Database : MEDLINE
Search on : salmonella and infections [Words]
References found : 30766 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 3077 go to page                         

  1 / 30766 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29377961
[Au] Autor:DeBerg HA; Zaidi MB; Altman MC; Khaenam P; Gersuk VH; Campos FD; Perez-Martinez I; Meza-Segura M; Chaussabel D; Banchereau J; Estrada-Garcia T; Linsley PS
[Ad] Address:Benaroya Research Institute at Virginia Mason, Seattle, Washington, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Shared and organism-specific host responses to childhood diarrheal diseases revealed by whole blood transcript profiling.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0192082, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Globally, diarrheal diseases are a leading cause of death in children under five and disproportionately affect children in developing countries. Children who contract diarrheal diseases are rarely screened to identify the etiologic agent due to time and cost considerations associated with pathogen-specific screening and hence pathogen-directed therapy is uncommon. The development of biomarkers to rapidly identify underlying pathogens could improve treatment options and clinical outcomes in childhood diarrheal diseases. Here, we perform RNA sequencing on blood samples collected from children evaluated in an emergency room setting with diarrheal disease where the pathogen(s) present are known. We determine host response gene signatures specific to Salmonella, Shigella and rotavirus, but not E. coli, infections that distinguish them from each other and from healthy controls. Specifically, we observed differential expression of genes related to chemokine receptors or inflammasome signaling in Shigella cases, such as CCR3, CXCR8, and NLRC4, and interferon response genes, such as IFI44 and OASL, in rotavirus cases. Our findings add insight into the host peripheral immune response to these pathogens, and suggest strategies and limitations for the use host response transcript signatures for diagnosing the etiologic agent of childhood diarrheal diseases.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diarrhea/immunology
Gene Expression Profiling
RNA, Messenger/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Child
Diarrhea/blood
Diarrhea/genetics
Gastrointestinal Diseases/genetics
Gastrointestinal Diseases/microbiology
Humans
Rotavirus/isolation & purification
Shigella/isolation & purification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (RNA, Messenger)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192082

  2 / 30766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29522200
[Au] Autor:Gambino-Shirley KJ; Tesfai A; Schwensohn CA; Burnett C; Smith L; Wagner JM; Eikmeier D; Smith K; Stone JP; Updike D; Hines J; Shade LN; Tolar B; Fu TJ; Viazis S; Seelman SL; Blackshear K; Wise ME; Neil KP
[Ad] Address:Epidemic Intelligence Service Program, Atlanta GA.
[Ti] Title:Multistate Outbreak of Salmonella Virchow Infections Linked to a Powdered Meal Replacement Product - United States, 2015-2016.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Nontyphoidal Salmonella is the leading cause of bacterial gastroenteritis in the United States. Meal replacement products containing raw and 'superfood' ingredients have gained increasing popularity among consumers in recent years. In January 2016, we investigated a multistate outbreak of infections with a novel strain of Salmonella Virchow. Methods: Cases were defined using molecular subtyping procedures. Commonly reported exposures were compared with responses from healthy people interviewed in the 2006-2007 FoodNet Population Survey. Firm inspections and product traceback and testing were performed. Results: Thirty-five cases from 24 states were identified; 6 hospitalizations and no deaths were reported. Thirty-one (94%) of 33 ill people interviewed reported consuming a powdered supplement in the week before illness; of these, 30 (97%) reported consuming Product A, a raw organic powdered shake product consumed as a meal replacement. Laboratory testing isolated the outbreak strain of Salmonella Virchow from: leftover Product A collected from ill people's homes, organic moringa leaf powder (an ingredient in Product A), and finished product retained by the firm. Firm inspections at three facilities linked to Product A production did not reveal contamination at the facilities. Traceback identified that the contaminated moringa leaf powder was imported from South Africa. Conclusions: This investigation identified a novel outbreak vehicle and highlighted the potential risk with similar products not intended to be cooked by consumers before consuming. The company issued a voluntary recall of all implicated products. As this product has a long shelf-life, the recall likely prevented additional illnesses.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/ciy195

  3 / 30766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29518166
[Au] Autor:Kuijpers LMF; Chung P; Peeters M; Phoba MF; Kham C; Barbé B; Lunguya O; Jacobs J
[Ad] Address:Institute of Tropical Medicine, Department of Clinical Sciences, Antwerp, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Diagnostic accuracy of antigen-based immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic tests for the detection of Salmonella in blood culture broth.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(3):e0194024, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In low resource settings, Salmonella serovars frequently cause bloodstream infections. This study investigated the diagnostic performance of immunochromatographic rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs), which detect Salmonella antigens, when applied to stored grown blood culture broth. MATERIAL/METHODS: The SD Bioline One Step Salmonella Typhi Ag Rapid Detection Kit (Standard Diagnostics, Republic of Korea), marketed for the detection of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (Salmonella Typhi) in stool and the Salmonella Ag Rapid Test (Creative Diagnostics, USA), marketed for the detection of all Salmonella serotypes in stool, were selected for evaluation based on a pre-test evaluation of six RDT products. The limits of detection (LOD) for culture suspensions were established and the selected RDT products were assessed on 19 freshly grown spiked blood culture broth samples and 413 stored clinical blood culture broth samples, collected in Cambodia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. RESULTS: The LOD of both products was established as 107-108 CFU/ml. When applied to clinical blood culture broth samples, the diagnostic sensitivity and specificity of the SD Bioline RDT were respectively 100% and 79.7% for the detection of Salmonella Typhi; 94.4% (65/69) of false-positive results were caused by Salmonella Enteritidis. When considering the combined detection of Salmonella Typhi and Enteritidis (both group D Salmonella), sensitivity and specificity were 97.9% and 98.5% respectively. For Creative Diagnostics, diagnostic sensitivity was 78.3% and specificity 91.0% for all Salmonella serotypes combined; 88.3% (53/60) of false negative results were caused by Salmonella Paratyphi A. CONCLUSIONS: When applied to grown blood culture broths, the SD Bioline RDT had a good sensitivity and specificity for the detection of Salmonella Typhi and Salmonella Enteritidis. The Creative Diagnostics product had a moderate sensitivity and acceptable specificity for the detection of all Salmonella serovars combined and needs further optimization. A RDT that reliably detects Salmonella Paratyphi A is needed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0194024

  4 / 30766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29408951
[Au] Autor:Hogan B; Eibach D; Krumkamp R; Sarpong N; Dekker D; Kreuels B; Maiga-Ascofaré O; Gyau Boahen K; Wiafe Akenten C; Adu-Sarkodie Y; Owusu-Dabo E; May J; Fever Without Source (FWS) Study Group
[Ad] Address:Department of Infectious Disease Epidemiology, Bernhard Nocht Institute for Tropical Medicine Hamburg, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Malaria Coinfections in Febrile Pediatric Inpatients: A Hospital-Based Study From Ghana.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: The epidemiology of pediatric febrile illness is shifting in sub-Saharan Africa, but malaria remains a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality. The present study describes causes of febrile illness in hospitalized children in Ghana and aims to determine the burden of malaria coinfections and their association with parasite densities. Methods: In a prospective study, children (aged ≥30 days and ≤15 years) with fever ≥38.0°C were recruited after admission to the pediatric ward of a primary hospital in Ghana. Malaria parasitemia was determined and blood, stool, urine, respiratory, and cerebrospinal fluid specimens were screened for parasitic, bacterial, and viral pathogens. Associations of Plasmodium densities with other pathogens were calculated. Results: From November 2013 to April 2015, 1238 children were enrolled from 4169 admissions. A clinical/microbiological diagnosis could be made in 1109/1238 (90%) patients, with Plasmodium parasitemia (n = 728/1238 [59%]) being predominant. This was followed by lower respiratory tract infections/pneumonia (n = 411/1238 [34%]; among detected pathogens most frequently Streptococcus pneumoniae, n = 192/299 [64%]), urinary tract infections (n = 218/1238 [18%]; Escherichia coli, n = 21/32 [66%]), gastrointestinal infections (n = 210 [17%]; rotavirus, n = 32/97 [33%]), and invasive bloodstream infections (n = 62 [5%]; Salmonella species, n = 47 [76%]). In Plasmodium-infected children the frequency of lower respiratory tract, gastrointestinal, and bloodstream infections increased with decreasing parasite densities. Conclusions: In a hospital setting, the likelihood of comorbidity with a nonmalarial disease is inversely correlated with increasing blood levels of malaria parasites. Hence, parasite densities provide important information as an indicator for the probability of coinfection, in particular to guide antimicrobial medication.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/cix1120

  5 / 30766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29351594
[Au] Autor:Voysey M; Pollard AJ
[Ad] Address:Nuffield Department of Primary Care Health Sciences, University of Oxford, Oxford, UK.
[Ti] Title:Sero-efficacy of Vi-polysaccharide tetanus-toxoid typhoid conjugate vaccine (Typbar-TCV).
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2018 Jan 17.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Salmonella Typhi is the major cause of enteric fever in lower income countries. New conjugate vaccines show promise as public health interventions, however there are no efficacy data available from endemic areas. Methods: Data were obtained from a previously published phase 3 randomised controlled trial comparing Vi-polysaccharide tetanus-toxoid conjugate vaccine (Typbar-TCV; Bharat Biotech Intl Ltd, India): (Vi-TT) with Vi-polysaccharide (Typbar; Bharat Biotech Intl Ltd, India): (Vi-PS) in participants aged 2- 45 years. An additional open-label arm administered Vi-TT to children aged 6 months to 23 months. The proportion of participants with presumed clinical or subclinical infection ('seroincidence'), was determined using mixture models and compared using relative risks. Results: 81/387 (21%) participants were classified as having presumed typhoid infection during the 2 year period post-vaccination. Seroincidence was lower in those randomised to Vi-TT than Vi-PS in those aged 2-45 years; 21/155 (13.5%) vs 47/129 (36.4%); RR 0.372 (95%CI 0.235-0.588), p<0.0001 and in those aged 2-15 years RR 0.424 (95%CI 0.231-0.778), p=0.0039. There was no difference in seroincidence in those receiving Vi-TT aged 2-45 years and those aged 6-23 months; 21/155 (13.5%) vs 13/103 (12.6%); RR 1.073 (0.563, 2.046), p=0.8293. Vaccine seroefficacy was 85% (95%CI 80-88%). Conclusion: This is the first field estimate of the seroefficacy of a Vi-TT vaccine and shows that Typbar TCV substantially reduces the number of serologically defined (sub)clinical infections in infants, children and adults. These results support the recent World Health Organisation recommendations for deployment of typhoid conjugate vaccines in high burden areas.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/cix1145

  6 / 30766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29349940
[Au] Autor:Rhie K; Choi EH; Cho EY; Lee J; Kang JH; Kim DS; Kim YJ; Ahn Y; Eun BW; Oh SH; Cha SH; Hong YJ; Kim KN; Kim NH; Kim YK; Kim JH; Lee T; Kim HM; Lee KS; Kim CS; Park SE; Kim YM; Oh CE; Ma SH; Jo DS; Choi YY; Lee HJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, Seoul National University Children's Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Etiology of Invasive Bacterial Infections in Immunocompetent Children in Korea (2006-2010): a Retrospective Multicenter Study.
[So] Source:J Korean Med Sci;33(6):e45, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1598-6357
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Invasive bacterial infections in apparently immunocompetent children were retrospectively analyzed to figure causative bacterial organisms in Korea. METHODS: A total of 947 cases from 25 university hospitals were identified from 2006 to 2010 as a continuance of a previous 10-year period study from 1996 to 2005. RESULTS: Escherichia coli (41.3%), Streptococcus agalactiae (27.7%), and Staphylococcus aureus (27.1%) were the most common pathogens in infants < 3 months of age. S. agalactiae was the most prevalent cause of meningitis and pneumonia and E. coli was the major cause of bacteremia without localizing signs in this group. In children 3 to 59 months of age, Streptococcus pneumoniae (54.2%), S. aureus (20.5%), and Salmonella spp. (14.4%) were the most common pathogens. S. pneumoniae was the leading cause of pneumonia (86.0%), meningitis (65.0%), and bacteremia without localizing signs (49.0%) in this group. In children ≥ 5 years of age, S. aureus (62.8%) was the predominant pathogen, followed by Salmonella species (12.4%) and S. pneumoniae (11.5%). Salmonella species (43.0%) was the most common cause of bacteremia without localizing signs in this group. The relative proportion of S. aureus increased significantly over the 15-year period (1996-2010) in children ≥ 3 months of age (P < 0.001), while that of Haemophilus influenzae decreased significantly in both < 3 months of age group (P = 0.036) and ≥ 3 months of age groups (P < 0.001). CONCLUSION: S. agalactiae, E. coli, S. pneumoniae, and S. aureus are common etiologic agents of invasive bacterial infections in Korean children.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3346/jkms.2018.33.e45

  7 / 30766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29342283
[Au] Autor:Le Thi Phuong T; Rattanavong S; Vongsouvath M; Davong V; Phu Huong Lan N; Campbell JI; Darton TC; Thwaites GE; Newton PN; Dance DAB; Baker S
[Ad] Address:Hospital for Tropical Diseases, Wellcome Trust Major Overseas Programme, Oxford University Clinical Research Unit, 764 Vo Van Kiet, Quan 5, Ho Chi Minh City, Vietnam.
[Ti] Title:Non-typhoidal Salmonella serovars associated with invasive and non-invasive disease in the Lao People's Democratic Republic.
[So] Source:Trans R Soc Trop Med Hyg;111(9):418-424, 2017 Sep 01.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3503
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Invasive non-typhoidal Salmonella (iNTS) disease is a well-described cause of mortality in children and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults in sub-Saharan Africa. Additionally, there is an ill-defined burden of iNTS disease in Southeast Asia. Methods: Aiming to investigate the causative serovars of non-invasive and iNTS disease and their associated antimicrobial susceptibility profiles in the Lao People's Democratic Republic, we performed multilocus sequence typing and antimicrobial susceptibility profiling on 168 NTS (63 blood and 105 faecal) organisms isolated in Lao between 2000 and 2012. Results: Six different serovars were isolated from blood; Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis (n=28), S. enterica serovar Typhimurium (n=19) and S. enterica serovar Choleraesuis (n=11) accounted for >90% (58/63) of the iNTS disease cases. In contrast, the isolates from diarrhoeal faeces were comprised of 18 different serovars, the mostly commonly identified being S. enterica Typhimurium (n=28), S. enterica Weltevreden (n=14) and S. enterica Stanley (n=15). S. enterica Enteritidis and S. enterica Choleraesuis were significantly more associated with systemic disease than diarrhoeal disease in this patient group (p<0.001). Conclusions: We find a differing distribution of Salmonella sequence types/serovars between those causing iNTS disease and non-invasive disease in Lao. We conclude that there is a small but not insignificant burden of iNTS disease in Lao. Further clinical and epidemiological investigations are required to assess mortality and the role of comorbidities such as HIV.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/trstmh/trx076

  8 / 30766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29293941
[Au] Autor:Imdad A; Retzer F; Thomas LS; McMillian M; Garman K; Rebeiro PF; Deppen SA; Dunn JR; Woron AM
[Ad] Address:D. Brent Polk Division of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN.
[Ti] Title:Impact of Culture-Independent Diagnostic Testing on Recovery of Enteric Bacterial Infections.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2017 Dec 26.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Culture-independent diagnostic tests (CIDT) are increasingly used to identify enteric pathogens. However, foodborne illness surveillance systems have relied upon culture confirmation to estimate disease burden and identify outbreaks through molecular subtyping. This study examined the impacts of CIDT and estimated costs for culture verification of Shigella, Salmonella, Shiga-Toxin producing E. coli (STEC), and Campylobacter at the Tennessee Department of Health Public Health Laboratory (PHL). Methods: This observational study included laboratory and epidemiological surveillance data collected between years 2013-2016 from patients with the reported enteric illness. We calculated pathogen recovery at PHL based on initial diagnostic test type reported at the clinical laboratory. Adjusted prevalence ratios (PR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated with Modified Poisson Regression. Estimates of cost were calculated for pathogen recovery from CIDT positive specimens compared to recovery from culture-derived isolates. Results: During the study period, PHL received 5553 specimens from clinical laboratories from patients with the enteric illness. Pathogen recovery was 57% (984/1713) from referred CIDT positive stool specimens and 95% (3662/3840) from culture-derived isolates (PR=0.61, 95% CI: 0.56-0.66). Pathogen recovery from CIDT-positive specimens varied based on pathogen type: Salmonella (72%), Shigella (64%), STEC (57%) and Campylobacter (26%). Compared to stool culture-derived isolates, the cost to recover pathogens from 100 CIDT positive specimens was higher for Shigella ($6,192), Salmonella ($18,373) and STEC ($27,783). Conclusions: Pathogen recovery was low from CIDT positive specimens for enteric bacteria. This has important implications for the current enteric disease surveillance system, outbreak detection and costs for public health programs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/cix1128

  9 / 30766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29512397
[Au] Autor:Wipasa J; Chaiwarith R; Chawansuntati K; Praparattanapan J; Rattanathammethee K; Supparatpinyo K
[Ad] Address:1 Research Institute for Health Sciences, 26682 Chiang Mai University , Chiang Mai 50202, Thailand.
[Ti] Title:Characterization of anti-interferon-γ antibodies in HIV-negative immunodeficient patients infected with unusual intracellular microorganisms.
[So] Source:Exp Biol Med (Maywood);:1535370218764086, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1535-3699
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A major characteristic of immunodeficiency associated with life-threatening intracellular infection in adults is the presence of anti-interferon-γ antibodies. Although little is known about the mechanism underlying this syndrome, it is believed that the antibodies inhibit the activity of downstream signaling pathway of interferon-γ. In this study, the characteristics of these antibodies in patients who presented, or have a history of, intracellular infection and were positive to anti-interferon-γ antibodies were investigated. The antibodies exhibited mainly the IgG1 and the IgG4 subtypes and recognized the C-terminal of the interferon-γ linear epitope containing the KRKR motif, which is required for the biological activity of interferon-γ. The antibodies bound to recombinant interferon-γ with significantly lower avidity than antibodies to a recall antigen, tetanus toxoid, suggesting that the antibodies might have not undergone affinity maturation. The data from this study may provide fundamental information to better understand the properties of anti-interferon-γ antibodies, which can be useful for future studies. Impact statement An increase in the number of immunodeficient patients related to autoantibodies to interferon (IFN)-γ has been observed particularly in East Asian adults. These patients are often presented with opportunistic infections caused by intracellular pathogens, including non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), Cryptococcus neoformans, Penicillium marneffei (now called Talaromyces marneffei), and non-typhoidal Salmonella spp. The mortality rate for this syndrome is relatively high with 32% patients dying at the median time of 25 months after diagnosis. Characterization of these autoantibodies may promote better understanding of the syndrome, an emerging health problem affecting East Asia populations and impeding their welfare and economic development.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/1535370218764086

  10 / 30766 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29511082
[Au] Autor:Schager AE; Dominguez-Medina CC; Necchi F; Micoli F; Goh YS; Goodall M; Flores-Langarica A; Bobat S; Cook CNL; Arcuri M; Marini A; King LDW; Morris FC; Anderson G; Toellner KM; Henderson IR; López-Macías C; MacLennan CA; Cunningham AF
[Ad] Address:Institute for Microbiology and Infection, School of Immunology and Immunotherapy, Institute for Biomedical Research, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:IgG Responses to Porins and Lipopolysaccharide within an Outer Membrane-Based Vaccine against Nontyphoidal Develop at Discordant Rates.
[So] Source:MBio;9(2), 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:2150-7511
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Antibodies acquired after vaccination or natural infection with Gram-negative bacteria, such as invasive serovar Typhimurium, can protect against disease. Immunization with naturally shed outer membrane vesicles from Gram-negative bacteria is being studied for its potential to protect against many infections, since antigens within vesicles maintain their natural conformation and orientation. Shedding can be enhanced through genetic modification, and the resulting particles, generalized modules for membrane antigens (GMMA), not only offer potential as vaccines but also can facilitate the study of B-cell responses to bacterial antigens. Here we show that the response to immunization with GMMA from  Typhimurium (STmGMMA) provides B-cell-dependent protection and induces antibodies to two immunodominant antigens, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and porins. Antibodies to LPS O antigen (O-Ag) markedly enhance protection in the spleen, but this effect is less marked in the liver. Strikingly, IgG responses to LPS and porins develop with distinct kinetics. In the first week after immunization, there is a dramatic T-cell-independent B1b-cell-associated induction of all IgG isotypes, except IgG1, to porins but not to LPS. In contrast, production of IgG1 to either antigen was delayed and T cell dependent. Nevertheless, after 1 month, cells in the bone marrow secreting IgG against porins or LPS were present at a similar frequency. Unexpectedly, immunization with O-Ag-deficient STmGMMA did not substantially enhance the anti-porin response. Therefore, IgG switching to all antigens does not develop synchronously within the same complex and so the rate of IgG switching to a single component does not necessarily reflect its frequency within the antigenic complex. Vaccines save millions of lives, yet for some infections there are none. This includes some types of infections, killing hundreds of thousands of people annually. We show how a new type of vaccine, called GMMA, that is made from blebs shed from the cell wall, works to protect against infection in mice by inducing host proteins (antibodies) specifically recognizing bacterial components (antigens). The rate of development of IgG antibody to antigens within GMMA occurred with different kinetics. However, the antibody response to GMMA persists and is likely to provide prolonged protection for those who need it. These results help show how antibody responses to bacterial antigens develop and how vaccines like GMMA can work and help prevent infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


page 1 of 3077 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information