Database : MEDLINE
Search on : rift and valley and fever [Words]
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[PMID]: 28457675
[Au] Autor:Wichgers Schreur PJ; van Keulen L; Kant J; Kortekaas J
[Ad] Address:Department of Virology, Wageningen Bioveterinary Research, Lelystad, The Netherlands. Electronic address: paul.wichgersschreur@wur.nl.
[Ti] Title:Four-segmented Rift Valley fever virus-based vaccines can be applied safely in ewes during pregnancy.
[So] Source:Vaccine;35(23):3123-3128, 2017 05 25.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) causes severe and recurrent outbreaks on the African continent and the Arabian Peninsula and continues to expand its habitat. This mosquito-borne virus, belonging to the genus Phlebovirus of the family Bunyaviridae contains a tri-segmented negative-strand RNA genome. Previously, we developed four-segmented RVFV (RVFV-4s) variants by splitting the M-genome segment into two M-type segments each encoding one of the structural glycoproteins; Gn or Gc. Vaccination/challenge experiments with mice and lambs subsequently showed that RVFV-4s induces protective immunity against wild-type virus infection after a single administration. To demonstrate the unprecedented safety of RVFV-4s, we here report that the virus does not cause encephalitis after intranasal inoculation of mice. A study with pregnant ewes subsequently revealed that RVFV-4s does not cause viremia and does not cross the ovine placental barrier, as evidenced by the absence of teratogenic effects and virus in the blood and organs of the fetuses. Altogether, these results show that the RVFV-4s vaccine virus can be applied safely in pregnant ewes.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Rift Valley Fever/prevention & control
Rift Valley fever virus/genetics
Rift Valley fever virus/immunology
Sheep Diseases/prevention & control
Viral Vaccines/administration & dosage
Viral Vaccines/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Antibodies, Neutralizing/blood
Antibodies, Viral/blood
Encephalitis, Viral/etiology
Encephalitis, Viral/veterinary
Female
Genome, Viral/genetics
Genome, Viral/immunology
Mice
Pregnancy
Rift Valley Fever/virology
Rift Valley fever virus/chemistry
Sheep
Sheep, Domestic/immunology
Teratogens
Vaccines, Attenuated/administration & dosage
Vaccines, Attenuated/adverse effects
Vaccines, Attenuated/immunology
Viral Vaccines/immunology
Viremia/prevention & control
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Neutralizing); 0 (Antibodies, Viral); 0 (Teratogens); 0 (Vaccines, Attenuated); 0 (Viral Vaccines)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170502
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  2 / 1685 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29514112
[Au] Autor:Dungu B; Lubisi BA; Ikegami T
[Ad] Address:MCI Sante Animale, Mohammedia, Morocco.
[Ti] Title:Rift Valley fever vaccines: current and future needs.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Virol;29:8-15, 2018 Mar 04.
[Is] ISSN:1879-6265
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Rift Valley fever (RVF) is a zoonotic mosquito-borne bunyaviral disease associated with high abortion rates, neonatal deaths, and fetal malformations in ruminants, and mild to severe disease in humans. Outbreaks of RVF cause huge economic losses and public health impacts in endemic countries in Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. A proper vaccination strategy is important for preventing or minimizing outbreaks. Vaccination against RVF is not practiced in many countries, however, due to absence or irregular occurrences of outbreaks, despite serological evidence of RVF viral activity. Nonetheless, effective vaccination strategies, and functional national and international multi-disciplinary networks, remain crucial for ensuring availability of vaccines and supporting execution of vaccination in high risk areas for efficient response to RVF alerts and outbreaks.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 1685 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29363462
[Au] Autor:Subudhi S; Dakouo M; Sloan A; Stein DR; Grolla A; Jones S; Dibernardo A; Rosenke K; Sas M; Traore A; Lindsay R; Groschup MH; Misra V; Feldmann H; Sogoba N; Safronetz D; Niang M
[Ad] Address:University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Seroprevalence of Rift Valley Fever Virus Antibodies in Cattle in Mali, 2005-2014.
[So] Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg;98(3):872-874, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1476-1645
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) outbreaks have considerable impact on human and animal health. Here, we are reporting a serosurvey of cattle from all regions of Mali. These demonstrated that few had been exposed to RVFV from 2005 to 2014. Recent outbreaks of RVF in Niger and a single human case in Mali provide justification for further entomological and ecological studies of this virus.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4269/ajtmh.17-0841

  4 / 1685 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505579
[Au] Autor:de St Maurice A; Nyakarahuka L; Purpura L; Ervin E; Tumusiime A; Balinandi S; Kyondo J; Mulei S; Tusiime P; Manning C; Rollin PE; Knust B; Shoemaker T
[Ad] Address:Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of High Consequence Pathogens and Pathology, Viral Special Pathogens Branch, Atlanta, GA United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Rift Valley Fever: A survey of knowledge, attitudes, and practice of slaughterhouse workers and community members in Kabale District, Uganda.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(3):e0006175, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Rift Valley Fever virus (RVF) is a zoonotic virus in the Phenuiviridae family. RVF outbreaks can cause significant morbidity and mortality in humans and animals. Following the diagnosis of two RVF cases in March 2016 in southern Kabale district, Uganda, we conducted a knowledge, attitudes and practice (KAP) survey to identify knowledge gaps and at-risk behaviors related to RVF. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A multidisciplinary team interviewed 657 community members, including abattoir workers, in and around Kabale District, Uganda. Most participants (90%) had knowledge of RVF and most (77%) cited radio as their primary information source. Greater proportions of farmers (68%), herdsmen (79%) and butchers (88%) thought they were at risk of contracting RVF compared to persons in other occupations (60%, p<0.01). Participants most frequently identified bleeding as a symptom of RVF. Less than half of all participants reported fever, vomiting, and diarrhea as common RVF symptoms in either humans or animals. The level of knowledge about human RVF symptoms did not vary by occupation; however more farmers and butchers (36% and 51%, respectively) had knowledge of RVF symptoms in animals compared to those in other occupations (30%, p<0.01). The use of personal protective equipment (PPE) when handling animals varied by occupation, with 77% of butchers using some PPE and 12% of farmers using PPE. Although most butchers said that they used PPE, most used gumboots (73%) and aprons (60%) and less than 20% of butchers used gloves or eye protection when slaughtering. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, knowledge, attitudes and practice regarding RVF in Kabale District Uganda could be improved through educational efforts targeting specific populations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006175

  5 / 1685 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29408900
[Au] Autor:de la Fuente C; Pinkham C; Dabbagh D; Beitzel B; Garrison A; Palacios G; Hodge KA; Petricoin EF; Schmaljohn C; Campbell CE; Narayanan A; Kehn-Hall K
[Ad] Address:National Center for Biodefense and Infectious Diseases, School of Systems Biology, George Mason University, Manassas, Virginia, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Phosphoproteomic analysis reveals Smad protein family activation following Rift Valley fever virus infection.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0191983, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Rift Valley fever virus (RVFV) infects both ruminants and humans leading to a wide variance of pathologies dependent on host background and age. Utilizing a targeted reverse phase protein array (RPPA) to define changes in signaling cascades after in vitro infection of human cells with virulent and attenuated RVFV strains, we observed high phosphorylation of Smad transcription factors. This evolutionarily conserved family is phosphorylated by and transduces the activation of TGF-ß superfamily receptors. Moreover, we observed that phosphorylation of Smad proteins required active RVFV replication and loss of NSs impaired this activation, further corroborating the RPPA results. Gene promoter analysis of transcripts altered after RVFV infection identified 913 genes that contained a Smad-response element. Functional annotation of these potential Smad-regulated genes clustered in axonal guidance, hepatic fibrosis and cell signaling pathways involved in cellular adhesion/migration, calcium influx, and cytoskeletal reorganization. Furthermore, chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed the presence of a Smad complex on the interleukin 1 receptor type 2 (IL1R2) promoter, which acts as a decoy receptor for IL-1 activation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191983

  6 / 1685 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29462214
[Au] Autor:Brand RF; Rostal MK; Kemp A; Anyamba A; Zwiegers H; Van Huyssteen CW; Karesh WB; Paweska JT
[Ad] Address:Cuyahoga County Board of Health, Parma, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:A phytosociological analysis and description of wetland vegetation and ecological factors associated with locations of high mortality for the 2010-11 Rift Valley fever outbreak in South Africa.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0191585, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Rift Valley fever (RVF) is endemic in Africa and parts of the Middle East. It is an emerging zoonotic disease threat to veterinary and public health. Outbreaks of the disease have severe socio-economic impacts. RVF virus emergence is closely associated with specific endorheic wetlands that are utilized by the virus' mosquito vectors. Limited botanical vegetation surveys had been published with regard to RVF virus (RVFV) ecology. We report on a phytosociological classification, analysis and description of wetland vegetation and related abiotic parameters to elucidate factors possibly associated with the 2010-2011 RVFV disease outbreak in South Africa. The study sites were located in the western Free State and adjacent Northern Cape covering an area of ~40,000 km2 with wetlands associated with high RVF mortality rates in livestock. Other study sites included areas where no RVF activity was reported during the 2010-11 RVF outbreak. A total of 129 plots (30 m2) were selected where a visible difference could be seen in the wetland and upland vegetation. The Braun-Blanquet method was used for plant sampling. Classification was done using modified Two-Way Indicator Species Analysis. The vegetation analysis resulted in the identification of eight plant communities, seven sub-communities and two variants. Indirect ordination was carried out using CANOCO to investigate the relationship between species and wetland ecology. The study also identified 5 categories of wetlands including anthropogenic wetlands. Locations of reported RVF cases overlapped sites characterized by high clay-content soils and specific wetland vegetation. These findings indicate ecological and environmental parameters that represent preferred breeding habitat for RVFV competent mosquito vectors.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191585

  7 / 1685 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29462150
[Au] Autor:Nyasembe VO; Tchouassi DP; Pirk CWW; Sole CL; Torto B
[Ad] Address:International Centre of Insect Physiology and Ecology, Nairobi, Kenya.
[Ti] Title:Host plant forensics and olfactory-based detection in Afro-tropical mosquito disease vectors.
[So] Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis;12(2):e0006185, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1935-2735
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The global spread of vector-borne diseases remains a worrying public health threat, raising the need for development of new combat strategies for vector control. Knowledge of vector ecology can be exploited in this regard, including plant feeding; a critical resource that mosquitoes of both sexes rely on for survival and other metabolic processes. However, the identity of plant species mosquitoes feed on in nature remains largely unknown. By testing the hypothesis about selectivity in plant feeding, we employed a DNA-based approach targeting trnH-psbA and matK genes and identified host plants of field-collected Afro-tropical mosquito vectors of dengue, Rift Valley fever and malaria being among the most important mosquito-borne diseases in East Africa. These included three plant species for Aedes aegypti (dengue), two for both Aedes mcintoshi and Aedes ochraceus (Rift Valley fever) and five for Anopheles gambiae (malaria). Since plant feeding is mediated by olfactory cues, we further sought to identify specific odor signatures that may modulate host plant location. Using coupled gas chromatography (GC)-electroantennographic detection, GC/mass spectrometry and electroantennogram analyses, we identified a total of 21 antennally-active components variably detected by Ae. aegypti, Ae. mcintoshi and An. gambiae from their respective host plants. Whereas Ae. aegypti predominantly detected benzenoids, Ae. mcintoshi detected mainly aldehydes while An. gambiae detected sesquiterpenes and alkenes. Interestingly, the monoterpenes ß-myrcene and (E)-ß-ocimene were consistently detected by all the mosquito species and present in all the identified host plants, suggesting that they may serve as signature cues in plant location. This study highlights the utility of molecular approaches in identifying specific vector-plant associations, which can be exploited in maximizing control strategies such as such as attractive toxic sugar bait and odor-bait technology.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pntd.0006185

  8 / 1685 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29216533
[Au] Autor:Venter M
[Ad] Address:Zoonotic Arbo- and Respiratory Virus Program, Department Medical Virology, Faculty of Health, University of Pretoria, South Africa. Electronic address: Marietjie.venter@up.ac.za.
[Ti] Title:Assessing the zoonotic potential of arboviruses of African origin.
[So] Source:Curr Opin Virol;28:74-84, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1879-6265
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Several African arboviruses have emerged over the past decade in new regions where they caused major outbreaks in humans and/or animals including West Nile virus, Chikungunya virus and Zika virus. This raise questions regarding the importance of less known zoonotic arboviruses in local epidemics in Africa and their potential to emerge internationally. Syndromic surveillance in animals may serve as an early warning system to detect zoonotic arbovirus outbreaks. Rift Valley fever and Wesselsbronvirus are for example associated with abortion storms in livestock while West Nile-virus, Shuni virus and Middelburg virus causes neurological disease outbreaks in horses and other animals. Death in birds may signal Bagaza virus and Usutu virus outbreaks. This short review summarise data on less known arboviruses with zoonotic potential in Africa.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 1685 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29196275
[Au] Autor:Leta S; Beyene TJ; De Clercq EM; Amenu K; Kraemer MUG; Revie CW
[Ad] Address:Addis Ababa University, College of Veterinary Medicine, PO Box 34, Bishoftu, Ethiopia. Electronic address: samson.leta@aau.edu.et.
[Ti] Title:Global risk mapping for major diseases transmitted by Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus.
[So] Source:Int J Infect Dis;67:25-35, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3511
[Cp] Country of publication:Canada
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to map the global risk of the major arboviral diseases transmitted by Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus by identifying areas where the diseases are reported, either through active transmission or travel-related outbreaks, as well as areas where the diseases are not currently reported but are nonetheless suitable for the vector. METHODS: Data relating to five arboviral diseases (Zika, dengue fever, chikungunya, yellow fever, and Rift Valley fever (RVF)) were extracted from some of the largest contemporary databases and paired with data on the known distribution of their vectors, A. aegypti and A. albopictus. The disease occurrence data for the selected diseases were compiled from literature dating as far back as 1952 to as recent as 2017. The resulting datasets were aggregated at the country level, except in the case of the USA, where state-level data were used. Spatial analysis was used to process the data and to develop risk maps. RESULTS: Out of the 250 countries/territories considered, 215 (86%) are potentially suitable for the survival and establishment of A. aegypti and/or A. albopictus. A. albopictus has suitability foci in 197 countries/territories, while there are 188 that are suitable for A. aegypti. There is considerable variation in the suitability range among countries/territories, but many of the tropical regions of the world provide high suitability over extensive areas. Globally, 146 (58.4%) countries/territories reported at least one arboviral disease, while 123 (49.2%) reported more than one of the above diseases. The overall numbers of countries/territories reporting autochthonous vector-borne occurrences of Zika, dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever, and RVF, were 85, 111, 106, 43, and 39, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: With 215 countries/territories potentially suitable for the most important arboviral disease vectors and more than half of these reporting cases, arboviral diseases are indeed a global public health threat. The increasing proportion of reports that include multiple arboviral diseases highlights the expanding range of their common transmission vectors. The shared features of these arboviral diseases should motivate efforts to combine interventions against these diseases.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 1685 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29367607
[Au] Autor:Halldorsson S; Li S; Li M; Harlos K; Bowden TA; Huiskonen JT
[Ad] Address:Division of Structural Biology, Wellcome Centre for Human Genetics, University of Oxford, Roosevelt Drive, Oxford, OX3 7BN, UK.
[Ti] Title:Shielding and activation of a viral membrane fusion protein.
[So] Source:Nat Commun;9(1):349, 2018 01 24.
[Is] ISSN:2041-1723
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Entry of enveloped viruses relies on insertion of hydrophobic residues of the viral fusion protein into the host cell membrane. However, the intermediate conformations during fusion remain unknown. Here, we address the fusion mechanism of Rift Valley fever virus. We determine the crystal structure of the Gn glycoprotein and fit it with the Gc fusion protein into cryo-electron microscopy reconstructions of the virion. Our analysis reveals how the Gn shields the hydrophobic fusion loops of the Gc, preventing premature fusion. Electron cryotomography of virions interacting with membranes under acidic conditions reveals how the fusogenic Gc is activated upon removal of the Gn shield. Repositioning of the Gn allows extension of Gc and insertion of fusion loops in the outer leaflet of the target membrane. These data show early structural transitions that enveloped viruses undergo during host cell entry and indicate that analogous shielding mechanisms are utilized across diverse virus families.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41467-017-02789-2


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