phi van VD; Sekaggya-Wiltshire C; Castelnuovo B; Kambugu A; Fehr J; Frauenfelder T
[Ad] Address:Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University Hospital of Zurich, Zurich, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Detection of tuberculosis patterns in digital photographs of chest X-ray images using Deep Learning: feasibility study.
[So] Source:Int J Tuberc Lung Dis;22(3):328-335, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1815-7920
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the feasibility of Deep Learning-based detection and classification of pathological patterns in a set of digital photographs of chest X-ray (CXR) images of tuberculosis (TB) patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this prospective, observational study, patients with previously diagnosed TB were enrolled. Photographs of their CXRs were taken using a consumer-grade digital still camera. The images were stratified by pathological patterns into classes: cavity, consolidation, effusion, interstitial changes, miliary pattern or normal examination. Image analysis was performed with commercially available Deep Learning software in two steps. Pathological areas were first localised; detected areas were then classified. Detection was assessed using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis, and classification using a confusion matrix. RESULTS: The study cohort was 138 patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and TB co-infection (median age 34 years, IQR 28-40); 54 patients were female. Localisation of pathological areas was excellent (area under the ROC curve 0.82). The software could perfectly distinguish pleural effusions from intraparenchymal changes. The most frequent misclassifications were consolidations as cavitations, and miliary patterns as interstitial patterns (and vice versa). CONCLUSION: Deep Learning analysis of CXR photographs is a promising tool. Further efforts are needed to build larger, high-quality data sets to achieve better diagnostic performance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.5588/ijtld.17.0520

  9 / 6190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29301855
[Au] Autor:Bai Y; Liu Y; Su Z; Ma Y; Ren C; Zhao R; Ji HL
[Ad] Address:Institute of Lung and Molecular Therapy, Xinxiang Medical University, Xinxiang, China.
[Ti] Title:Gene editing as a promising approach for respiratory diseases.
[So] Source:J Med Genet;55(3):143-149, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1468-6244
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Respiratory diseases, which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in the world, are dysfunctions of the nasopharynx, the trachea, the bronchus, the lung and the pleural cavity. Symptoms of chronic respiratory diseases, such as cough, sneezing and difficulty breathing, may seriously affect the productivity, sleep quality and physical and mental well-being of patients, and patients with acute respiratory diseases may have difficulty breathing, anoxia and even life-threatening respiratory failure. Respiratory diseases are generally heterogeneous, with multifaceted causes including smoking, ageing, air pollution, infection and gene mutations. Clinically, a single pulmonary disease can exhibit more than one phenotype or coexist with multiple organ disorders. To correct abnormal function or repair injured respiratory tissues, one of the most promising techniques is to correct mutated genes by gene editing, as some gene mutations have been clearly demonstrated to be associated with genetic or heterogeneous respiratory diseases. Zinc finger nucleases (ZFN), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) and clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) systems are three innovative gene editing technologies developed recently. In this short review, we have summarised the structure and operating principles of the ZFNs, TALENs and CRISPR/Cas9 systems and their preclinical and clinical applications in respiratory diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1136/jmedgenet-2017-104960

  10 / 6190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29443793
[Au] Autor:Huang J; Yu Y; Lin W; Zhang D; Deng Z; Ding Q
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacy, The Affiliated Hospital of Medical School of Ningbo University.
[Ti] Title:Olanzapine-induced peripheral eosinophilia and eosinophilic pleural effusion: A case report.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(7):e9996, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:RATIONALE: Eosinophilic pleural effusion (EPE) is an eosinophil count ≥10% in pleural effusion, which is a rare condition in drug therapy. PATIENT CONCERNS: We describe the case of a 70-year-old Alzheimer patient who was taking olanzapine for 2 months for the treatment of depression, and developed peripheral eosinophilia and bilateral EPE. DIAGNOSES: Olanzapine-induced peripheral eosinophilia and eosinophilic pleural effusion was diagnosed. INTERVENTIONS: Olanzapine was discontinued, and repeated drainage of fluid from the pleural cavity was performed. OUTCOMES: All symptoms-as well as the EPE-were resolved 6 months later. LESSONS: This case is a reminder that olanzapine may be a potential agent for EPE, and that this should be considered in clinical practice.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antidepressive Agents/adverse effects
Benzodiazepines/adverse effects
Eosinophilia/chemically induced
Pleural Effusion/chemically induced
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Depression/drug therapy
Drainage
Humans
Male
Pleural Effusion/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antidepressive Agents); 12794-10-4 (Benzodiazepines); N7U69T4SZR (olanzapine)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009996


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