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[PMID]: 29520136
[Au] Autor:Savran O; Ulrik CS
[Ad] Address:Department of Respiratory Medicine, Hvidovre Hospital, Hvidovre, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:Early life insults as determinants of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in adult life.
[So] Source:Int J Chron Obstruct Pulmon Dis;13:683-693, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1178-2005
[Cp] Country of publication:New Zealand
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Early life events may predispose to the development of chronic lung disease in adulthood. Aim: To provide an update on current knowledge of early nongenetic origins of COPD. Materials and methods: Systematic literature review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses guidelines. Results: A total of 16 studies, comprising 69,365 individuals, met the predefined criteria and were included in the present review. Studies have shown that in utero tobacco exposure, low birth weight, preterm birth, and respiratory diseases, primarily asthma and pneumonia, in early childhood are associated with lung function impairment later in childhood, and by that predispose to subsequent development of COPD, although the causal association between childhood respiratory diseases and COPD has been questioned in one study. Environmental tobacco exposure has also been shown to have negative impact on lung function in childhood possibly leading to COPD in adulthood, although it is at present not possible to clearly distinguish between the impact of active and the environmental tobacco exposure on subsequent development of COPD. Conclusion: Tobacco exposure in utero and early life is a risk factor for subsequent development of COPD. Furthermore, low birth weight, lower respiratory tract infections and asthma, including wheezy bronchitis, in childhood also seem to be important determinants for later development of COPD. Early life insults may, therefore, be crucial to COPD development.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2147/COPD.S153555

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[PMID]: 29510663
[Au] Autor:Chatzis O; Darbre S; Pasquier J; Meylan P; Manuel O; Aubert JD; Beck-Popovic M; Masouridi-Levrat S; Ansari M; Kaiser L; Posfay-Barbe KM; Asner SA
[Ad] Address:Paediatric Infectious Disease Unit, Division of General Paediatrics, University Hospitals of Geneva & Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Burden of severe RSV disease among immunocompromised children and adults: a 10 year retrospective study.
[So] Source:BMC Infect Dis;18(1):111, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2334
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is associated with significant mortality rates amongst hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients, with less known about other immunocompromised patients. METHODS: Ten-year retrospective cohort study of immunocompromised patients presenting with RSV disease documented at University Hospitals of Lausanne and Geneva. Severe RSV-related outcomes referred to RSV documented respiratory conditions requiring hospital admission, presenting as lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI) or pneumonia. We used multivariable logistic regression to assess clinical and laboratory correlates of severe RSV disease. RESULTS: From 239 RSV-positive immunocompromised in and out-patients 175 were adults and 64 children of whom 111 (47.8%) presented with LRTI, which resulted in a 38% (89/239) admission rate to hospital. While immunocompromised children were more likely to be admitted to hospital compared to adults (75% vs 62.9%, p = 0.090), inpatients admitted to the intensive care unit (17/19) or those who died (11/11) were mainly adults. From multivariable analyses, adults with solid tumors (OR 5.2; 95% CI: 1.4-20.9 P = 0.015) or those requiring chronic immunosuppressive treatments mainly for rheumatologic conditions (OR 4.1; 95% CI: 1.1-16.0; P = 0.034) were significantly more likely to be admitted to hospital compared to hematopoietic stem cell (HSCT) recipients. Bacterial co-infection was significantly and consistently associated with viral LRTI and pneumonia. CONCLUSIONS: From our findings, RSV-related disease results in a significant burden among adults requiring chronic immunosuppressive treatments for rheumatological conditions and those with solid tumors. As such, systematic screening for respiratory viruses, should be extended to other immunocompromised populations than HSCT recipients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12879-018-3002-3

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[PMID]: 29506511
[Au] Autor:Seibt S; Gilchrist CA; Reed PW; Best EJ; Harnden A; Camargo CA; Grant CC
[Ad] Address:Paediatrics, Taranaki Base Hospital, New Plymouth, New Zealand.
[Ti] Title:Hospital readmissions with acute infectious diseases in New Zealand children < 2 years of age.
[So] Source:BMC Pediatr;18(1):98, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2431
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Infectious diseases are the leading cause of hospital admissions in young children. Hospitalisation with an infectious disease is a recurrent event for some children. Our objective was to describe risk factors for infectious disease readmission following hospital admission with an infectious disease in the first two years of life. METHODS: We performed a national cohort study of New Zealand children, born 2005-2009, with an infectious disease admission before age 24 months. Children readmitted with an infectious disease within 12 months of the first infectious disease admission were identified. Every infectious disease admission was categorised as a respiratory, enteric, skin and soft tissue, urinary or other infection. Independent associations of demographic and child health factors with infectious disease readmission were determined using multiple variable logistic regression. RESULTS: From 2005 to 2011, there were 69,902 infectious disease admissions for 46,657 children less than two years old. Of these 46,657 children, 10,205 (22%) had at least one infectious disease readmission within 12 months of their first admission. The first infectious disease admission was respiratory (54%), enteric (15%), skin or soft tissue (7%), urinary (4%) or other (20%). Risk of infectious disease readmission was increased if the first infectious disease admission was respiratory (OR = 1.87, 95% CI 1.78-1.95) but not if it was in any other infectious disease category. Risk factors for respiratory infectious disease readmission were male gender, Pacific or Maori ethnicity, greater household deprivation, presence of a complex chronic condition, or a first respiratory infectious disease admission during autumn or of ≥3 days duration. Fewer factors (younger age, male gender, presence of a complex chronic condition) were associated with enteric infection readmission. The presence of a complex chronic condition was the only factor associated with urinary tract infection readmission and none of the factors were associated with skin or soft tissue infection readmission. CONCLUSIONS: In children less than two years old, infectious disease readmission risk is increased if the first infectious disease admission is a respiratory infectious disease but not if it is another infectious disease category. Risk factors for respiratory infectious disease readmission are different from those for other infectious disease readmissions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12887-018-1079-x

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[PMID]: 29444768
[Au] Autor:Shen X; Lu M; Feng R; Cheng J; Chai J; Xie M; Dong X; Jiang T; Wang D
[Ad] Address:School of Health Service Management, Anhui Medical University, Hefei, China.
[Ti] Title:Web-Based Just-in-Time Information and Feedback on Antibiotic Use for Village Doctors in Rural Anhui, China: Randomized Controlled Trial.
[So] Source:J Med Internet Res;20(2):e53, 2018 Feb 14.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8871
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Excessive use of antibiotics is very common worldwide, especially in rural China; various measures that have been used in curbing the problem have shown only marginal effects. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to test an innovative intervention that provided just-in-time information and feedback (JITIF) to village doctors on care of common infectious diseases. METHODS: The information component of JITIF consisted of a set of theory or evidence-based ingredients, including operation guideline, public commitment, and takeaway information, whereas the feedback component tells each participating doctor about his or her performance scores and percentages of antibiotic prescriptions. These ingredients were incorporated together in a synergetic way via a Web-based aid. Evaluation of JITIF adopted a randomized controlled trial design involving 24 village clinics randomized into equal control and intervention arms. Measures used included changes between baseline and endpoint (1 year after baseline) in terms of: percentages of patients with symptomatic respiratory or gastrointestinal tract infections (RTIs or GTIs) being prescribed antibiotics, delivery of essential service procedures, and patients' beliefs and knowledge about antibiotics and infection prevention. Two researchers worked as a group in collecting the data at each site clinic. One performed nonparticipative observation of the service process, while the other performed structured exit interviews about patients' beliefs and knowledge. Data analysis comprised mainly of: (1) descriptive estimations of beliefs or knowledge, practice of indicative procedures, and use of antibiotics at baseline and endpoint for intervention and control groups and (2) chi-square tests for the differences between these groups. RESULTS: A total of 1048 patients completed the evaluation, including 532 at baseline (intervention=269, control=263) and 516 at endpoint (intervention=262, control=254). Patients diagnosed with RTIs and GTIs accounted for 76.5% (407/532) and 23.5% (125/352), respectively, at baseline and 80.8% (417/532) and 19.2% (99/532) at endpoint. JITIF resulted in substantial improvement in delivery of essential service procedures (2.6%-24.8% at baseline on both arms and at endpoint on the control arm vs 88.5%-95.0% at endpoint on the intervention arm, P<.001), beliefs favoring rational antibiotics use (11.5%-39.8% at baseline on both arms and at endpoint on the control arm vs 19.8%-62.6% at endpoint on the intervention arm, P<.001) and knowledge about side effects of antibiotics (35.7% on the control arm vs 73.7% on the intervention arm, P<.001), measures for managing or preventing RTIs (39.1% vs 66.7%, P=.02), and measures for managing or preventing GTIs (46.8% vs 69.2%, P<.001). It also reduced antibiotics prescription (from 88.8%-62.3%, P<.001), and this decrease was consistent for RTIs (87.1% vs 64.3%, P<.001) and GTIs (94.7% vs 52.4%, P<.001). CONCLUSIONS: JITIF is effective in controlling antibiotics prescription at least in the short term and may provide a low-cost and sustainable solution to the widespread excessive use of antibiotics in rural China.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.2196/jmir.8922

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[PMID]: 29427763
[Au] Autor:Haider MSH; Deeba F; Khan WH; Naqvi IH; Ali S; Ahmed A; Broor S; Alsenaidy HA; Alsenaidy AM; Dohare R; Parveen S
[Ad] Address:Centre for Interdisciplinary Research in Basic Sciences, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi, India.
[Ti] Title:Global distribution of NA1 genotype of respiratory syncytial virus and its evolutionary dynamics assessed from the past 11 years.
[So] Source:Infect Genet Evol;60:140-150, 2018 Feb 08.
[Is] ISSN:1567-7257
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a potent pathogen having global distribution. The main purpose of this study was to gain an insight into distribution pattern of the NA1 genotype of group A RSV across the globe together with its evolutionary dynamics. We focused on the second hypervariable region of the G protein gene and used the same for Phylogenetic, Bayesian and Network analyses. Eighteen percent of the samples collected from 500 symptomatic pediatric patients with acute respiratory tract infection (ARI) were found to be positive for RSV during 2011-15 from New Delhi, India. Of these, group B RSV was predominant and clustered into two different genotypes (BA and SAB4). Similarly, group A viruses clustered into two genotypes (NA1 and ON1). The data set from the group A viruses included 543 sequences from 23 different countries including 67 strains from India. The local evolutionary dynamics suggested consistent virus population of NA1 genotype in India during 2009 to 2014. The molecular clock analysis suggested that most recent common ancestor of group A and NA1 genotype have emerged in during the years 1953 and 2000, respectively. The global evolutionary rates of group A viruses and NA1 genotype were estimated to be 3.49 × 10 (95% HPD, 2.90-4.17 × 10 ) and 3.56 × 10 (95% HPD, 2.91 × 10 -4.18 × 10 ) substitution/site/year, respectively. Analysis of the NA1 genotype of group A RSV reported during 11 years i.e. from 2004 to 2014 showed its dominance in 21 different countries across the globe reflecting its evolutionary dynamics. The Network analysis showed highly intricate but an inconsistent pattern of haplotypes of NA1 genotype circulating in the world. Present study seems to be first comprehensive attempt on global distribution and evolution of NA1 genotype augmenting the optimism towards the vaccine development.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 51132 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518064
[Au] Autor:Xu K; Li X
[Ad] Address:Department of Respiratory Medicine, The 3rd Hospital of Anhui Medical University, Hefei 1st People's Hospital, Hefei, Anhui, China (mainland).
[Ti] Title:Two risk factors for depression in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.
[So] Source:Med Sci Monit;24:1417-1423, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1643-3750
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND Depression is a major comorbidity in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD). The aim of this study was to explore cytokine levels, and socio-demographic and clinical factors that may affect COPD-related depression.  MATERIAL AND METHODS This prospective study enrolled 53 consecutive COPD patients, without any other lower respiratory tract diseases, psychiatric disorders, family history or cognitive disorders, who were hospitalized in the Department of Respiratory Medicine of Hefei First People's Hospital, China between October 2015 and October 2016. All patients were investigated for depression, and the serum levels of C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8) and Tumor Necrosis Factor-α (TNF-α) were measured. The factors that may affect COPD-related depression were analyzed.  RESULTS There were 40 (75.47%) patients with depression. There were differences in gender, smoking, time of cough, education, forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) and serum CRP levels between COPD patients with or without depression. In a univariate analysis, gender, smoking, education, FEV1, time of cough and serum CRP level were associated with depression. In a multivariate logistic regression model, serum CRP level and FEV1 were risk factors for depression.   CONCLUSIONS Male patients, heavy smoking, higher academic qualifications, cough, and high serum CRP level were linked to higher incidence rate of depression. High serum CRP level and low FEV1 were the risk factors for COPD-related depression.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 51132 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29432224
[Au] Autor:Poddighe D
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, Nazarbayev University School of Medicine, Astana, Kazakhstan.
[Ti] Title:Extra-pulmonary diseases related to Mycoplasma pneumoniae in children: recent insights into the pathogenesis.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Rheumatol;, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1531-6963
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Providing an overview on Mycoplasma pneumoniae-related extra-pulmonary diseases (MpEPDs) in children, who represent the preferred target population by those complications, and discussing the main pathogenic mechanisms implicated or potentially involved. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent evidences supported the fact that M. pneumoniae is more than an extra-cellular pathogen colonizing epithelial cells of the respiratory tract. It is able to penetrate the cell membrane of host cells and to invade the respiratory mucosa, leading to pronounced inflammatory responses and also spreading outside the respiratory system, to some extent. Thus, direct and indirect (immune-mediated) mechanisms have been described in M. pneumoniae infections, but the latter ones have been mainly implicated in MpEPDs, as reviewed here. Recently, interesting insights have been provided, especially as concern neurologic complications, and new potential mechanisms of disease have been emerging for autoimmunity. SUMMARY: The awareness of the occurrence of MpEPDs, showing very variable clinical expressions, could promote a correct diagnosis and an appropriate treatment. The knowledge of disease mechanisms in MpEPDs is largely incomplete, but recent advances from clinical studies and murine models might promote and direct future research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/BOR.0000000000000494

  8 / 51132 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29203758
[Au] Autor:Stefanski M; Brulinski K; Stefanska M
[Ad] Address:Oddzial Chirurgii Klatki Piersiowej, Centrum Pulmonologii I Torakochirurgii, Bystra, Polska.
[Ti] Title:[Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (dipnech) - an overview of the cases diagnosed at the department of thoracic surgery in the years 2010-2014].
[So] Source:Wiad Lek;70(5):1005-1012, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0043-5147
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:pol
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) are present in the normal lungs with the incidence of 1 in 2500 epithelial cells. They usually proliferate in the presence of reactive processes related to inflammation and fibrosis of the lung parenchyma. The division of pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia proposed by Travis et al. additionally distinguished diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH) or proliferation that occurs in people without reactive hyperplasia risk factors. The confirmation of the DIPNECH diagnosis requires staining of biopsy specimens using the immunohistochemical technique for neuroendocrine markers. AIM: The aim of this study is to overview the cases of 5 patients in whom the histopathological DIPNECH diagnosis was made in the process of invasive diagnostics performed at the Department of Thoracic Surgery. The aim of the study is to evaluate typical clinical, functional, radiological and histopathological features of this rare disease syndrome. MATERIAL AND METHODS: In the period from April 2010 to June 2014, five patients with lesions in the lungs were subjected to invasive diagnostics. Histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations of the collected specimens were used to make the DIPNECH diagnosis in these patients. The natural history of the disease was traced based on a 5-year follow-up in one of the patients. In addition, we analyzed the literature with regard to the described cases. CONCLUSIONS: Thanks to the early diagnosis of non-specific lesions in the lungs, typical carcinoid which develops on the basis of discussed DIPNECH, was found in the resected material in two out of five operated patients. The accurate diagnosis of DIPNECH allows for the implementation of appropriate treatment and channels further management of the patient into the right direction.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Hyperplasia/diagnostic imaging
Hyperplasia/pathology
Lung Diseases/diagnostic imaging
Lung Diseases/pathology
Neuroendocrine Cells/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Cell Proliferation
Female
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Middle Aged
Respiratory Function Tests
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171206
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28459618
[Au] Autor:Celedón JC; Burchard EG; Schraufnagel D; Castillo-Salgado C; Schenker M; Balmes J; Neptune E; Cummings KJ; Holguin F; Riekert KA; Wisnivesky JP; Garcia JGN; Roman J; Kittles R; Ortega VE; Redline S; Mathias R; Thomas A; Samet J; Ford JG; American Thoracic Society and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute
[Ti] Title:An American Thoracic Society/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Workshop Report: Addressing Respiratory Health Equality in the United States.
[So] Source:Ann Am Thorac Soc;14(5):814-826, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:2325-6621
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Health disparities related to race, ethnicity, and socioeconomic status persist and are commonly encountered by practitioners of pediatric and adult pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine in the United States. To address such disparities and thus progress toward equality in respiratory health, the American Thoracic Society and the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a workshop in May of 2015. The workshop participants addressed health disparities by focusing on six topics, each of which concluded with a panel discussion that proposed recommendations for research on racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine. Such recommendations address best practices to advance research on respiratory health disparities (e.g., characterize broad ethnic groups into subgroups known to differ with regard to a disease of interest), risk factors for respiratory health disparities (e.g., study the impact of new tobacco or nicotine products on respiratory diseases in minority populations), addressing equity in access to healthcare and quality of care (e.g., conduct longitudinal studies of the impact of the Affordable Care Act on respiratory and sleep disorders), the impact of personalized medicine on disparities research (e.g., implement large studies of pharmacogenetics in minority populations), improving design and methodology for research studies in respiratory health disparities (e.g., use study designs that reduce participants' burden and foster trust by engaging participants as decision-makers), and achieving equity in the pulmonary, critical care, and sleep medicine workforce (e.g., develop and maintain robust mentoring programs for junior faculty, including local and external mentors). Addressing these research needs should advance efforts to reduce, and potentially eliminate, respiratory, sleep, and critical care disparities in the United States.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ethnic Groups/statistics & numerical data
Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data
Health Status Disparities
Healthcare Disparities
Minority Groups/statistics & numerical data
Respiratory Tract Diseases/epidemiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Health Policy
Humans
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (U.S.)
Pulmonary Medicine
Social Class
Societies, Medical
United States
[Pt] Publication type:CONSENSUS DEVELOPMENT CONFERENCE, NIH; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1513/AnnalsATS.201702-167WS

  10 / 51132 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29514906
[Au] Autor:Wan Y; Kang G; Sreenivasan C; Daharsh L; Zhang J; Fan W; Wang D; Moriyama H; Li F; Li Q
[Ad] Address:Nebraska Center for Virology, School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, NE 68583, USA.
[Ti] Title:A DNA vaccine expressing consensus hemagglutinin-esterase fusion protein protected guinea pigs from infection by two lineages of influenza D virus.
[So] Source:J Virol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1098-5514
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Two lineages of Influenza D virus (IDV) have been found to infect cattle and promote bovine respiratory disease complex (BRDC), one of the most commonly diagnosed causes of morbidity and mortality within the cattle industry. Furthermore, IDV can infect other economically important domestic livestock including pigs and has the potential to infect humans, which necessitates the need for an efficacious vaccine. In this study, we designed a DNA vaccine expressing consensus hemagglutinin-esterase-fusion (HEF) protein (FluD-Vax) and tested its protective efficacy against two lineages of IDV (D/OK and D/660) in guinea pigs. Animals that received FluD-Vax (n=12) developed appreciable titers of neutralizing antibodies against IDV lineage representatives, D/OK and D/660. Importantly, vaccinated animals were protected against intranasal challenge with IDV (3E5 TCID ) D/OK (n=6) or D/600 (n=6) based on the absence of viral RNA in necropsied tissues (5 and 7 days post challenge) using qRT-PCR and in situ hybridization (ISH). In contrast, animals that received a sham DNA vaccine (n=12) had no detectable neutralizing antibodies against IDV and viral RNA was readily detectable in respiratory tract tissues after intranasal challenge with IDV (3E5 TCID ) D/OK (n=6) or D/660 (n=6). Using a TUNEL assay, we found that IDV D/OK and D/600 infections induced apoptosis in epithelial cells lining alveoli and bronchioles as well as non-epithelial cells in lung tissues. Our results have demonstrated for the first time that the consensus IDV HEF DNA vaccine can elicit complete protection against infection from two lineages of IDV in the guinea pig model. IDV infection has been associated with BRDC, one of the most devastating diseases of the cattle population. Moreover, with broad host range and high environmental stability, IDV has the potential to further gain virulence, or even infect humans. An efficacious vaccine is needed to prevent infection and stop potential cross-species transmission. In this study, we designed a DNA vaccine encoding the consensus HEF of two lineages of IDV (D/OK and D/660) and tested its efficacy in a guinea pig model. Our results showed that the consensus DNA vaccine elicited high-titer neutralizing antibodies and achieved sterilizing protection against two lineage-representative IDV intra-nasal infections. To our knowledge, this is the first study showing a DNA vaccine-expressing consensus HEF is efficacious in preventing different lineages of influenza D virus infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher


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