Database : MEDLINE
Search on : proteins [Words]
References found : 2682766 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 268277 go to page                         

  1 / 2682766 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524849
[Au] Autor:Di Martino A; Trusova ME; Postnikov PS; Sedlarik V
[Ad] Address:Centre of Polymer Systems, University Institute, Tomas Bata University in Zlin, Tr.Tomas Bati, 5678, 76001, Zlin, Czech Republic; Research School in Chemistry & Applied Biomedical Sciences, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Lenin Av. 30, 634050 Tomsk, Russian Federation. Electronic address: dimartin
[Ti] Title:Branched poly (lactic acid) microparticles for enhancing the 5-aminolevulinic acid phototoxicity.
[So] Source:J Photochem Photobiol B;181:80-88, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2682
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:An innovative microcarrier based on a carboxy-enriched and branched polylactic acid derivative was developed to enhance the in vitro phototoxicity of the photosensitizer and prodrug 5-aminolevulinic. Microparticles, prepared by double emulsion technique and loaded with the prodrug were carefully characterized and the effect of the polymer structure on the chemical, physical and biological properties of the final product was evaluated. Results showed that microparticles have a spherical shape and ability to allocate up to 30 µg of the photosensitizer per mg of carrier despite their difference in solubility. Release studies performed in various simulated physiological conditions demonstrate the influence of the branched structure and the presence of the additional carboxylic groups on the release rate and the possibility to modulate it. In vitro assays conducted on human epithelial adenocarcinoma cells proved the not cytotoxicity of the carriers in a wide range of concentrations. The hemocompatibility and surface proteins adsorption were evaluated at different microparticles concentrations to evaluate the safety and estimate the possible microparticles residential time in the bloodstream. The advantages, of loading 5-aminolevulinic acid in the prepared carrier has been deeply described in terms of enhanced phototoxicity, compared to the free 5-aminolevulinic acid formulation after irradiation with light at 635 nm. The obtained results demonstrate the advantages of the prepared derivative compared to the linear polylactide for future application in photodynamic therapy based on the photosensitizer 5-aminolevulinic acid.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 2682766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524843
[Au] Autor:Sena FV; Sousa FM; Oliveira ASF; Soares CM; Catarino T; Pereira MM
[Ad] Address:Instituto de Tecnologia Química e Biológica - António Xavier, Universidade Nova de Lisboa, Av. da Republica EAN, 2780-157 Oeiras, Portugal.
[Ti] Title:Regulation of the mechanism of Type-II NADH: Quinone oxidoreductase from S. aureus.
[So] Source:Redox Biol;16:209-214, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:2213-2317
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Type-II NADH:quinone oxidoreductases (NDH-2s) are membrane proteins involved in respiratory chains and the only enzymes with NADH:quinone oxidoreductase activity expressed in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), one of the most common causes of clinical infections. NDH-2s are members of the two-Dinucleotide Binding Domains Flavoprotein (tDBDF) superfamily, having a flavin adenine dinucleotide, FAD, as prosthetic group and NAD(P)H as substrate. The establishment of a Charge-Transfer Complex (CTC) between the isoalloxazine ring of the reduced flavin and the nicotinamide ring of NAD+ in NDH-2 was described, and in this work we explored its role in the kinetic mechanism using different electron donors and electron acceptors. We observed that CTC slows down the rate of the second half reaction (quinone reduction) and determines the effect of HQNO, an inhibitor. Also, protonation equilibrium simulations clearly indicate that the protonation probability of an important residue for proton transfer to the active site (D302) is influenced by the presence of the CTC. We propose that CTC is critical for the overall mechanism of NDH-2 and possibly relevant to keep a low quinol/quinone ratio and avoid excessive ROS production in vivo.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 2682766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524839
[Au] Autor:Chirani AS; Majidzadeh R; Pouriran R; Heidary M; Nasiri MJ; Gholami M; Goudarzi M; Omrani VF
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, School of Medicine, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Electronic address: Alireza.salimichirani@sbmu.ac.ir.
[Ti] Title:The effect of in silico targeting Pseudomonas aeruginosa patatin-like protein D, for immunogenic administration.
[So] Source:Comput Biol Chem;74:12-19, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1476-928X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The vaccine candidates that have been introduced for immunization against Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa) strains are quite diverse. In fact, there has been no proper antigen to act as an effective immunogenic substance against this ubiquitous pathogen in the market as yet. The complications caused by this bacterium due to the rapid development of multiple drug resistant strains have led to clinical problems worldwide. P. aeruginosa encodes many specific virulence elements that could be used as appropriate vaccine candidates. Type Vd secretion system, also known as patatin-like protein D, is a novel P. aeruginosa auto-transporter system. It is known that cellular or humoral immune responses could be elevated by chimeric proteins carrying epitopes. It has been recognized that in silico tools are essential for the evaluation of new chimeric antigens. In this study, we have considered the patatin-like protein D (PlpD) molecule from P. aeruginosa and predicted some immunogenic properties of this strong cytotoxic phospholipase A2 with the use of in-depth computational and immunoinformatics assessment methods The novelty of our in silico study is the modeling and assessment of both humoral and cellular immune potential against the PlpD molecule. The molecule was considered by multiple sequence alignment and homology valuation. The extremely conserved regions in the PlpD were predicted. The allergenic and physicochemical property predictions on the PlpD state that the molecule is a non-allergic and stable molecule. High-resolution secondary and tertiary conformations were created. Indeed, the B-cell and T-cell epitope mapping on the chimeric target protein confirmed that the engineered protein contained a tremendous number of both B-cell and T-cell corresponding epitopes. This investigation magnificently attained the chimeric molecule as being a potent lipolytic enzyme composed of numerous B-cell and T-cell restricted epitopes and could induce both humoral and cellular immune responses. The results indicated that this molecule has therapeutic potential against several potent pathogenic P. aeruginosa strains.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 2682766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524815
[Au] Autor:Sharma D; Singh MP; Vimal D; Kumar S; Jha RR; Chowdhuri DK
[Ad] Address:Embryotoxicology Laboratory, Environmental Toxicology Group, CSIR-Indian Institute of Toxicology Research (CSIR-IITR), Vishvigyan Bhavan, 31, Mahatma Gandhi Marg, Lucknow, 226 001 Uttar Pradesh, India; Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research (AcSIR), CSIR-IITR Campus, Lucknow, India.
[Ti] Title:Benzene induced resistance in exposed Drosophila melanogaster: Outcome of improved detoxification and gene modulation.
[So] Source:Chemosphere;201:144-158, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1298
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Adaptive behaviour of an organism has relevance towards developing better resistance in subsequent generations following xenobiotic exposures. Using a genetically tractable and functional insect model, Drosophila melanogaster, we aimed to examine the resistance of the organism against repeated exposures of benzene, an industrial and environmental-chemical and a class I human carcinogen. While 100 mM benzene exposure to one-day old flies for seven days caused ∼95% mortality (F0), its exposure to subsequent generations of flies led a significant decrease in mortality with maximum survival (∼85%) as evident at F28 generation. While burden of benzene and its toxic metabolites was higher in initial generations, in latter generations (F24-F28), concentrations of less toxic metabolites were higher. In parallel, improved metabolism, less oxidative stress, less induction of hsp60 and hsp70 and higher induction of hsp26 and hsp27 along with increased gene dose ratio of three genes (cyp6g1, mrp1, and cyp12d1) were observed in latter generations of benzene exposed flies with maximum benefit accrued in F28 generation. The resistance developed in flies of F28 generation had a negative impact on reproduction which might be due to a cost against selection. The study demonstrates development of benzene resistance in Drosophila with permanent genetic changes.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 2682766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524781
[Au] Autor:Filimonova V; De Troch M; Gonçalves F; Marques JC; Marques SM; Gonçalves AMM; De Laender F
[Ad] Address:IMAR-CMA & MARE, Faculty of Science and Technology, University of Coimbra, 3004-517 Coimbra, Portugal; Department of Biology & CESAM, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal; Faculty of Science, Biology Department, Marine Biology, Ghent University, Krijgslaan 281-S8, B-9000 Gent, Bel
[Ti] Title:Effects of a herbicide and copper mixture on the quality of marine plankton.
[So] Source:Ecotoxicol Environ Saf;156:9-17, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2414
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pesticides and metals are often used in agriculture and are therefore often simultaneously discharged to nearby estuarine and marine areas. The effects of this organic-inorganic chemical mixture on food quality of aquatic organisms are currently unknown. In this study we test if a mixture of copper (inorganic) and the herbicide Primextra® Gold TZ (organic) affects the quality of the diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii and the copepod Acartia tonsa - two key species that fuel the local food-web. We quantified quality (i.e. energy content as food for the next trophic level) in terms of fatty acids, proteins and thiobarbituric acid reacting substances. We found non-additive effects (positive and negative) of the metal-herbicide mixture on the diatom and copepod species. In general, nutritionally important biochemical parameters of Acartia tonsa were most sensitive to the chemical stressors.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 2682766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524730
[Au] Autor:Palacios M; Tampe R; Del Campo M; Zhong TY; López MN; Salazar-Onfray F; Becker MI
[Ad] Address:Fundación Ciencia y Tecnología para el Desarrollo (FUCITED), Avenida Eduardo Castillo Velasco 2902, Santiago 7750269, Chile.
[Ti] Title:Antitumor activity and carrier properties of novel hemocyanins coupled to a mimotope of GD2 ganglioside.
[So] Source:Eur J Med Chem;150:74-86, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1768-3254
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Conjugation to carrier proteins is a way to improve the immunogenicity of peptides. Such is the case for peptides mimicking carbohydrate tumor-associated antigens in cancer vaccine development. The most used protein for this purpose is the keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) from Megathura crenulata. Its limited bioavailability has prompted interest in finding new candidates; nevertheless, it is not known whether other hemocyanins might be equally efficient as carrier of carbohydrate peptide mimotopes to promotes anti-tumor responses. Here, we evaluated the carrier and antitumor activity of novel hemocyanins with documented immunogenicity obtained from Concholepas concholepas (CCH) and Fissurella latimarginata (FLH), coupled through sulfo-SMCC to P10, a mimetic peptide of GD2, the major ganglioside constituent of neuroectodermal tumors, and incorporating AddaVax as an adjuvant. The humoral immune responses of mice showed that CCH-P10 and FLH-P10 conjugates elicited specific IgM and IgG antibodies against P10 mimotope, similar to those obtained with KLH-P10, which was used as a positive control. The CCH-P10 and FLH-P10 antisera, exhibited cross-reactivity with murine and human melanoma cells, like anti-CCH and anti-FLH sera suggesting a cross-reaction of CCH and FLH glycosylations with carbohydrate epitopes on the tumor cell surfaces, similar to the KLH antisera. When mice were primed with each hemocyanin-P10 and challenged with melanoma cells, better antitumor effects were observed for FLH-P10 than for CCH-P10 and, as for KLH-P10, irrespective of conjugation. These data demonstrate that CCH and FLH are useful carriers of carbohydrate mimotopes; however, the best antitumor activity of FLH preparations, indicate that is a suitable candidate for further cancer vaccines research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 2682766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524699
[Au] Autor:Zhou YZ; Li CZ; Gao H; Zhang YZ
[Ad] Address:Beijing Neurosurgical Institute, Beijing Tiantan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing.
[Ti] Title:The effects of Smad3 on ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma development, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and hormone secretion.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Down-regulation of Smad3 results in the formation of tumors both in vivo and in vitro. However, little is known about the effect of Smad3 on adrenocorticotropic hormone -secreting pituitary adenomas (ACTH-PAs). Our objective was to study the expression and effect of Smad3 in ACTH-PAs and its possible mechanisms. METHODS: Smad3, pSmad3, and Smad2 proteins were detected in samples from 5 normal anterior pituitaries and 18 ACTH-PAs by Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis. Then, Smad3 expression was up-regulated by Smad3-CMV plasmid or down-regulated by small interfering RNA (siRNA) in ACTH tumor cells (AtT-20) in vitro. Cell proliferation, apoptosis, ACTH level, and pSmad3, BCL-2 and POMC protein expression in the AtT-20 cells were measured to investigate the anti-tumor effects of Smad3. RESULTS: Reduced expression of Smad3 and pSmad3, but unchanged Smad2 levels, were found in ACTH-PAs compared to normal pituitaries. In vitro, the over-expression of Smad3 inhibited cell proliferation, promoted cell apoptosis, and decreased ACTH secretion; on the other hand, Smad3 knockdown increased cell proliferation and decreased cell apoptosis but had no significant effect on ACTH secretion. At the same time, over-expression of Smad3 increased pSmad3 but inhibited BCL-2 and POMC protein expression. On the contrary, under-expression of Smad3 inhibited pSmad3 but promoted BCL-2 and POMC protein expression. CONCLUSION: Smad3 is under expressed in ACTH-PAs. Reversing the expression of Smad3 in AtT-20 cells could suppress cell growth, promote tumor apoptosis, and decrease ACTH secretion. Tumor suppression was possibly mediated by the promotion of pSmad3 and the reduction of BCL-2 and POMC expression.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 2682766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524694
[Au] Autor:Zhu Y; Li Z; Wang P; Shen L; Zhang D; Yamaguchi Y
[Ad] Address:Engineering Research Center of Optical Instrument and System, Ministry of Education, Shanghai Key Lab of Modern Optical System, University of Shanghai for Science and Technology, No. 516 JunGong Road, Shanghai 200093, China.
[Ti] Title:Factors affecting the separation performance of proteins in capillary electrophoresis.
[So] Source:J Chromatogr B Analyt Technol Biomed Life Sci;1083:63-67, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1873-376X
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Capillary electrophoresis (CE) is an effective tool for protein separation and analysis. Compared with capillary gel electrophoresis (CGE), non-gel sieving capillary electrophoresis (NGSCE) processes the superiority on operation, repeatability and automaticity. Herein, we investigated the effect of polymer molecular weight and concentration, electric field strength, and the effective length of the capillary on the separation performance of proteins, and find that (1) polymer with high molecular weight and concentration favors the separation of proteins, although concentrated polymer hinders its injection into the channel of the capillary due to its high viscosity. (2) The resolution between the adjacent proteins decreases with the increase of electric field strength. (3) When the effective length of the capillary is long, the separation performance improves at the cost of separation time. (4) 1.4% (w/v) hydroxyethyl cellulose (HEC), 100 V/cm voltage and 12 cm effective length offers the best separation for the proteins with molecular weight from 14,400 Da to 97,400 Da. Finally, we employed the optimal electrophoretic conditions to resolve Lysozyme, Ovalbumin, BSA and their mixtures, and found that they were baseline resolved within 15 min.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 2682766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524682
[Au] Autor:Ghosh K; N I
[Ad] Address:Unit of Toxicology, Department of Zoology, School of Life Sciences, Bharathiar University, Coimbatore, 641046, Tamil Nadu, India; Department of Zoology, Annamalai University, Annamalainagar, Chidambaram, 608002, Tamil Nadu, India. Electronic address: kavisa9@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Cadmium treatment induces echinocytosis, DNA damage, inflammation, and apoptosis in cardiac tissue of albino Wistar rats.
[So] Source:Environ Toxicol Pharmacol;59:43-52, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7077
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Cadmium (Cd), a potent carcinogen present in almost all foods, poses a major health risk to humans. Major routes of exposure to Cd for humans are occupation, diet, and tobacco use. Cd elicits various deleterious effects on cellular molecules mainly by causing oxidant-antioxidant imbalance. Cd has been implicated in the pathogenesis of many cancers, Itai-itai disease, diabetic nephropathy, hypertension, peripheral artery disease, and myocardial infarction. This study was designed to investigate the effects of Cd intake on erythrocytes and cardiac tissue in male albino Wistar rats. We treated male albino Wistar rats with cadmium chloride (CdCl ) by intra-gastric administration for 30 days and examined Cd burden and changes in blood constituents and antioxidant status of blood and cardiac tissue. We also studied the structural alterations in the erthrocytes, elemental changes and Cd burden in cardiac tissue using scanning electron microscope (SEM/EDX). Inflammation and apoptosis were analysed in the cardiac tissue by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), western blotting, and DNA fragmentation assay. Cd treatment resulted in echinocytosis of erythrocytes and distorted myofibrils arrangement, vacuolization and congestion in the vessels. Cd administration has also induced inflammation and apoptosis in the cardiac tissue. At molecular level, Cd administration caused oxidative damage to DNA, lipids, and proteins and diminished the activities of various antioxidants. The present study provides a compelling evidence of Cd-induced imbalance in oxidant-antioxidant system with damage to erythrocytes and cardiac tissue that may contribute to various cardiac diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 2682766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524674
[Au] Autor:Müller J; Prozeller D; Ghazaryan A; Kokkinopoulou M; Mailänder V; Morsbach S; Landfester K
[Ad] Address:Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz, Germany; Dermatology Clinic, University Medical Center Mainz, Langenbeckstraße 1, 55131 Mainz, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Beyond the Protein Corona - Lipids Matter for Biological Response of Nanocarriers.
[So] Source:Acta Biomater;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1878-7568
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The interaction of nanocarriers with blood plasma components influences the biological response, and therefore, it needs to be controlled. Whereas protein adsorption to nanocarriers has been investigated to a large extent, the role of lipid interaction for drug delivery and its biological effect is not yet clear. However, lipids represent an important constituent of blood plasma and are usually bound in the form of lipoproteins. Because already for many nanocarrier systems an enrichment of apolipoproteins in their protein corona was reported, we examine the interaction of lipoproteins with nanocarriers. If interaction occurs in terms of lipoprotein adsorption, two scenarios are possible: adsorption of intact lipoprotein complexes or disintegration of the complexes with adsorption of the single components. To investigate the interaction and clarify which scenario occurs, polymeric model nanoparticles and different lipoprotein types have been studied by isothermal titration calorimetry, transmission electron microscopy, and other methods. Our data indicate that upon contact with polymeric nanoparticles, disintegration of lipoproteins and adsorption of lipids occurs. Further, the effect of lipoprotein adsorption on cell uptake has been examined, and a major effect of the lipoproteins has been found. STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE: It is now well accepted that nanomaterials developed as diagnostic or therapeutic carrier systems need to be well characterized in terms of biological responses inside an organism. Many studies have already shown that proteins adsorb to the surface of a nanomaterial and create a new interface that define the identity of the material. However, the presence of other surface-active components of the blood plasma and how they interact with nanomaterials has been much less investigated. Thus, this study aims at providing a significant contribution to understanding the interaction mechanism between lipoproteins and nanomaterials. Since lipoproteins transport a high amount of lipids, which are surface-active molecules, the demonstrated interactions can go as far as complete lipoprotein disintegration.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher


page 1 of 268277 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information