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[PMID]: 29274739
[Au] Autor:Martin MD; Quiroz-Claros E; Brush GS; Zimmer EA
[Ad] Address:Department of Natural History, NTNU University Museum, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway; Department of Geography and Environmental Engineering, Johns Hopkins University, 313 Ames Hall, 3400 North Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA. Electronic add
[Ti] Title:Herbarium collection-based phylogenetics of the ragweeds (Ambrosia, Asteraceae).
[So] Source:Mol Phylogenet Evol;120:335-341, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1095-9513
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ambrosia (Asteraceae) is a taxonomically difficult genus of weedy, wind-pollinated plants with an apparent center of diversity in the Sonoran Desert of North America. Determining Ambrosia's evolutionary relationships has been the subject of much interest, with numerous studies using morphological characters, cytology, comparative phytochemistry, and chloroplast restriction site variation to produce conflicting accounts the relationships between Ambrosia species, as well as the classification of their close relatives in Franseria and Hymenoclea. To resolve undetermined intra-generic relationships within Ambrosia, we used DNA extracted from tissues obtained from seed banks and herbarium collections to generate multi-locus genetic data representing nearly all putative species, including four from South America. We performed Bayesian and Maximum-Likelihood phylogenetic analyses of six chloroplast-genome and two nuclear-genome markers, enabling us to infer monophyly for the genus, resolve major infra-generic species clusters, as well as to resolve open questions about the evolutionary relationships of several Ambrosia species and former members of Franseria. We also provide molecular data supporting the hypothesis that A. sandersonii formed through the hybridization of A. eriocentra and A. salsola. The topology of our chloroplast DNA phylogeny is almost entirely congruent with the most recent molecular work based on chloroplast restriction site variation of a much more limited sampling of 14 North American species of Ambrosia, although our improved sampling of global Ambrosia diversity enables us to draw additional conclusions. As our study is the first direct DNA sequence-based phylogenetic analyses of Ambrosia, we analyze the data in relation to previous taxonomic studies and discuss several instances of chloroplast/nuclear incongruence that leave the precise geographic center of origin of Ambrosia in question.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

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[PMID]: 28743765
[Au] Autor:Kurmanbayeva A; Bekturova A; Srivastava S; Soltabayeva A; Asatryan A; Ventura Y; Khan MS; Salazar O; Fedoroff N; Sagi M
[Ad] Address:Plant Stress Laboratory, French Associates Institute for Agriculture and Biotechnology of Drylands, Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, 84990, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Higher Novel L-Cys Degradation Activity Results in Lower Organic-S and Biomass in than the Related Saltwort, .
[So] Source:Plant Physiol;175(1):272-289, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2548
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:and are almost identical halophytes whose edible succulent shoots hold promise for commercial production in saline water. Enhanced sulfur nutrition may be beneficial to crops naturally grown on high sulfate. However, little is known about sulfate nutrition in halophytes. Here we show that (ecotype RN) exhibits a significant increase in biomass and organic-S accumulation in response to supplemental sulfate, whereas (ecotype VM) does not, instead exhibiting increased sulfate accumulation. We investigated the role of two pathways on organic-S and biomass accumulation in and : the sulfate reductive pathway that generates Cys and l-Cys desulfhydrase that degrades Cys to H S, NH , and pyruvate. The major function of -acetyl-Ser-(thiol) lyase (OAS-TL; EC 2.5.1.47) is the formation of l-Cys, but our study shows that the OAS-TL A and OAS-TL B of both halophytes are enzymes that also degrade l-Cys to H S. This activity was significantly higher in than in , especially upon sulfate supplementation. The activity of the sulfate reductive pathway key enzyme, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase (APR, EC 1.8.99.2), was significantly higher in than in These results suggest that the low organic-S level in is the result of high l-Cys degradation rate by OAS-TLs, whereas the greater organic-S and biomass accumulation in is the result of higher APR activity and low l-Cys degradation rate, resulting in higher net Cys biosynthesis. These results present an initial road map for halophyte growers to attain better growth rates and nutritional value of and .
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Amaranthaceae/metabolism
Chenopodiaceae/metabolism
Cysteine/metabolism
Plant Proteins/metabolism
Salsola/metabolism
Sulfur/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amaranthaceae/drug effects
Biomass
Chenopodiaceae/drug effects
Cysteine Synthase/metabolism
Oxidoreductases Acting on Sulfur Group Donors/metabolism
Salinity
Salsola/drug effects
Salt-Tolerant Plants
Sodium/pharmacology
Sulfates/pharmacology
Sulfhydryl Compounds/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Plant Proteins); 0 (Sulfates); 0 (Sulfhydryl Compounds); 70FD1KFU70 (Sulfur); 9NEZ333N27 (Sodium); EC 1.8.- (Oxidoreductases Acting on Sulfur Group Donors); EC 1.8.99.2 (adenylylsulfate reductase); EC 2.5.1.47 (Cysteine Synthase); K848JZ4886 (Cysteine)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170727
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1104/pp.17.00780

  3 / 179 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29474430
[Au] Autor:Arroyo AI; Pueyo Y; Giner ML; Foronda A; Sanchez-Navarrete P; Saiz H; Alados CL
[Ad] Address:Instituto Pirenaico de Ecología (CSIC), Zaragoza, Spain.
[Ti] Title:Evidence for chemical interference effect of an allelopathic plant on neighboring plant species: A field study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(2):e0193421, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Many studies have reported the phytotoxicity of allelopathic compounds under controlled conditions. However, more field studies are required to provide realistic evidences for the significance of allelopathic interference in natural communities. We conducted a 2-years field experiment in a semiarid plant community (NE Spain). Specifically, we planted juvenile individuals and sowed seeds of Salsola vermiculata L., Lygeum spartum L. and Artemisia herba-alba Asso. (three co-dominant species in the community) beneath adult individuals of the allelopathic shrub A. herba-alba, and assessed the growth, vitality, seed germination and seedling survival of those target species with and without the presence of chemical interference by the incorporation of activated carbon (AC) to the soil. In addition, juveniles and seeds of the same three target species were planted and sown beneath the canopy of adults of S. vermiculata (a shrub similar to A. herba-alba, but non-allelopathic) and in open bare soil to evaluate whether the allelopathic activity of A. herba-alba modulates the net outcome of its interactions with neighboring plants under contrasting abiotic stress conditions. We found that vitality of A. herba-alba juveniles was enhanced beneath A. herba-alba individuals when AC was present. Furthermore, we found that the interaction outcome in A. herba-alba microsite was neutral, whereas a positive outcome was found for S. vermiculata microsite, suggesting that allelopathy may limit the potential facilitative effects of the enhanced microclimatic conditions in A. herba-alba microsite. Yet, L. spartum juveniles were facilitated in A. herba-alba microsite. The interaction outcome in A. herba-alba microsite was positive under conditions of very high abiotic stress, indicating that facilitative interactions predominated over the interference of allelopathic plants under those conditions. These results highlight that laboratory studies can overestimate the significance of allelopathy in nature, and consequently, results obtained under controlled conditions should be interpreted carefully.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180223
[Lr] Last revision date:180223
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0193421

  4 / 179 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29402933
[Au] Autor:Bar-Shmuel N; Rogovin E; Rachmilevitch S; Friedman AL; Shelef O; Hoffmann I; Rosenberg T; Behar A; Shavit R; Meng F; Segoli M
[Ad] Address:Mitrani Department of Desert Ecology, The Swiss Institute for Dryland Environmental and Energy Research, The Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Midreshet Ben-Gurion, Israel.
[Ti] Title:Tripartite symbiosis of plant-weevil-bacteria is a widespread phenomenon in the Negev Desert.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;8(1):2420, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The weevil Conorhynchus palumbus develops in a mud chamber affixed to the roots of the summer annual plant Salsola inermis in the Negev Desert of Israel. The weevil carries nitrogen fixing bacteria, and evidence suggests that plants with weevils utilize the fixed nitrogen. To characterize the distribution, abundance and significance of this unique interaction, we surveyed Salsola plants in 16 sites throughout the Negev Desert. We excavated ~100 plants from each site, recorded the presence of weevils in their roots, and characterized the soil properties in each site. Weevil mud chambers were present in all of the sampled sites and their abundance was positively correlated with soil nitrogen content and with plant size, and negatively correlated with soil grain-size. Intriguingly, we found two additional weevil species-Menecleonus virgatus and Maximus mimosae-residing in mud chambers on Salsola roots, and found one additional Salsola species-S. incanescens-accommodating weevils. Nitrogen fixing bacteria were found in weevil larvae of the two additional species and at multiple sites. Overall, our findings suggest that potentially beneficial associations between weevils and plants may be more common than previously acknowledged, and may play an important role in this desert ecosystem.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/s41598-018-20828-w

  5 / 179 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29319512
[Au] Autor:Mukhtar S; Ishaq A; Hassan S; Mehnaz S; Mirza MS; Malik KA
[Ad] Address:Department of Biological Sciences, Forman Christian College (A Chartered University), Lahore, Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of Microbial Communities Associated with Halophyte (Salsola stocksii) and Non-Halophyte (Triticum aestivum) Using Culture-Independent Approaches.
[So] Source:Pol J Microbiol;66(3):353-364, 2017 Sep 27.
[Is] ISSN:1733-1331
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Halophyte microbiome contributes significantly to plant performance and can provide information regarding complex ecological processes involved in osmoregulation of these plants. The objective of this study is to investigate the microbiomes associated with belowground (rhizosphere), internal (endosphere) and aboveground (phyllosphere) tissues of halophyte (Salsola stocksii) through metagenomics approach. Plant samples were collected from Khewra Salt Mines. The metagenomic DNA from soil, root and shoot samples was isolated with the help of FastDNA spin kit. Through PCR, the 16S rRNA gene from four different Salsola plants and wheat plants was amplified and cloned in InsTAclone PCR cloning kit. Metagenomic analyses from rhizosphere, endosphere and phyllosphere of Salsola showed that approximately 29% bacteria were uncultured and unclassified. Proteobacteria and Actinobacteria were the most abundant phyla in Salsola and wheat. However, Firmicutes, Acidobacteria, Bacteriodetes, Planctomycetes, Cyanobacteria, Thermotogae, Verrucomicrobia, Choroflexi and Euryarchaeota were predominant groups from halophyte whereas Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Cyanobacteria, Acidobacteria, Bacteriodetes, Planctomycetes and Verrucomicrobia were predominant phyla of wheat samples. Diversity and differences of microbial flora of Salsola and wheat suggested that functional interactions between plants and microorganisms contribute to salt stress tolerance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180110
[Lr] Last revision date:180110
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.5604/01.3001.0010.4866

  6 / 179 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29210002
[Au] Autor:Moran PJ; Wibawa MI; Smith L
[Ad] Address:U.S. Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, Exotic and Invasive Weeds Research Unit, 800 Buchanan St., Albany, CA, 94710, USA. Patrick.Moran@ars.usda.gov.
[Ti] Title:Tolerance of the eriophyid mite Aceria salsolae to UV-A light and implications for biological control of Russian thistle.
[So] Source:Exp Appl Acarol;73(3-4):327-338, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1572-9702
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Aceria salsolae (Acari: Eriophyidae) is being evaluated as a candidate biological control agent of Russian thistle (Salsola tragus, Chenopodiaceae), a major invasive weed of rangelands and dryland crops in the western USA. Prior laboratory host range testing under artificial lighting indicated reproduction on non-native Bassia hyssopifolia and on a native plant, Suaeda calceoliformis. However, in field tests in the native range, mite populations released on these 'nontarget' plants remained low. We hypothesized that UV-A light, which can affect behavior of tetranychid mites, would affect populations of the eriophyid A. salsolae differently on the target and nontarget plant species, decreasing the mite's realized host range. Plants were infested with A. salsolae under lamps that emitted UV-A, along with broad-spectrum lighting, and the size of mite populations and plant growth was compared to infested plants exposed only to broad-spectrum light. Russian thistle supported 3- to 55-fold larger mite populations than nontarget plants regardless of UV-A treatment. UV-A exposure did not affect mite populations on Russian thistle or S. calceoliformis, whereas it increased populations 7-fold on B. hyssopifolia. Main stems on nontarget plants grew 2- to 6-fold faster than did Russian thistle under either light treatment. The two nontarget plants attained greater volume under the control light regime than UV-A, but Russian thistle was unaffected. Although Russian thistle was always the superior host, addition of UV-A light to the artificial lighting regime did not reduce the ability of A. salsolae to reproduce on the two nontarget species, suggesting that UV-B or other environmental factors may be more important in limiting mite populations in the field.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171220
[Lr] Last revision date:171220
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s10493-017-0205-z

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[PMID]: 28960180
[Au] Autor:Al-Ahmad M; Rodriguez-Bouza T; Fakim N; Pineda F
[Ad] Address:Microbiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, Kuwait University.
[Ti] Title:Salsola kali cross-reacts extensively with Salsola imbricata.
[So] Source:J Investig Allergol Clin Immunol;:0, 2017 Sep 29.
[Is] ISSN:1018-9068
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: There are no studies on the cross-reactivity between Salsola kali and Salsola imbricata pollens. The main goal is to compare the degree of the cross-reactivity between Salsola kali and Salsola imbricata, and secondly to compare the various common allergen components between Salsola kali and Salsola imbricata. METHODS: Serum from rhinitis patients with or without asthma living in Kuwait presenting with a positive skin test to Salsola kali were obtained. SDS PAGE/IgE Western blot, ELISA inhibition assay was done with patients from Kuwait. RESULTS: 37 patients from Kuwait were recluted. The most frequent IgE reactive proteins against Salsola imbricata were around 12, 15, 18, 37 and 50+55 kDa. 2D electrophoresis displayed a correlation between Salsola kali and Salsola imbricata at 40, 60, 75 KDa with similar isoelectric points. ELISA inhibition presented with an Ag50 value of 1.7 µg/mL for Salsola kali and 500.5 µg/mL for Salsola imbricata when the solid phase was Salsola kali, and an Ag50 value of 1.4 µg/mL for Salsola kali and 3.0 µg/mL for Salsola imbricata when solid phase was Salsola imbricata. CONCLUSIONS: Salsola kali and Salsola imbricata present strong cross-reactivity as observed in ELISA inhibition and this might be clinically relevant for the efficacy of allergen specific immunotherapy. We described, for the first time, the allergenic profile for Salsola imbricata and possible common allergenic proteins for Salsola kali and Salsola imbricata.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170929
[Lr] Last revision date:170929
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.18176/jiaci.0204

  8 / 179 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28502749
[Au] Autor:Mas S; Oeo-Santos C; Cuesta-Herranz J; Díaz-Perales A; Colás C; Fernández J; Barber D; Rodríguez R; de Los Ríos V; Barderas R; Villalba M
[Ad] Address:Dpto. Bioquímica y Biología Molecular I, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Madrid, Spain.
[Ti] Title:A relevant IgE-reactive 28kDa protein identified from Salsola kali pollen extract by proteomics is a natural degradation product of an integral 47kDa polygalaturonase.
[So] Source:Biochim Biophys Acta;1865(8):1067-1076, 2017 08.
[Is] ISSN:0006-3002
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A highly prevalent IgE-binding protein band of 28kDa is observed when Salsola kali pollen extract is incubated with individual sera from Amaranthaceae pollen sensitized patients. By an immunoproteomic analysis of S. kali pollen extract, we identified this protein band as an allergenic polygalacturonase enzyme. The allergen, named Sal k 6, exhibits a pI of 7.14 and a molecular mass of 39,554.2Da. It presents similarities to Platanaceae, Poaceae, and Cupressaceae allergenic polygalacturonases. cDNA-encoding sequence was subcloned into the pET41b vector and produced in bacteria as a His-tag fusion recombinant protein. The far-UV CD spectrum determined that rSal k 6 was folded. Immunostaining of the S. kali pollen protein extract with a rSal k 6-specific pAb and LC-MS/MS proteomic analyses confirmed the co-existence of the 28kDa band together with an allergenic band of about 47kDa in the pollen extract. Therefore, the 28kDa was assigned as a natural degradation product of the 47kDa integral polygalacturonase. The IgE-binding inhibition to S. kali pollen extract using rSal k 6 as inhibitor showed that signals directed to both protein bands of 28 and 47kDa were completely abrogated. The average prevalence of rSal k 6 among the three populations analyzed was 30%, with values correlating well with the levels of grains/m of Amaranthaceae pollen. Sal k 6 shares IgE epitopes with Oleaceae members (Fraxinus excelsior, Olea europaea and Syringa vulgaris), with IgE-inhibition values ranging from 20% to 60%, respectively. No IgE-inhibition was observed with plant-derived food extracts.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antigens, Plant/metabolism
Glycosides/metabolism
Immunoglobulin E/metabolism
Plant Proteins/metabolism
Pollen/metabolism
Salsola/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Amaranthaceae/chemistry
Amaranthaceae/metabolism
Amino Acid Sequence
Antigens, Plant/chemistry
Base Sequence
Cloning, Molecular/methods
Cross Reactions/physiology
Glycosides/chemistry
Oleaceae/chemistry
Oleaceae/metabolism
Plant Proteins/chemistry
Pollen/chemistry
Protein Binding/physiology
Proteomics/methods
Recombinant Fusion Proteins/chemistry
Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism
Salsola/chemistry
Sequence Alignment
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antigens, Plant); 0 (Glycosides); 0 (Plant Proteins); 0 (Recombinant Fusion Proteins); 37341-29-0 (Immunoglobulin E)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170926
[Lr] Last revision date:170926
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170516
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 28209080
[Au] Autor:Aslam N; Janbaz KH
[Ad] Address:a Department of Pharmacy , Bahauddin Zakariya University , Multan , Pakistan.
[Ti] Title:Antispasmodic and bronchorelaxant activities of Salsola imbricata are mediated through dual Ca antagonistic and ß-adrenergic agonistic effects.
[So] Source:Pharm Biol;55(1):1131-1137, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1744-5116
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CONTEXT: Salsola imbricata Forssk. (Chenopodiaceae) has folkloric repute for the treatment of various gastrointestinal and respiratory ailments. OBJECTIVE: The present study investigates spasmolytic and bronchorelaxant effects of S. imbricata. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The crude aqueous-ethanol extract of the aerial parts of S. imbricata and its fractions, in cumulative concentrations (0.01-10 mg/mL), were tested on contractions of isolated rabbit jejunum and tracheal preparations. Furthermore, concentration response curves (CRCs) of Ca and carbachol were constructed in the absence and presence of the extract. Standard organ bath methods were used. RESULTS: The crude extract relaxed spontaneous, K (80 mM) and carbachol (1 µM)-induced contractions in jejunum preparations with respective EC values of 0.40 (0.35-0.46), 0.69 (0.60-0.79) and 0.66 (0.57-0.75) mg/mL. It shifted Ca CRCs rightward in nonparallel manner. In isolated tracheal preparations, the crude extract caused relaxation of K (80 mM) and carbachol (1 µM)-induced contractions with EC values of 0.86 (0.75-0.98) and 0.74 (0.66-0.84) mg/mL, respectively. It displaced carbachol CRCs rightward with suppression of maximal response. In both tissues, pretreatment with propranolol (1 µM) caused rightward shift in inhibitory CRCs of the extract against carbachol-induced contractions. The ethyl acetate fraction was found more potent in relaxing smooth muscle contractions than the parent extract and its aqueous fraction. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSION: The results suggest that the spasmolytic and bronchorelaxant activities of S. imbricata are related to Ca antagonistic and ß-adrenergic agonistic effects, thus justifying some of the traditional uses of the plant.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adrenergic beta-Agonists/pharmacology
Bronchodilator Agents/pharmacology
Calcium Channel Blockers/pharmacology
Jejunum/drug effects
Muscle Relaxation/drug effects
Muscle, Smooth/drug effects
Parasympatholytics/pharmacology
Plant Extracts/pharmacology
Salsola/chemistry
Trachea/drug effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adrenergic beta-Agonists/isolation & purification
Adrenergic beta-Antagonists/pharmacology
Animals
Bronchodilator Agents/isolation & purification
Calcium Channel Blockers/isolation & purification
Calcium Signaling/drug effects
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Ethanol/chemistry
Female
In Vitro Techniques
Jejunum/metabolism
Male
Muscle, Smooth/metabolism
Parasympatholytics/isolation & purification
Phytotherapy
Plant Components, Aerial
Plant Extracts/isolation & purification
Plants, Medicinal
Rabbits
Solvents/chemistry
Trachea/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Adrenergic beta-Agonists); 0 (Adrenergic beta-Antagonists); 0 (Bronchodilator Agents); 0 (Calcium Channel Blockers); 0 (Parasympatholytics); 0 (Plant Extracts); 0 (Solvents); 3K9958V90M (Ethanol)
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170309
[Lr] Last revision date:170309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170218
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/13880209.2017.1291691

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[PMID]: 28188719
[Au] Autor:Hernández-Moreno KE; Diez LS
[Ad] Address:Universidad de Antioquia, IPS Universitaria, Servicio de Alergología Clínica, Medellín, Colombia. karenhdzm@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Reacción sistémica desencadenada por una prueba por punción cutánea con alimentos frescos. Informe de un caso. [Systemic reaction after performing a food prick-to-prick test. A case report].
[So] Source:Rev Alerg Mex;64(1):126-129, 2017 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0002-5151
[Cp] Country of publication:Mexico
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Skin prick test is the most widely used test for the diagnosis of IgE-mediated conditions. Commercial extracts are used for its performance, but in the case of fruits and vegetables it is preferable using fresh food. Although both tests possess a good safety profile, hypersensitivity reactions have been recorded. CLINICAL CASE: Forty-seven-year old woman with a history of persistent allergic rhinitis, sensitized to the pollen of grasses, olive and salsola; she was referred to an allergology department due to anaphylaxis triggered by the consumption of avocado, cantaloupe, carrots and watermelon. Minutes after skin prick test with standardized extract and skin prick with fresh foods, she developed dyspnea, pruritus, erythema, dizziness and sibilance; she was administered 0.5 mg of intramuscular adrenalin and 4 salbutamol inhalations and placed in the Trendelemburg position. Dyspnea persisted, and vital signs monitoring showed heart and respiratory rates increase and, hence, salbutamol was applied again, together with 2 L/min of oxygen delivered by nasal cannula, intravenous fluids and 100 mg intravenous hydrocortisone; improvement was observed at 40 minutes. The patient was hospitalized for 48 hours. CONCLUSIONS: Although skin tests are safe, the risk of hypersensitivity and anaphylactic reactions should not be ruled out, especially in susceptible patients.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1702
[Cu] Class update date: 170211
[Lr] Last revision date:170211
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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