Database : MEDLINE
Search on : putamen [Words]
References found : 15033 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 1504 go to page                         

  1 / 15033 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29515968
[Au] Autor:Isobe M; Redden SA; Keuthen NJ; Stein DJ; Lochner C; Grant JE; Chamberlain SR
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, UK.
[Ti] Title:Striatal abnormalities in trichotillomania: a multi-site MRI analysis.
[So] Source:Neuroimage Clin;17:893-898, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:2213-1582
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Trichotillomania (hair-pulling disorder) is characterized by the repetitive pulling out of one's own hair, and is classified as an Obsessive-Compulsive Related Disorder. Abnormalities of the ventral and dorsal striatum have been implicated in disease models of trichotillomania, based on translational research, but direct evidence is lacking. The aim of this study was to elucidate subcortical morphometric abnormalities, including localized curvature changes, in trichotillomania. De-identified MRI scans were pooled by contacting authors of previous peer-reviewed studies that examined brain structure in adult patients with trichotillomania, following an extensive literature search. Group differences on subcortical volumes of interest were explored (t-tests) and localized differences in subcortical structure morphology were quantified using permutation testing. The pooled sample comprised N=68 individuals with trichotillomania and N=41 healthy controls. Groups were well-matched in terms of age, gender, and educational levels. Significant volumetric reductions were found in trichotillomania patients versus controls in right amygdala and left putamen. Localized shape deformities were found in bilateral nucleus accumbens, bilateral amygdala, right caudate and right putamen. Structural abnormalities of subcortical regions involved in affect regulation, inhibitory control, and habit generation, play a key role in the pathophysiology of trichotillomania. Trichotillomania may constitute a useful model through which to better understand other compulsive symptoms. These findings may account for why certain medications appear effective for trichotillomania, namely those modulating subcortical dopamine and glutamatergic function. Future work should study the state versus trait nature of these changes, and the impact of treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.nicl.2017.12.031

  2 / 15033 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29499311
[Au] Autor:Moraes MM; Rabelo PCR; Pinto VA; Pires W; Wanner SP; Szawka RE; Soares DD
[Ad] Address:Exercise Physiology Laboratory, Department of Physical Education, School of Physical Education, Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy, Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Electronic address: michelemmoraes@ufmg.br.
[Ti] Title:Auditory stimulation by exposure to melodic music increases dopamine and serotonin activities in rat forebrain areas linked to reward and motor control.
[So] Source:Neurosci Lett;673:73-78, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7972
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Listening to melodic music is regarded as a non-pharmacological intervention that ameliorates various disease symptoms, likely by changing the activity of brain monoaminergic systems. Here, we investigated the effects of exposure to melodic music on the concentrations of dopamine (DA), serotonin (5-HT) and their respective metabolites in the caudate-putamen (CPu) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc), areas linked to reward and motor control. Male adult Wistar rats were randomly assigned to a control group or a group exposed to music. The music group was submitted to 8 music sessions [Mozart's sonata for two pianos (K. 488) at an average sound pressure of 65 dB]. The control rats were handled in the same way but were not exposed to music. Immediately after the last exposure or control session, the rats were euthanized, and their brains were quickly removed to analyze the concentrations of 5-HT, DA, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in the CPu and NAcc. Auditory stimuli affected the monoaminergic system in these two brain structures. In the CPu, auditory stimuli increased the concentrations of DA and 5-HIAA but did not change the DOPAC or 5-HT levels. In the NAcc, music markedly increased the DOPAC/DA ratio, suggesting an increase in DA turnover. Our data indicate that auditory stimuli, such as exposure to melodic music, increase DA levels and the release of 5-HT in the CPu as well as DA turnover in the NAcc, suggesting that the music had a direct impact on monoamine activity in these brain areas.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 15033 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29496609
[Au] Autor:Kerepesi C; Varga B; Szalkai B; Grolmusz V
[Ad] Address:PIT Bioinformatics Group, Eötvös University, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary; Institute for Computer Science and Control (MTA SZTAKI), Hungarian Academy of Sciences. Electronic address: kerepesi@pitgroup.org.
[Ti] Title:The dorsal striatum and the dynamics of the consensus connectomes in the frontal lobe of the human brain.
[So] Source:Neurosci Lett;673:51-55, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7972
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In the applications of the graph theory, it is unusual that one considers numerous, pairwise different graphs on the very same set of vertices. In the case of human braingraphs or connectomes, however, this is the standard situation: the nodes correspond to anatomically identified cerebral regions, and two vertices are connected by an edge if a diffusion MRI-based workflow identifies a fiber of axons, running between the two regions, corresponding to the two vertices. Therefore, if we examine the braingraphs of n subjects, then we have n graphs on the very same, anatomically identified vertex set. It is a natural idea to describe the k-frequently appearing edges in these graphs: the edges that are present between the same two vertices in at least k out of the n graphs. Based on the NIH-funded large Human Connectome Project's public data release, we have reported the construction of the Budapest Reference Connectome Server http://www.connectome.pitgroup.org that generates and visualizes these k-frequently appearing edges. We call the graphs of the k-frequently appearing edges "k-consensus connectomes" since an edge could be included only if it is present in at least k graphs out of n. Considering the whole human brain, we have reported a surprising property of these consensus connectomes earlier. In the present work we are focusing on the frontal lobe of the brain, and we report here a similarly surprising dynamical property of the consensus connectomes when k is gradually changed from k = n to k = 1: the connections between the nodes of the frontal lobe are seemingly emanating from those nodes that were connected to sub-cortical structures of the dorsal striatum: the caudate nucleus, and the putamen. We hypothesize that this dynamic behavior copies the axonal fiber development of the frontal lobe. An animation of the phenomenon is presented at https://youtu.be/wBciB2eW6_8.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 15033 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29482716
[Au] Autor:Zhang S; Mano H; Lee M; Yoshida W; Kawato M; Robbins TW; Seymour B
[Ad] Address:Computational and Biological Learning Laboratory, Department of Engineering, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:The control of tonic pain by active relief learning.
[So] Source:Elife;7, 2018 Feb 27.
[Is] ISSN:2050-084X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tonic pain after injury characterises a behavioural state that prioritises recovery. Although generally suppressing cognition and attention, tonic pain needs to allow effective relief learning to reduce the cause of the pain. Here, we describe a central learning circuit that supports learning of relief and concurrently suppresses the level of ongoing pain. We used computational modelling of behavioural, physiological and neuroimaging data in two experiments in which subjects learned to terminate tonic pain in static and dynamic escape-learning paradigms. In both studies, we show that active relief-seeking involves a reinforcement learning process manifest by error signals observed in the dorsal putamen. Critically, this system uses an uncertainty ('associability') signal detected in pregenual anterior cingulate cortex that both controls the relief learning rate, and endogenously and parametrically modulates the level of tonic pain. The results define a self-organising learning circuit that reduces ongoing pain when learning about potential relief.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 15033 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29428325
[Au] Autor:Forster SE; Dickey MW; Forman SD
[Ad] Address:VA Pittsburgh Healthcare System, United States; University of Pittsburgh, Department of Psychiatry, United States. Electronic address: sarah.forster2@va.gov.
[Ti] Title:Regional cerebral blood flow predictors of relapse and resilience in substance use recovery: A coordinate-based meta-analysis of human neuroimaging studies.
[So] Source:Drug Alcohol Depend;185:93-105, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0046
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Predicting relapse vulnerability can inform level-of-care and personalized substance use treatment. Few reliable predictors of relapse risk have been identified from traditional clinical, psychosocial, and demographic variables. However, recent neuroimaging findings highlight the potential prognostic import of brain-based signals, indexing the degree to which neural systems have been perturbed by addiction. These proposed "neuromarkers" forecast the likelihood, severity, and timing of relapse but the reliability and generalizability of such effects remains to be established. METHODS: Activation likelihood estimation was used to conduct a preliminary quantitative, coordinate-based meta-analysis of the addiction neuroprediction literature; specifically, studies wherein baseline measures of regional cerebral blood flow were prospectively associated with substance use treatment outcomes. Consensus patterns of activation associated with relapse vulnerability (greater activation predicts poorer outcomes) versus resilience (greater activation predicts improved outcomes) were specifically investigated. RESULTS: Twenty-four eligible studies yielded 134 foci, representing 923 subjects. Consensus activation was identified in right putamen and claustrum (p < .05, cluster-corrected) in relation to positive and negative treatment outcomes - likely reflecting variability in measurement context (e.g., task, sample characteristics) across datasets. A single cluster in rostral-ventral anterior cingulate cortex (rACC) was associated with relapse resilience, specifically (p < .05, cluster-corrected); no significant vulnerability-related clusters were identified. CONCLUSIONS: Right putamen activation has been associated with relapse vulnerability and resilience, while increased baseline rACC activation has been consistently associated with improved treatment outcomes. Methodological heterogeneity within the existing literature, however, limits firm conclusions and future work will be necessary to confirm and clarify these results.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 15033 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29186356
[Au] Autor:De Simoni S; Jenkins PO; Bourke NJ; Fleminger JJ; Hellyer PJ; Jolly AE; Patel MC; Cole JH; Leech R; Sharp DJ
[Ad] Address:Computational, Cognitive and Clinical Neuroimaging Laboratory, Imperial College London, Division of Brain Sciences, Hammersmith Hospital, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Altered caudate connectivity is associated with executive dysfunction after traumatic brain injury.
[So] Source:Brain;141(1):148-164, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2156
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Traumatic brain injury often produces executive dysfunction. This characteristic cognitive impairment often causes long-term problems with behaviour and personality. Frontal lobe injuries are associated with executive dysfunction, but it is unclear how these injuries relate to corticostriatal interactions that are known to play an important role in behavioural control. We hypothesized that executive dysfunction after traumatic brain injury would be associated with abnormal corticostriatal interactions, a question that has not previously been investigated. We used structural and functional MRI measures of connectivity to investigate this. Corticostriatal functional connectivity in healthy individuals was initially defined using a data-driven approach. A constrained independent component analysis approach was applied in 100 healthy adult dataset from the Human Connectome Project. Diffusion tractography was also performed to generate white matter tracts. The output of this analysis was used to compare corticostriatal functional connectivity and structural integrity between groups of 42 patients with traumatic brain injury and 21 age-matched controls. Subdivisions of the caudate and putamen had distinct patterns of functional connectivity. Traumatic brain injury patients showed disruption to functional connectivity between the caudate and a distributed set of cortical regions, including the anterior cingulate cortex. Cognitive impairments in the patients were mainly seen in processing speed and executive function, as well as increased levels of apathy and fatigue. Abnormalities of caudate functional connectivity correlated with these cognitive impairments, with reductions in right caudate connectivity associated with increased executive dysfunction, information processing speed and memory impairment. Structural connectivity, measured using diffusion tensor imaging between the caudate and anterior cingulate cortex was impaired and this also correlated with measures of executive dysfunction. We show for the first time that altered subcortical connectivity is associated with large-scale network disruption in traumatic brain injury and that this disruption is related to the cognitive impairments seen in these patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/brain/awx309

  7 / 15033 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29523394
[Au] Autor:Kim R; Lee J; Kim Y; Kim A; Jang M; Kim HJ; Jeon B; Kang UJ; Fahn S
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Seoul National University Hospital, College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea; Department of Neurology, Aerospace Medical Center, Republic of Korea Air Force, Cheongju, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Presynaptic striatal dopaminergic depletion predicts the later development of freezing of gait in de novo Parkinson's disease: An analysis of the PPMI cohort.
[So] Source:Parkinsonism Relat Disord;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5126
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: The current study was designed to determine whether the degree of presynaptic striatal dopamine depletion can predict the later development of freezing of gait (FOG) in Parkinson's disease (PD). METHODS: This retrospective cohort study included 390 de novo patients with PD without FOG at baseline. The participants were divided into tertiles according to the baseline dopamine transporter (DAT) uptake of each striatal subregion, and the cumulative risk of FOG was compared using the Kaplan-Meier method. Cox proportional hazard models were used to assess the predictive power of DAT uptake of striatal subregions for the development of FOG. RESULTS: During a median follow-up period of 4.0 years, 143 patients with PD (36.7%) developed FOG. The severe reduction group of DAT uptake in the caudate nucleus and putamen had a significantly higher incidence of FOG than that of the mild and moderate reduction groups. Multivariate Cox regression analyses showed that DAT uptakes in the caudate nucleus (hazard ratio [HR] 0.551; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.392-0.773; p = 0.001) and putamen (HR 0.441; 95% CI 0.214-0.911; p = 0.027) predicted the development of FOG. In addition, male sex, higher postural instability and gait difficulty score, and a lower Montreal Cognitive Assessment score were also significant predictors of FOG. CONCLUSION: Our finding suggests that presynaptic striatal dopaminergic denervation predicts the later development of FOG in de novo patients with PD, which may provide reliable insight into the mechanism of FOG in terms of nigrostriatal involvement.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 15033 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29420861
[Au] Autor:Chu Y; Buchman AS; Olanow CW; Kordower JH
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurological Sciences, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL.
[Ti] Title:Do subjects with minimal motor features have prodromal Parkinson disease?
[So] Source:Ann Neurol;, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1531-8249
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Understanding the pathological changes underlying mild motor features of the eldery and defining a patient population with prodromal Parkinson disease (PD) are of great clinical importance. It remains unclear, however, how to accurately and specifically diagnose prodromal PD. We examined whether older adults with minimal parkinsonian motor features have nigrostriatal degeneration and α-synuclein pathology consistent with prodromal PD. METHODS: Brain sections were obtained from older adults with a clinical diagnosis of PD (n = 21) and without a clinical diagnosis of PD (n = 27) who underwent motor examination proximate to death. Cases without PD were further dichotomized into no motor deficit (n = 9) or minimal motor features (n = 18) groups using a modified Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale. We performed quantitative unbiased stereological analyses of dopaminergic neurons/terminals and α-synuclein accumulation in the nigrostriatal system. RESULTS: In all subjects with minimal motor features, there were significant reductions in dopaminergic neurons and terminals in the substantia nigra and putamen that were intermediate between subjects with no motor deficit and PD. Phosphorylated α-synuclein inclusions were observed in the substantia nigra that were of similar density to what was seen in PD. Furthermore, there was greater Lewy neuritic pathology in the putamen relative to PD patients. Lastly, neurons with α-synuclein inclusions displayed reductions in tyrosine hydroxylase expression that were comparable in subjects with both minimal motor features and PD. INTERPRETATION: Minimal motor features in older adults may represent prodromal PD and identify at-risk individuals for testing putative neuroprotective interventions that could slow or prevent PD progression. Ann Neurol 2018.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/ana.25179

  9 / 15033 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29410219
[Au] Autor:Alavash M; Lim SJ; Thiel C; Sehm B; Deserno L; Obleser J
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, University of Lübeck, 23562 Lübeck, Germany; Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences, 04103 Leipzig, Germany. Electronic address: mohsen.alavash@uni-luebeck.de.
[Ti] Title:Dopaminergic modulation of hemodynamic signal variability and the functional connectome during cognitive performance.
[So] Source:Neuroimage;172:341-356, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9572
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Dopamine underlies important aspects of cognition, and has been suggested to boost cognitive performance. However, how dopamine modulates the large-scale cortical dynamics during cognitive performance has remained elusive. Using functional MRI during a working memory task in healthy young human listeners, we investigated the effect of levodopa (l-dopa) on two aspects of cortical dynamics, blood oxygen-level-dependent (BOLD) signal variability and the functional connectome of large-scale cortical networks. We here show that enhanced dopaminergic signaling modulates the two potentially interrelated aspects of large-scale cortical dynamics during cognitive performance, and the degree of these modulations is able to explain inter-individual differences in l-dopa-induced behavioral benefits. Relative to placebo, l-dopa increased BOLD signal variability in task-relevant temporal, inferior frontal, parietal and cingulate regions. On the connectome level, however, l-dopa diminished functional integration across temporal and cingulo-opercular regions. This hypo-integration was expressed as a reduction in network efficiency and modularity in more than two thirds of the participants and to different degrees. Hypo-integration co-occurred with relative hyper-connectivity in paracentral lobule and precuneus, as well as posterior putamen. Both, l-dopa-induced BOLD signal variability modulation and functional connectome modulations proved predictive of an individual's l-dopa-induced benefits in behavioral performance, namely response speed and perceptual sensitivity. Lastly, l-dopa-induced modulations of BOLD signal variability were correlated with l-dopa-induced modulation of nodal connectivity and network efficiency. Our findings underline the role of dopamine in maintaining the dynamic range of, and communication between, cortical systems, and their explanatory power for inter-individual differences in benefits from dopamine during cognitive performance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 15033 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29353072
[Au] Autor:Herting MM; Johnson C; Mills KL; Vijayakumar N; Dennison M; Liu C; Goddings AL; Dahl RE; Sowell ER; Whittle S; Allen NB; Tamnes CK
[Ad] Address:Department of Preventive Medicine, Keck School of Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. Electronic address: herting@usc.edu.
[Ti] Title:Development of subcortical volumes across adolescence in males and females: A multisample study of longitudinal changes.
[So] Source:Neuroimage;172:194-205, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9572
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The developmental patterns of subcortical brain volumes in males and females observed in previous studies have been inconsistent. To help resolve these discrepancies, we examined developmental trajectories using three independent longitudinal samples of participants in the age-span of 8-22 years (total 216 participants and 467 scans). These datasets, including Pittsburgh (PIT; University of Pittsburgh, USA), NeuroCognitive Development (NCD; University of Oslo, Norway), and Orygen Adolescent Development Study (OADS; The University of Melbourne, Australia), span three countries and were analyzed together and in parallel using mixed-effects modeling with both generalized additive models and general linear models. For all regions and across all samples, males were found to have significantly larger volumes as compared to females, and significant sex differences were seen in age trajectories over time. However, direct comparison of sample trajectories and sex differences identified within samples were not consistent. The trajectories for the amygdala, putamen, and nucleus accumbens were most consistent between the three samples. Our results suggest that even after using similar preprocessing and analytic techniques, additional factors, such as image acquisition or sample composition may contribute to some of the discrepancies in sex specific patterns in subcortical brain changes across adolescence, and highlight region-specific variations in congruency of developmental trajectories.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher


page 1 of 1504 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information