Database : MEDLINE
Search on : scarlet and fever [Words]
References found : 1379 [refine]
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[PMID]: 29396303
[Au] Autor:Wong SSY; Yuen KY
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology, Carol Yu Centre for Infection, Faculty of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, China.
[Ti] Title:The Comeback of Scarlet Fever.
[So] Source:EBioMedicine;28:7-8, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:2352-3964
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 1379 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29342444
[Au] Autor:You Y; Davies MR; Protani M; McIntyre L; Walker MJ; Zhang J
[Ad] Address:State Key Laboratory of Infectious Disease Prevention and Control, Collaborative Innovation Center for Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, National Institute for Communicable Disease Control and Prevention, Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing, 102206, China.
[Ti] Title:Scarlet Fever Epidemic in China Caused by Streptococcus pyogenes Serotype M12: Epidemiologic and Molecular Analysis.
[So] Source:EBioMedicine;28:128-135, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:2352-3964
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:From 2011, Hong Kong and mainland China have witnessed a sharp increase in reported cases, with subsequent reports of epidemic scarlet fever in North Asia and the United Kingdom. Here we examine epidemiological data and investigate the genomic context of the predominantly serotype M12 Streptococcus pyogenes scarlet fever isolates from mainland China. Incident case data was obtained from the Chinese Nationwide Notifiable Infectious Diseases Reporting Information System. The relative risk of scarlet fever in recent outbreak years 2011-2016 was calculated using the median age-standardised incidence rate, compared to years 2003-2010 prior this outbreak. Whole genome sequencing was performed on 32 emm12 scarlet fever isolates and 13 emm12 non-scarlet fever isolates collected from different geographic regions of China, and compared with 203 published emm12 S. pyogenes genomes predominantly from scarlet fever outbreaks in Hong Kong (n=134) and the United Kingdom (n=63). We found during the outbreak period (2011-2016), the median age-standardised incidence in China was 4.14/100,000 (95% confidence interval (CI) 4.11-4.18), 2.62-fold higher (95% CI 2.57-2.66) than that of 1.58/100,000 (95% CI 1.56-1.61) during the baseline period prior to the outbreak (2003-2010). Highest incidence was reported for children 5years of age (80.5/100,000). Streptococcal toxin encoding prophage φHKU.vir and φHKU.ssa in addition to the macrolide and tetracycline resistant ICE-emm12 and ICE-HKU397 elements were found amongst mainland China multi-clonal emm12 isolates suggesting a role in selection and expansion of scarlet fever lineages in China. Global dissemination of toxin encoded prophage has played a role in the expansion of scarlet fever emm12 clones. These findings emphasize the role of comprehensive surveillance approaches for monitoring of epidemic human disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 1379 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29191628
[Au] Autor:Lamagni T; Guy R; Chand M; Henderson KL; Chalker V; Lewis J; Saliba V; Elliot AJ; Smith GE; Rushton S; Sheridan EA; Ramsay M; Johnson AP
[Ad] Address:National Infection Service, Public Health England, London, UK; National Institute for Health Research Health Protection Research Unit in Healthcare-Associated Infection & Antimicrobial Resistance, Imperial College, London, UK. Electronic address: theresa.lamagni@phe.gov.uk.
[Ti] Title:Resurgence of scarlet fever in England, 2014-16: a population-based surveillance study.
[So] Source:Lancet Infect Dis;18(2):180-187, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1474-4457
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: After decades of decreasing scarlet fever incidence, a dramatic increase was seen in England beginning in 2014. Investigations were launched to assess clinical and epidemiological patterns and identify potential causes. METHODS: In this population-based surveillance study, we analysed statutory scarlet fever notifications held by Public Health England from 1911 to 2016 in England and Wales to identify periods of sudden escalation of scarlet fever. Characteristics of cases and outbreaks in England including frequency of complications and hospital admissions were assessed and compared with the pre-upsurge period. Isolates from throat swabs were obtained and were emm typed. FINDINGS: Data were retrieved for our analysis between Jan 1, 1911, and Dec 31, 2016. Population rates of scarlet fever increased by a factor of three between 2013 and 2014 from 8·2 to 27·2 per 100 000 (rate ratio [RR] 3·34, 95% CI 3·23-3·45; p<0·0001); further increases were observed in 2015 (30·6 per 100 000) and in 2016 (33·2 per 100 000), which reached the highest number of cases (19 206) and rate of scarlet fever notifcation since 1967. The median age of cases in 2014 was 4 years (IQR 3-7) with an incidence of 186 per 100 000 children under age 10 years. All parts of England saw an increase in incidence, with 620 outbreaks reported in 2016. Hospital admissions for scarlet fever increased by 97% between 2013 and 2016; one in 40 cases were admitted for management of the condition or potential complications. Analysis of strains (n=303) identified a diversity of emm types with emm3 (43%), emm12 (15%), emm1 (11%), and emm4 (9%) being the most common. Longitudinal analysis identified 4-yearly periodicity in population incidence of scarlet fever but of consistently lower magnitude than the current escalation. INTERPRETATION: England is experiencing an unprecedented rise in scarlet fever with the highest incidence for nearly 50 years. Reasons for this escalation are unclear and identifying these remains a public health priority. FUNDING: None.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 1379 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29191627
[Au] Autor:Walker MJ; Brouwer S
[Ad] Address:School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, QLD 4072, Australia. Electronic address: mark.walker@uq.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Scarlet fever makes a comeback.
[So] Source:Lancet Infect Dis;18(2):128-129, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1474-4457
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180207
[Lr] Last revision date:180207
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 1379 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29260684
[Au] Autor:Kim JH; Cheong HK
[Ti] Title:Increasing Number of Scarlet Fever Cases, South Korea, 2011-2016.
[So] Source:Emerg Infect Dis;24(1):172-173, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1080-6059
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The increasing number of reported scarlet fever cases during 2011‒2016 in the National Notifiable Infectious Disease database in South Korea occurred because of increased overall reporting and expanded reporting criteria rather than because of increasing scarlet fever incidence. Further increases are anticipated because of other expansions in reporting requirements.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180119
[Lr] Last revision date:180119
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3201/eid2401.171027

  6 / 1379 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29270740
[Au] Autor:Wang RP; Jiang YG; Zhao GM; Guo XQ; Michael E
[Ad] Address:School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200032, China. w19830901@126.com.
[Ti] Title:'Outbreak Gold Standard' selection to provide optimized threshold for infectious diseases early-alert based on China Infectious Disease Automated-alert and Response System.
[So] Source:J Huazhong Univ Sci Technolog Med Sci;37(6):833-841, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1672-0733
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The China Infectious Disease Automated-alert and Response System (CIDARS) was successfully implemented and became operational nationwide in 2008. The CIDARS plays an important role in and has been integrated into the routine outbreak monitoring efforts of the Center for Disease Control (CDC) at all levels in China. In the CIDARS, thresholds are determined using the "Mean+2SD? in the early stage which have limitations. This study compared the performance of optimized thresholds defined using the "Mean +2SD? method to the performance of 5 novel algorithms to select optimal "Outbreak Gold Standard (OGS)? and corresponding thresholds for outbreak detection. Data for infectious disease were organized by calendar week and year. The "Mean+2SD?, C1, C2, moving average (MA), seasonal model (SM), and cumulative sum (CUSUM) algorithms were applied. Outbreak signals for the predicted value (Px) were calculated using a percentile-based moving window. When the outbreak signals generated by an algorithm were in line with a Px generated outbreak signal for each week, this Px was then defined as the optimized threshold for that algorithm. In this study, six infectious diseases were selected and classified into TYPE A (chickenpox and mumps), TYPE B (influenza and rubella) and TYPE C [hand foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and scarlet fever]. Optimized thresholds for chickenpox (P ), mumps (P ), influenza (P , P , and P ), rubella (P and P ), HFMD (P and P ), and scarlet fever (P and P ) were identified. The C1, C2, CUSUM, SM, and MA algorithms were appropriate for TYPE A. All 6 algorithms were appropriate for TYPE B. C1 and CUSUM algorithms were appropriate for TYPE C. It is critical to incorporate more flexible algorithms as OGS into the CIDRAS and to identify the proper OGS and corresponding recommended optimized threshold by different infectious disease types.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171225
[Lr] Last revision date:171225
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11596-017-1814-9

  7 / 1379 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29093407
[Au] Autor:Ocho K; Iwamuro M; Hasegawa K; Hagiya H; Rai K; Yumoto T; Otsuka F
[Ad] Address:Department of General Medicine, Okayama University Graduate School of Medicine, Dentistry, and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Far East Scarlet-like Fever Masquerading as Adult-onset Kawasaki Disease.
[So] Source:Intern Med;, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1349-7235
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A previously healthy 31-year-old man was referred to us with refractory septic shock accompanied by bilateral conjunctival congestion and erythema of his right lower limb. Nine days after admission, he had bilateral desquamation of the fingertips, and his presentation satisfied the criteria for Kawasaki disease. A serological examination was positive for Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, and he was diagnosed with Far East scarlet-like fever (FESLF). Interestingly, his 11-month-old baby boy had similar symptoms around the same time, indicating the intrafamilial transmission of the pathogen. We should consider FESLF when we encounter a familial occurrence of systemic manifestations of Kawasaki disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2169/internalmedicine.9250-17

  8 / 1379 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29081840
[Au] Autor:Basetti S; Hodgson J; Rawson TM; Majeed A
[Ad] Address:School of Medicine, Imperial College London, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Scarlet fever: a guide for general practitioners.
[So] Source:London J Prim Care (Abingdon);9(5):77-79, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1757-1472
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:There has been an increase in the incidence of scarlet fever with most cases presenting in General Practice and Emergency Departments. Cases present with a distinctive macro-papular rash, usually in children. This article aims to increase awareness of scarlet fever by highlighting key symptoms and stating potential complications if untreated. In patients who have the typical symptoms, a prescription of a suitable antibiotic such as phenoxymethylpenicillin (Penicillin V) should be made immediately to reduce the risk of complications and the spread of infection.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171101
[Lr] Last revision date:171101
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/17571472.2017.1365677

  9 / 1379 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28951419
[Au] Autor:Soderholm AT; Barnett TC; Sweet MJ; Walker MJ
[Ad] Address:School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences, Australian Infectious Diseases Research Centre, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia.
[Ti] Title:Group A streptococcal pharyngitis: immune responses involved in bacterial clearance and GAS-associated immunopathologies.
[So] Source:J Leukoc Biol;, 2017 Sep 26.
[Is] ISSN:1938-3673
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:, the Group A (GAS), is the most common cause of bacterial pharyngitis in children and adults. Innate and adaptive host immune responses are fundamental for defense against streptococcal pharyngitis and are central to the clinical manifestation of disease. Host immune responses also contribute to the severe poststreptococcal immune diseases that constitute the major disease burden for this organism. However, until recently, little was known about the host responses elicited during infection. Cellular mediators of innate immunity used during host defense against GAS include epithelial cells, neutrophils, macrophages, and dendritic cells (DCs), which are reported to secrete a number of soluble inflammatory mediators, such as antimicrobial peptides (AMPs); eicosanoids, including PGE and leukotriene B4 (LTB ); chemokines; and proinflammatory cytokines. Th1 and Th17 responses play significant roles in adaptive immunity in both murine models of GAS pharyngitis and in human tonsil tissue. A number of inflammatory complications are associated with GAS pharyngitis, which can lead to chronic disease in patients. These include scarlet fever, tonsillar hypertrophy, and sleep apnea, as well as postinfectious sequelae, such as acute rheumatic fever (ARF), poststreptococcal glomerulonephritis, and guttate psoriasis (GP). This review aims to present the current state of knowledge on innate and adaptive immune responses elicited during GAS pharyngitis, mechanisms by which GAS evades these responses, the emerging role of the pharyngeal microbiota, and how the interplay among these factors can influence the outcome of infection and inflammation-related complications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170928
[Lr] Last revision date:170928
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 1379 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28935732
[Au] Autor:Suvorova MA; Tsapieva AN; Bak EG; Chereshnev VA; Kiseleva EP; Suvorov AN; Arumugam M
[Ad] Address:Department of Molecular Microbiology, Institute of Experimental Medicine, Saint Petersburg, Russian Federation.
[Ti] Title:Complete Genome Sequences of Type Strain GUR, with Antitumor Activity, and Its Derivative Strain GURSA1 with an Inactivated Gene.
[So] Source:Genome Announc;5(38), 2017 Sep 21.
[Is] ISSN:2169-8287
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We present here the complete genome sequence of type strain GUR, a throat isolate from a scarlet fever patient, which has been used to treat cancer patients in the former Soviet Union. We also present the complete genome sequence of its derivative strain GURSA1 with an inactivated gene.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170927
[Lr] Last revision date:170927
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE


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