Database : MEDLINE
Search on : rickettsia and infections [Words]
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[PMID]: 29501703
[Au] Autor:Morand A; Angelakis E; Ben Chaabane M; Parola P; Raoult D; Gautret P
[Ad] Address:Aix Marseille Univ, IRD, AP-HM, MEPHI, IHU-Méditerranée Infection, Marseille, France; Department of Pediatrics, Timone Hospital, AP-HM, Marseille, France.
[Ti] Title:Seek and Find! PCR analyses of skin infections in West-European travelers returning from abroad with an eschar.
[So] Source:Travel Med Infect Dis;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1873-0442
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Skin infections are among the leading causes of diseases in travelers. Diagnosing pathogens could be difficult. METHOD: We applied molecular assays for the diagnostic of a large collection of skin biopsies and swabs from travelers with suspected skin infections. All samples were tested by qPCR for Coxiella burnetti, Bartonella sp., Rickettsia sp., Borrelia sp., Ehrlichia sp., Tropheryma whipplei, Francisella tularensis, Mycobacteria sp., Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pyogenes, Leishmania spp., Ortho poxvirus and Para poxvirus and then screened for the presence of bacteria by PCR amplification and sequencing, targeting the 16S rRNA gene. RESULTS: From January 2009 to January 2017, 100 international travelers presenting with a suspected skin infection were enrolled. We detected 51 patients with an identified pathogen on skin samples. Travelers presenting with eschars were more likely to have a positive PCR sample (n = 44/76, 57.9%) compared to other patients (n = 7/24, 29.2%). Spotted fever group Rickettsia (n = 28) was the most frequently detected pathogens (19 R. africae, 6 R. conorii, 3 R. mongolitimonae); S. aureus were detected in 11 patients; S. pyogenes in 3; Leishmania sp.; M. leprae and B. henselae in 1 patient, respectively. CONCLUSION: By targeting the most commonly encountered causative agents of travel-related skin infections, our strategy provides a sensitive and rapid diagnostic method.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 7055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28449088
[Au] Autor:Rajapakse S; Weeratunga P; Sivayoganathan S; Fernando SD
[Ad] Address:Tropical Medicine Research Unit, Department of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of Colombo, 25, Kynsey Road, Colombo 08, Sri Lanka.
[Ti] Title:Clinical manifestations of scrub typhus.
[So] Source:Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg;111(2):43-54, 2017 02 01.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3503
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The mite-borne rickettsial zoonosis scrub typhus is widely prevalent in parts of Southeast and Far East Asia, and northern Australia. The disease is an acute febrile illness, associated with rash and often an eschar, which responds dramatically to treatment with antibiotics. In some cases it results in a serious illness leading to multiple organ involvement and death. The disease manifestations are thought to result from a systemic vasculitis, caused by both direct effects of the organisms as well as an exaggerated immune response, although little is understood about its pathogenesis. A wide spectrum of clinical manifestations, affecting nearly every organ system, have been described with scrub typhus. Some of these manifestations are serious and life threatening. In this systematic review, we summarise the typical and atypical manifestations of scrub typhus reported in the literature. Awareness of these unusual manifestations will hopefully guide clinicians towards diagnosing the condition early, and initiating early appropriate antibiotics and other supportive measures.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Scrub Typhus
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Orientia tsutsugamushi
Scrub Typhus/complications
Scrub Typhus/diagnosis
Scrub Typhus/immunology
Scrub Typhus/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170428
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trx017

  3 / 7055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390142
[Au] Autor:Zélé F; Santos I; Olivieri I; Weill M; Duron O; Magalhães S
[Ad] Address:Centre for Ecology, Evolution and Environmental Changes (cE3c), Faculdade de Ciências da Universidade de Lisboa, Edificio C2, Piso-3, Campo Grande, 1749016 Lisbon, Portugal.
[Ti] Title:Endosymbiont diversity and prevalence in herbivorous spider mite populations in South-Western Europe.
[So] Source:FEMS Microbiol Ecol;94(4), 2018 Apr 01.
[Is] ISSN:1574-6941
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Bacterial endosymbionts are known as important players of the evolutionary ecology of their hosts. However, their distribution, prevalence and diversity are still largely unexplored. To this aim, we investigated infections by the most common bacterial reproductive manipulators in herbivorous spider mites of South-Western Europe. Across 16 populations belonging to three Tetranychus species, Wolbachia was the most prevalent (ca. 61%), followed by Cardinium (12%-15%), while only few individuals were infected by Rickettsia (0.9%-3%), and none carried Arsenophonus or Spiroplasma. These endosymbionts are here reported for the first time in Tetranychus evansi and Tetranychus ludeni, and showed variable infection frequencies between and within species, with several cases of coinfections. Moreover, Cardinium was more prevalent in Wolbachia-infected individuals, which suggests facilitation between these symbionts. Finally, sequence comparisons revealed no variation of the Wolbachia wsp and Rickettsia gtlA genes, but some diversity of the Cardinium 16S rRNA, both between and within populations of the three mite species. Some of the Cardinium sequences identified belonged to distantly-related clades, and the lack of association between these sequences and spider mite mitotypes suggests repeated host switching of Cardinium. Overall, our results reveal a complex community of symbionts in this system, opening the path for future studies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/femsec/fiy015

  4 / 7055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29450514
[Ti] Title:Our Forefathers' Knowledge.
[So] Source:JAMA;319(6):620, 2018 02 13.
[Is] ISSN:1538-3598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: History of Medicine
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: History, 19th Century
History, 20th Century
Humans
Quackery/history
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/etiology
Tuberculosis, Pulmonary/history
Typhus, Epidemic Louse-Borne/history
Typhus, Epidemic Louse-Borne/therapy
[Pt] Publication type:CLASSICAL ARTICLE; HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180217
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jama.2017.12237

  5 / 7055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29258829
[Au] Autor:Kissenkötter J; Hansen S; Böhlken-Fascher S; Ademowo OG; Oyinloye OE; Bakarey AS; Dobler G; Tappe D; Patel P; Czerny CP; Abd El Wahed A
[Ad] Address:Microbiology and Animal Hygiene, University of Goettingen, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Development of a pan-rickettsial molecular diagnostic test based on recombinase polymerase amplification assay.
[So] Source:Anal Biochem;544:29-33, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0309
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Rickettsioses are zoonotic vector-transmitted bacterial infections leading to flu-like symptoms and can progress to severe illness in humans. The gold standard for diagnosis of rickettsial infections is the indirect immunofluorescence assay, a serological method which is not suitable for pathogen identification during the acute phase of the disease. Therefore, several real-time PCR assays were developed. These assays are very sensitive, but require high-equipped laboratories and well-trained personnel. Hence, in this study, a rapid point-of-need detection method was developed to detect all Rickettsia species. The 23S and 16S rRNA genes were targeted to develop a recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA) assay. Both 23S and 16S_RPA assays required between seven to ten minutes to amplify and detect one or ten DNA molecules/reaction, respectively. The 16S_RPA assay detected all tested species, whereas the 23S_RPA assay identified only species of the spotted fever and transitional rickettsial groups. All results were compared with real-time PCR assays directed against the same rickettsial genes. The RPA assays are easy to handle and produced quicker results in comparison to real-time PCRs. Both RPA assays were implemented in a mobile suitcase laboratory to ease the use in rural areas. This method can help to provide rapid management of rickettsial infections.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 7055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29477960
[Au] Autor:Chisu V; Foxi C; Mannu R; Satta G; Masala G
[Ad] Address:Istituto Zooprofilattico Sperimentale della Sardegna, Sassari, Italy. Electronic address: valentinachisu@virgilio.it.
[Ti] Title:A five-year survey of tick species and identification of tick-borne bacteria in Sardinia, Italy.
[So] Source:Ticks Tick Borne Dis;, 2018 Feb 17.
[Is] ISSN:1877-9603
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sardinia is a hotspot for studying tick-borne diseases in the Mediterranean region, where cases of notifiable tick-borne diseases are increasing. The aim of this study was to determine the presence of tick-borne bacteria of medical and veterinary importance in ixodid ticks collected from domestic and wild animals, humans, and vegetation from different collection sites in Sardinia. Using standard PCR and sequencing techniques, the presence of Rickettsia, Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Bartonella species, as well as Coxiella burnetii was evaluated. A total of 1619 ticks were morphologically identified as Rhipicephalus sanguineus sensu lato, R. bursa, R. annulatus, Dermacentor marginatus, Haemaphysalis punctata, Ha. sulcata, Hyalomma lusitanicum, H. marginatum, Ixodes festai (sometimes referred to erroneously as I. ventalloi), and Argas reflexus. Results indicated the presence of several circulating pathogens in Sardinian ticks. DNA of Rickettsia species was detected in 58 out of 1619 (4%) belonging to R. sanguineus s.l., D. marginatus, Ha. punctata, H. marginatum, and I. festai species. Ehrlichia canis DNA was detected in 33 out of 1619 ticks (2%) belonging to R. sanguineus s.l., R. bursa, and Ha. punctata species. A total of 61 out of 1619 (4%) ticks (R. sanguineus s. l., R. bursa, Ha. punctata, and I. festai) tested positive for Anaplasma spp. Coxiella burnetii was detected in 21 out of 1619 (1%) ticks belonging to R. sanguineus s.l., R. bursa, R. annulatus, and H. marginatum species. Five R. sanguineus s.l. and one R. bursa ticks were positive for the presence of Bartonella sp. 16S rRNA gene. Our findings expand the knowledge on tick-borne microorganism repertoires and tick distribution in Sardinia. Tick distribution should be monitored for effective control of these arthropods and the infections they transmit.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 7055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29453420
[Au] Autor:Tokarz R; Mishra N; Tagliafierro T; Sameroff S; Caciula A; Chauhan L; Patel J; Sullivan E; Gucwa A; Fallon B; Golightly M; Molins C; Schriefer M; Marques A; Briese T; Lipkin WI
[Ad] Address:Center for Infection and Immunity, Mailman School of Public Health, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA. rt2249@columbia.edu.
[Ti] Title:A multiplex serologic platform for diagnosis of tick-borne diseases.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;8(1):3158, 2018 Feb 16.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tick-borne diseases are the most common vector-borne diseases in the United States, with serology being the primary method of diagnosis. We developed the first multiplex, array-based assay for serodiagnosis of tick-borne diseases called the TBD-Serochip. The TBD-Serochip was designed to discriminate antibody responses to 8 major tick-borne pathogens present in the United States, including Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Babesia microti, Borrelia burgdorferi, Borrelia miyamotoi, Ehrlichia chaffeensis, Rickettsia rickettsii, Heartland virus and Powassan virus. Each assay contains approximately 170,000 12-mer linear peptides that tile along the protein sequence of the major antigens from each agent with 11 amino acid overlap. This permits accurate identification of a wide range of specific immunodominant IgG and IgM epitopes that can then be used to enhance diagnostic accuracy and integrate differential diagnosis into a single assay. To test the performance of the TBD-Serochip, we examined sera from patients with confirmed Lyme disease, babesiosis, anaplasmosis, and Powassan virus disease. We identified a wide range of specific discriminatory epitopes that facilitated accurate diagnosis of each disease. We also identified previously undiagnosed infections. Our results indicate that the TBD-Serochip is a promising tool for a differential diagnosis not available with currently employed serologic assays for TBDs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-21349-2

  8 / 7055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29380798
[Au] Autor:Babu K; Sudheer B; Murthy KR
[Ad] Address:Prabha Eye Clinic and Research Center, Vittala International Institute of Ophthalmology, Bengaluru, Karnataka, India.
[Ti] Title:Bilateral arterial occlusions masking retinitis in a HIV-positive male.
[So] Source:Indian J Ophthalmol;66(2):332-334, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1998-3689
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We report an interesting case of 36-year-old HIV-positive male with uveitis, cilioretinal artery occlusion in OD, and superotemporal branch retinal artery occlusion in OS. Hypercoagulability, cardiovascular, and rheumatologic workups were unremarkable. Aqueous taps were negative for toxoplasma, viruses, and MTb by multiplex polymerase chain reaction. Patches of retinitis were seen on clearing of retinal edema. Serology was positive for toxoplasma and rickettsia. Management included doxycycline, azithromycin, bactrim DS, and oral steroids. Vision improvement to 6/60 and 6/24 in OD and OS refer to the right eye and left eye, respectively, were noted at 4-month follow-up. Infections should be considered in arterial occlusions associated with inflammation in HIV-positive individuals.
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/ijo.IJO_563_17

  9 / 7055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28743316
[Au] Autor:Kerins JL; Dorevitch S; Dworkin MS
[Ad] Address:School of Public Health, University of Illinois at Chicago,Chicago, Illinois,USA.
[Ti] Title:Spotted Fever Group Rickettsioses (SFGR): weather and incidence in Illinois.
[So] Source:Epidemiol Infect;145(12):2466-2472, 2017 09.
[Is] ISSN:1469-4409
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The purpose of this study was to identify predictors of increasing incidence of Spotted Fever Group rickettsioses (SFGR) in Illinois, with a specific focus on weather variables. We analysed cases of SFGR reported to the Illinois Department of Public Health from 2004 to 2013. Surveillance definitions changed in 2008 and 2010, but those changes alone did not account for observed spikes in incidence in 2008, 2012 and 2013. A total of 590 cases of SFGR occurred, with the majority in the southernmost portion of the state. Only 3·4% of the reported cases were considered confirmed under the case definition. Increased mean winter temperature (IRR 1·32, CI 1·25-1·40) and increased precipitation (IRR 1·08, CI 1·04-1·11) were each associated with increased incidence of SFGR. Our findings show that weather appears to play a significant role in explaining the increasing annual incidence of SFGR in Illinois.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Rickettsia Infections/epidemiology
Rickettsia/physiology
Weather
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Illinois/epidemiology
Incidence
Rickettsia Infections/microbiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, P.H.S.
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170727
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1017/S0950268817001492

  10 / 7055 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29390021
[Au] Autor:Noden BH; Martin J; Carrillo Y; Talley JL; Ochoa-Corona FM
[Ad] Address:Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, Oklahoma, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Development of a loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay for rapid screening of ticks and fleas for spotted fever group rickettsia.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0192331, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The importance of tick and flea-borne rickettsia infections is increasingly recognized worldwide. While increased focus has shifted in recent years to the development of point-of-care diagnostics for various vector-borne diseases in humans and animals, little research effort has been devoted to their integration into vector surveillance and control programs, particularly in resource-challenged countries. One technology which may be helpful for large scale vector surveillance initiatives is loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The aim of this study was to develop a LAMP assay to detect spotted fever group (SFG) rickettsia DNA from field-collected ticks and fleas and compare with published end-point PCR results. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A Spotted Fever Group rickettsia-specific loop-mediated isothermal amplification (SFGR-LAMP) assay was developed using primers based on a region of the R. rickettsii 17kDa protein gene. The sensitivity, specificity, and reproducibility of the assay were evaluated. The assay was then compared with the results of end-point PCR assays for pooled tick and flea samples obtained from field-based surveillance studies. The sensitivity of the SFGR-LAMP assay was 0.00001 ng/µl (25µl volume) which was 10 times more sensitive than the 17kDa protein gene end-point PCR used as the reference method. The assay only recognized gDNA from SFG and transitional group (TRG) rickettsia species tested but did not detect gDNA from typhus group (TG) rickettsia species or closely or distantly related bacterial species. The SFGR-LAMP assay detected the same positives from a set of pooled tick and flea samples detected by end-point PCR in addition to two pooled flea samples not detected by end-point PCR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge, this is the first study to develop a functional LAMP assay to initially screen for SFG and TRG rickettsia pathogens in field-collected ticks and fleas. With a high sensitivity and specificity, the results indicate the potential use as a field-based surveillance tool for tick and flea-borne rickettsial pathogens in resource-challenged countries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180218
[Lr] Last revision date:180218
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192331


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