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[PMID]: 29521060
[Au] Autor:Sliwa J; Rosner-Tenerowicz A; Kryza-Ottou A; Ottou S; Wiatrowski A; Pomorski M; Sozanski L; Zimmer M
[Ad] Address:2nd Clinic of Gynecology and Obstetrics, Wroclaw Medical University, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Analysis of prevalence of selected anamnestic factors among women with pelvic organ prolapse.
[So] Source:Adv Clin Exp Med;27(2):179-184, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1899-5276
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Pelvic organ prolapse is the most frequent medical condition in women in the postmenopausal age. The pathophysiology is multifactorial. OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this paper was to analyze the prevalence of selected anamnestic factors in the population of women treated due to pelvic organ prolapse in the 2nd Department and Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology Wroclaw Medical University (Poland). MATERIAL AND METHODS: A total of 104 medical histories of women treated in the 2nd Department and Clinic of Obstetrics and Gynecology in the years 2012-2013 due to pelvic organ prolapse were analyzed. RESULTS: The most frequent type of defect was the complex defect concerning both cystocele and rectocele. Intensity of dysfunctions was determined by age, obstetric history (parity, newborn's body mass and process of labor), and woman's constitutional characteristic (her BMI and height). A comparison based on the type of defect revealed no differences between the groups except for BMI, which was the highest in the rectocele group (31.15 ±5.84; p = 0.0069). CONCLUSIONS: The multifactorial ethology and differential clinical presentation including several types of this defect make this disorder difficult to prevent and treat. The obtained results confirm that there exists a relation between the data from the medical history and the prevalence of pelvic organ prolapse. Anamnesis can be useful when predicting prevalence and, in the future, may even help to decrease the prevalence of this type of disorder.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.17219/acem/68994

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[PMID]: 29512048
[Au] Autor:Piloni V; Bergamasco M; Melara G; Garavello P
[Ad] Address:Affidea - Diagnostic Imaging Centre, Monselice, Padova, Italy. Vittorio.piloni@libero.it.
[Ti] Title:The clinical value of magnetic resonance defecography in males with obstructed defecation syndrome.
[So] Source:Tech Coloproctol;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1128-045X
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between symptoms of obstructed defecation and findings on magnetic resonance (MR) defecography in males with obstructed defecation syndrome (ODS). METHODS: Thirty-six males with ODS who underwent MR defecography at our institution between March 2013 and February 2016 were asked in a telephone interview about their symptoms and subsequent treatment, either medical or surgical. Patients were divided into 2 groups, one with anismus (Group 1) and one with prolapse without anismus (Group 2). The interaction between ODS type and symptoms with MR findings was assessed by multivariate analysis for categorical data using a hierarchical log-linear model. MR imaging findings included lateral and/or posterior rectocele, rectal prolapse, intussusception, ballooning of levator hiatus with impingement of pelvic organs and dyskinetic puborectalis muscle. RESULTS: There were 21 males with ODS due to anismus (Group 1) and 15 with ODS due to rectal prolapse/intussusception (Group 2). Mean age of the entire group was 53.6 ± 4.1 years (range 18-77 years). Patients in Group 1 were slightly older than those in Group 2 (age peak, sixth decade in 47.6 vs 20.0%, p < 0.05). Symptoms most frequently associated with Group 1 patients included small volume and hard feces (85.0%, p < 0.01), excessive strain at stool (81.0%, p < 0.05), tenesmus and fecaloma formation (57.1 and 42.9%, p < 0.05); symptoms most frequently associated with Group 2 patients included mucous discharge, rectal bleeding and pain (86.7%, p < 0.05), prolonged toilet time (73.3%, p < 0.05), fragmented evacuation with or without digitation (66.7%, p < 0.005). Voiding outflow obstruction was more frequent in Group 1 (19.0 vs 13.3%; p < 0.05), while non-bacterial prostatitis and sexual dysfunction prevailed in Group 2 (26.7 and 46.7%, p < 0.05). At MR defecography, two major categories of findings were detected: a dyskinetic pattern (Type 1), seen in all Group 1 patients, which was characterized by non-relaxing puborectalis muscle, sand-glass configuration of the anorectum, poor emptying rate, limited pelvic floor descent and final residue ≥ 2/3; and a prolapsing pattern (Type 2), seen in all Group 2 patients, which was characterized by rectal prolapse/intussusception, ballooning of the levator hiatus with impingement of the rectal floor and prostatic base, excessive pelvic floor descent and residue ≤ 1/2. Posterolateral outpouching defined as perineal hernia was present in 28.6% of patients in Group 1 and were absent in Group 2. The average levator plate angle on straining differed significantly in the two patterns (21.3° ± 4.1 in Group 1 vs 65.6° ± 8.1 in Group 2; p < 0.05). Responses to the phone interview were obtained from 31 patients (18 of Group 1 and 13 of Group 2, response rate, 86.1%). Patients of Group 1 were always treated without surgery (i.e., biofeedback, dietary regimen, laxatives and/or enemas) which resulted in symptomatic improvement in 12/18 cases (66.6%). Of the patients in Group 2, 2/13 (15.3) underwent surgical repair, consisting of stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) which resulted in symptom recurrence after 6 months and laparoscopic ventral rectopexy which resulted in symptom improvement. The other 11 patients of Group 2 were treated without surgery with symptoms improvement in 3 (27.3%). CONCLUSIONS: The appearance of various abnormalities at MR defecography in men with ODS shows 2 distinct patterns which may have potential relevance for treatment planning, whether conservative or surgical.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10151-018-1759-4

  3 / 1272 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29498141
[Au] Autor:Tirumanisetty P; Prichard D; Fletcher JG; Chakraborty S; Zinsmeister AR; Bharucha AE
[Ad] Address:Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic College of Medicine, Rochester, MN, USA.
[Ti] Title:Normal values for assessment of anal sphincter morphology, anorectal motion, and pelvic organ prolapse with MRI in healthy women.
[So] Source:Neurogastroenterol Motil;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2982
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Endoanal MRI and MR defecography are used to identify anal sphincter injury and disordered defecation. However, few studies have evaluated findings in asymptomatic healthy people. The effects of BMI and parity on rectoanal motion and evacuation are unknown. METHODS: In 113 asymptomatic females (age 50 ± 17 years, Mean ± SD) without risk factors for anorectal trauma, anal sphincter appearance, anorectal motion, and pelvic organ prolapse were evaluated with MRI. The relationship between age, BMI, and parity and structural findings were evaluated with parametric and non-parametric tests. RESULTS: The anal sphincters and puborectalis appeared normal in over 90% of women. During dynamic MRI, the anorectal angle was 100 ± 1º (Mean ± SEM) at rest, 70 ± 2° at squeeze, and 120 ± 2° during defecation. The change in anorectal angle during squeeze (r = -.25, P < .005), but not during evacuation (r = .13, P = .25) was associated with age. In the multivariable models, BMI (P < .01) and parity (P < .01) were, respectively, independently associated with the intersubject variation in the anorectal angle at rest and the angle change during squeeze. Ten percent or fewer women had had descent of the bladder base or uterus 4 cm or more below the pubococcygeal line or a rectocele measuring 4 cm or larger. Only 5% had a patulous anal canal. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to age, BMI and parity also affect anorectal motion in asymptomatic women. These findings provide age-adjusted normal values for rectoanal anatomy and pelvic floor motion.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/nmo.13314

  4 / 1272 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29502568
[Au] Autor:Vijayvargiya P; Camilleri M; Cima RR
[Ad] Address:Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.
[Ti] Title:COL1A1 Mutations Presenting as Descending Perineum Syndrome in a Young Patient With Hypermobility Syndrome.
[So] Source:Mayo Clin Proc;93(3):386-391, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1942-5546
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 22-year-old woman presented with 12 years of progressive constipation; she had increased joint flexibility, hyperextensible skin, and excessive perineal descent on examination. Radiological studies confirmed evidence of rectal evacuation disorder due to descending perineum syndrome, enterocele, and rectocele. In a wide genetic screen (∼611,000 single nucleotide polymorphisms), 4 variations were identified in COL1A1 gene ([rs72656352, Chr17: 50,185,535-50,185,539, deletion], [rs72654794, Chr17: 50,188,575, deletion], [rs72667023, Chr17: 50,198,170, deletion], [rs67828806, Chr17: 50,198,177 G→C]). These mutations result in an increase in the number of base pairs in the C' end, as well as replacement of the glycine amino acid in the N' end, leading to incomplete cleavage of procollagen by proteases and resulting in collagen weakness. Our observations suggest that COL1A1 gene mutations are plausible biological factors predisposing to descending perineum syndrome in association with joint hypermobility in this patient.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 1272 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29409787
[Au] Autor:Berger MB; Kolenic GE; Fenner DE; Morgan DM; DeLancey JOL
[Ad] Address:Pelvic Floor Research Group, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI. Electronic address: mitcberg@umich.edu.
[Ti] Title:Structural, functional, and symptomatic differences between women with rectocele versus cystocele and normal support.
[So] Source:Am J Obstet Gynecol;, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6868
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Prolapse of the anterior and posterior vaginal walls has been generally associated with apical descent and levator ani muscle defects. However, the relative contributions of these factors to the pathophysiology of descent in the different vaginal compartments is not well understood. Furthermore, symptoms uniquely associated with prolapse in these compartments have not been well characterized. OBJECTIVES: The objectives of the study were to compare the associations between the following: (1) apical support, (2) levator ani muscles, and (3) pelvic floor symptoms in women with posterior-predominant prolapse, anterior-predominant prolapse, and normal support. STUDY DESIGN: This is a cross-sectional study with 2 case arms: 60 women with posterior prolapse, 90 with anterior prolapse, and a referent control arm with 103 asymptomatic subjects with normal support, determined from pelvic organ prolapse quantification examinations. Levator muscle defects were graded from magnetic resonance imaging. Vaginal closure forces above resting were measured with an instrumented speculum during maximal contraction. Pelvic floor symptoms were measured via the Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory-Short Form. RESULTS: Mean point C location in controls was -6.9 cm [1.5] (mean [standard deviation]); and was higher in posterior prolapse (-4.7 cm [2.7], 2.2 cm below controls) than the anterior prolapse group (-1.2 cm [4.1]; 5.6 cm below controls, P < .001 for all comparisons). Normal-appearing muscles (ie, muscle without a visible defect) occurred at similar frequencies in posterior prolapse (45%) and controls (51%, P = .43) but less often in anterior prolapse (28%, P ≤ .03 for pairwise comparisons). Major levator ani defects occurred at similar rates in women with posterior (33%) and anterior prolapse (42%, P = .27) but less often in controls (16%, P ≤ .012 for both pairwise comparisons). Similarly, there were significant differences in generated vaginal closure forces across the 3 groups, with the prolapse groups generating weaker closure forces than the control group (P = .004), but the differences between the 2 prolapse groups were not significant after controlling for prolapse size (P = .43). Pelvic floor symptoms were more severe for the posterior (mean Pelvic Floor Distress Inventory score, 129) and anterior prolapse groups (score, 128) than the controls (score, 40.2, P < .001 for both comparisons); the difference between the 2 prolapse groups was not significant (P = .83). CONCLUSION: Posterior-predominant prolapse involves an almost 3-fold less apical descent below normal than anterior-predominant vaginal prolapse. Levator ani defects and muscle impairment also have a lower impact. Pelvic floor symptoms reflect the presence and size of prolapse more than the predominant lax vaginal compartment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 1272 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29500516
[Au] Autor:Tahaoglu AE; Bakir MS; Peker N; Bagli I; Tayyar AT
[Ad] Address:Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Health Sciences University Gazi Yasargil Research and Training Hospital, Talaytepe Mahallesi, Urfa Yolu, 21090 Merkez, Baglar, Diyarbakir, Turkey. alyemre@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Modified laparoscopic pectopexy: short-term follow-up and its effects on sexual function and quality of life.
[So] Source:Int Urogynecol J;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1433-3023
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: This study examined the early outcomes of laparoscopic (LS) pectopexy and evaluated its effects on female sexual function and quality of life (QoL). METHODS: Twenty-two patients with apical prolapse who underwent LS pectopexy were included. Outcomes of the procedure were noted; the Female Sexual Function (FSFI) and Prolapse Quality of Life (P-QOL) questionnaires were completed preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively. RESULTS: There was no evidence of recurrent prolapse or constipation; the percentages of exacerbation of cystocele, rectocele, de novo stress urinary incontinence (SUI), and de novo urgency (UUI) were 4.5%, 9.0%, 4.5%, and 4.5%, respectively (mean follow-up 10.41 months). FSFI and P-QOL scores improved significantly (p < 0.05) postoperatively. CONCLUSIONS: LS pectopexy shows promising results for pelvic organ prolapse (POP) surgery with comparable outcomes. It also improved the FSFI and P-QOL scores in POP patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00192-018-3565-y

  7 / 1272 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29464300
[Au] Autor:Dietz HP; Gómez M; Atan IK; Ferreira CSW
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Neonatology, Sydney Medical School Nepean, University of Sydney, Penrith, Australia. hpdietz@bigpond.com.
[Ti] Title:Association between vaginal parity and rectocele.
[So] Source:Int Urogynecol J;, 2018 Feb 20.
[Is] ISSN:1433-3023
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION AND HYPOTHESIS: Rectocele is common in parous women but also seen in nulliparae. This study was designed to investigate the association between vaginal parity and descent of the rectal ampulla/rectocele depth as determined by translabial ultrasound (TLUS). METHODS: This retrospective observational study involved 1296 women seen in a urogynaecological centre. All had undergone an interview, clinical examination and 4D ultrasound (US) imaging supine and after voiding. Offline analysis of volume data was undertaken blinded against other data. Rectal ampulla position and rectocele depth were measured on Valsalva. A pocket depth of 10 mm was used as a cutoff to define rectocele on imaging. RESULTS: Most women presented with prolapse (53%, n = 686); 810 (63%) complained of obstructed defecation (OD). Clinically, 53% (n = 690) had posterior-compartment prolapse with a mean Bp of -1 [standard deviation (SD)1.5; -3 to 9 cm]. Mean descent of the rectal ampulla was 10 mm below the symphysis (SD 15.8; -50 to 41). A rectocele on imaging was found in 48% (n = 618). On univariate analysis, OD symptoms were strongly associated with rectal descent, rectocele depth and rectocele on imaging (all P < 0.001). The prevalence of a rectocele seen on imaging increased with vaginal parity (P < 0.001). One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) of vaginal parity against rectal descent and rectocele depth showed a dose-response relationship (both P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Vaginal parity was strongly associated with descent of the rectal ampulla and rectocele depth. This relationship approximated dose-response characteristics, with the greatest effect due to the first vaginal delivery.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00192-017-3552-8

  8 / 1272 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29459612
[Au] Autor:Khanam RA; Rubaiat A; Azam AS
[Ad] Address:Professor Rawshan Ara Khanam, Professor, Department of Obstetrics & Gynaecology, Sir Salimullah Medical College, Mitford Road, Dhaka, Bangladesh.
[Ti] Title:Review of Uterine Sling after Five Years of Operation in a 40 Years Lady.
[So] Source:Mymensingh Med J;27(1):193-195, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:2408-8757
[Cp] Country of publication:Bangladesh
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Uterine sling is a operation, done with own rectus sleeve to correct the uterine descend. If necessary correction of cystocele and/or rectocele and or perineal tear done on the same sitting. After 5 years of such operation abdomen of Mrs. X was opened due to ovarian cyst in Nirapad Hospital, Shantinagar, Dhaka, Bangladesh on August 2016. Uterus was found in normal position and size. Rectus sleeves were found attached with the uterus where it was anchored. Omentum was attached over the rectus sleeves and sealed the weak points at both lateral ends of the rectus sleeves through which the sleeves were taken to the abdominal cavity. Omentum was also attached to the posterior leaf of the broad ligaments where the sleeves were sutured to minimize the dead spaces. During this 5 years period the patient felt no discomfort or pain due to the sling or experiences any further descend of the uterus.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180220
[Lr] Last revision date:180220
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 1272 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29292050
[Au] Autor:Sarasa Castelló N; Toth A; Canis M; Botchorishvilli R
[Ad] Address:Department of Gynecologic Surgery, CHU Estaing, Clermont-Ferrand, France. Electronic address: nuriasarasacastello@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Safety of Synthetic Glue Used for Laparoscopic Prolapse Treatment.
[So] Source:J Minim Invasive Gynecol;, 2017 Dec 29.
[Is] ISSN:1553-4669
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:STUDY OBJECTIVE: We detected mesh erosion and serious postoperative complications in 3 women after performing laparoscopic promontofixation (LPF) using glue for mesh fixation. Glue, largely used in hernia surgery repair, is proposed by some gynecologic surgeons because it saves time and is easier to use than traditional sutures. We report 3 cases of postoperative complications after LPF in which glue had been used and provide research in the published literature about the use of glue in LPF. METHODS: A research of glue use in gynecology mesh fixation was performed through PubMed on October 2016. The search was done using the Medical Subject Heading terms "POP" & "Laparoscopy" & "surgical Mesh" and the word either "glue" or "adhesive. Only 2 articles were found: Willecocq et al [1] and Estrade et al [2]. Neither study focused on postoperative complications. In this publication, we accurately edited video surgeries with an instructive purpose. SETTING: University Hospital of Clermont-Ferrand, France. CASE REPORTS: Patient A, a 65-year-old woman, complained of pelvic pain and vaginal discharge 1 month after LPF (polypropylene mesh and glue had been used). Wall mesh exposure and purulent discharge were noted. She received antibiotics and underwent mesh ablation surgery; debris of the glue was easily identified. Patient B, a 65-year-old lady with previous hysterectomy consulted for a bulging feeling in her vagina (classification: cystocele +2; rectocele +3 stage). An LPF was performed using polypropylene soft nonabsorbable mesh and glue. One month later, an apical defect of vaginal epithelialization was detected; she received long estrogenic local treatment but had to undergo surgery when presenting malodorous discharge and mesh exposure. The exposed mesh was removed, and pieces of glue were identified, having avoided mesh attachment. Patient C had a previous abdominal hysterectomy and promontofixation using a polyester mesh with glue. She consulted to us for vaginal mesh erosion covered with purulent discharge 3.5 years after LPF in another center. At the surgery, 1 cm of the prosthesis was identified in the vagina, dissected, and sutured. One year later, she consulted for dyspareunia and purulent discharge; vaginal rigid mesh exposure with an epithelization defect and inflammatory signs was seen. During laparoscopy, prosthetic exposition and glue debris on the prosthesis were identified. DISCUSSION: In all 3 cases, debris of glue were identified in the no integrated mesh area. The suggested reasons of exposure can be the excessive amount of surgical glue applied. Moreover, a large amount of glue may be impairing tissue ingrowth through the mesh pores, causing low fibrosis and poor tissue integration [3]. CONCLUSION: Glue seems to prevent fibrosis from occurring. Its use in pelvic organ prolapse laparoscopic mesh fixation should be done with caution. No prospective studies reporting long-term comorbidities and results have been published.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 1272 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29271223
[Au] Autor:Lee JM; Paik CN; Kim YJ; Kim DB; Chung WC; Lee KM; Yang JM
[Ad] Address:College of Medicine, St. Vincent's Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea.
[Ti] Title:The association between a positive lactulose methane breath test and rectocele in constipated patients.
[So] Source:Rev Esp Enferm Dig;110(2):115-122, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1130-0108
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Rectocele with constipation might be related to methane (CH4) producing intestinal bacteria. We investigated the breath CH4 levels and the clinical characteristics of colorectal motility in constipated patients with rectocele. METHODS: A database of consecutive female outpatients was reviewed for the evaluation of constipation according to the Rome III criteria. The patients underwent the lactulose CH4 breath test (LMBT), colon marker study, anorectal manometry, defecography and bowel symptom questionnaire. The profiles of the lactulose breath test (LBT) in 33 patients with rectocele (with size ≥ 2 cm) and 26 patients with functional constipation (FC) were compared with the breath test results of 30 healthy control subjects. RESULTS: The mean size of rectocele was 3.52 ± 1.06 cm. The rate of a positive LMBT (LMBT+) was significantly higher in patients with rectocele (33.3%) than in those with FC (23.1%) or healthy controls (6.7%) (p = 0.04). Breath CH4 concentration was positively correlated with rectosigmoid colon transit time in rectocele patients (γ = 0.481, p < 0.01). A maximum high pressure zone pressure > 155 mmHg was a significant independent factor of LMBT+ in rectocele patients (OR = 8.93, 95% CI = 1.14-71.4, p = 0.04). CONCLUSIONS: LMBT+ might be expected in constipated patients with rectocele. Moreover, increased rectosigmoid colonic transit or high anorectal pressure might be associated with CH4 breath levels. Breath CH4 could be an important therapeutic target for managing constipated patients with rectocele.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180201
[Lr] Last revision date:180201
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.17235/reed.2017.5017/2017


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