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[PMID]: 25088238
[Au] Autor:Hull HR; Thornton J; Paley C; Navder K; Gallagher D
[Ad] Address:Department of Dietetics and Nutrition, University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS, USA....
[Ti] Title:Maternal obesity influences the relationship between location of neonate fat mass and total fat mass.
[So] Source:Pediatr Obes;10(4):245-51, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:2047-6310
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: It is suggested that maternal obesity perpetuates offspring obesity to future generations. OBJECTIVE: To determine whether location of neonate fat mass (FM: central vs. peripheral) is related to total neonate FM and whether maternal obesity influences this relationship. METHODS: Neonate body composition and skin-fold thicknesses were assessed in healthy neonates (n = 371; 1-3 days old). Linear regression models examined the relationship between total FM and location of FM (central vs. peripheral). Location of FM was calculated by skin-folds: peripheral was the sum of (biceps and triceps)/2 and central was represented by the subscapular skin-fold. RESULTS: A significant interaction was found for location of FM and maternal obesity. Holding all predictors constant, in offspring born to non-obese mothers, a 0.5 mm increase in central FM predicted a 15 g greater total FM, whereas a 0.5 mm increase in peripheral FM predicted a 66 g greater total FM. However, in offspring born to obese mothers, a 0.5 mm increase in central FM predicted a 56 g total FM, whereas a 0.5 mm increase in peripheral FM predicted a 14 g greater total FM. CONCLUSIONS: The relationship between total FM and location of FM is influenced by maternal obesity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Cu] Class update date: 150718
[Lr] Last revision date:150718
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/ijpo.257

  2 / 618513 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25973735
[Au] Autor:Dai J; Huen AO; Kestenbaum LA; Sarezky MD; Coughlin CC; Yan AC
[Ad] Address:Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania....
[Ti] Title:Achromobacter xylosoxidans Bacteremia and Cellulitis: A Report of a Case.
[So] Source:Pediatr Dermatol;32(4):e186-7, 2015 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1525-1470
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Achromobacter xylosoxidans is a rare, opportunistic infection most commonly encountered in immunocompromised patients during hospitalization. Primary uncomplicated bacteremia, catheter-associated infections, and pneumonia have been reported as the most common clinical presentations; skin and soft tissue infections from A. xylosoxidans are rare. We describe a case of A. xylosoxidans presenting as cellulitis and bacteremia in an immunocompromised patient.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Cu] Class update date: 150718
[Lr] Last revision date:150718
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/pde.12608

  3 / 618513 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26181261
[Au] Autor:Fitzmaurice C; Dicker D; Pain A; Hamavid H; Moradi-Lakeh M; MacIntyre MF; Allen C; Hansen G; Woodbrook R; Wolfe C; Hamadeh RR; Moore A; Werdecker A; Gessner BD; Te Ao B; McMahon B; Karimkhani C; Yu C; Cooke GS; Schwebel DC; Carpenter DO; Pereira DM; Nash D; Kazi DS; De Leo D; Plass D; Ukwaja KN; Thurston GD; Yun Jin K; Simard EP; Mills E; Park EK; Catalá-López F; deVeber G; Gotay C; Khan G; Hosgood HD; Santos IS; Leasher JL; Singh J; Leigh J; Jonas J; Sanabria J; Beardsley J; Jacobsen KH; Takahashi K; Franklin RC; Ronfani L; Montico M; Naldi L; Global Burden of Disease Cancer Collaboration
[Ad] Address:Division of Hematology, Department of Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle2Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation, University of Washington, Seattle....
[Ti] Title:The Global Burden of Cancer 2013.
[So] Source:JAMA Oncol;1(4):505-27, 2015 Jul 1.
[Is] ISSN:2374-2445
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:IMPORTANCE: Cancer is among the leading causes of death worldwide. Current estimates of cancer burden in individual countries and regions are necessary to inform local cancer control strategies. OBJECTIVE: To estimate mortality, incidence, years lived with disability (YLDs), years of life lost (YLLs), and disability-adjusted life-years (DALYs) for 28 cancers in 188 countries by sex from 1990 to 2013. EVIDENCE REVIEW: The general methodology of the Global Burden of Disease (GBD) 2013 study was used. Cancer registries were the source for cancer incidence data as well as mortality incidence (MI) ratios. Sources for cause of death data include vital registration system data, verbal autopsy studies, and other sources. The MI ratios were used to transform incidence data to mortality estimates and cause of death estimates to incidence estimates. Cancer prevalence was estimated using MI ratios as surrogates for survival data; YLDs were calculated by multiplying prevalence estimates with disability weights, which were derived from population-based surveys; YLLs were computed by multiplying the number of estimated cancer deaths at each age with a reference life expectancy; and DALYs were calculated as the sum of YLDs and YLLs. FINDINGS: In 2013 there were 14.9 million incident cancer cases, 8.2 million deaths, and 196.3 million DALYs. Prostate cancer was the leading cause for cancer incidence (1.4 million) for men and breast cancer for women (1.8 million). Tracheal, bronchus, and lung (TBL) cancer was the leading cause for cancer death in men and women, with 1.6 million deaths. For men, TBL cancer was the leading cause of DALYs (24.9 million). For women, breast cancer was the leading cause of DALYs (13.1 million). Age-standardized incidence rates (ASIRs) per 100 000 and age-standardized death rates (ASDRs) per 100 000 for both sexes in 2013 were higher in developing vs developed countries for stomach cancer (ASIR, 17 vs 14; ASDR, 15 vs 11), liver cancer (ASIR, 15 vs 7; ASDR, 16 vs 7), esophageal cancer (ASIR, 9 vs 4; ASDR, 9 vs 4), cervical cancer (ASIR, 8 vs 5; ASDR, 4 vs 2), lip and oral cavity cancer (ASIR, 7 vs 6; ASDR, 2 vs 2), and nasopharyngeal cancer (ASIR, 1.5 vs 0.4; ASDR, 1.2 vs 0.3). Between 1990 and 2013, ASIRs for all cancers combined (except nonmelanoma skin cancer and Kaposi sarcoma) increased by more than 10% in 113 countries and decreased by more than 10% in 12 of 188 countries. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: Cancer poses a major threat to public health worldwide, and incidence rates have increased in most countries since 1990. The trend is a particular threat to developing nations with health systems that are ill-equipped to deal with complex and expensive cancer treatments. The annual update on the Global Burden of Cancer will provide all stakeholders with timely estimates to guide policy efforts in cancer prevention, screening, treatment, and palliation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Cu] Class update date: 150718
[Lr] Last revision date:150718
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamaoncol.2015.0735

  4 / 618513 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26183973
[Au] Autor:Ho BK; Robinson JK
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois.
[Ti] Title:Color bar tool for skin type self-identification: A cross-sectional study.
[So] Source:J Am Acad Dermatol;73(2):312-313.e1, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1097-6787
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Cu] Class update date: 150718
[Lr] Last revision date:150718
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 618513 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25963063
[Au] Autor:Linardi RL; Megee SO; Mainardi SR; Senoo M; Galantino-Homer HL
[Ad] Address:Department of Clinical Studies, New Bolton Center, 382 West Street Road, Kennett Square, PA, 19348, USA....
[Ti] Title:Expression and localization of epithelial stem cell and differentiation markers in equine skin, eye and hoof.
[So] Source:Vet Dermatol;26(4):213-e47, 2015 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3164
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The limited characterization of equine skin, eye and hoof epithelial stem cell (ESC) and differentiation markers impedes the investigation of the physiology and pathophysiology of these tissues. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: To characterize ESC and differentiation marker expression in epithelial tissues of the equine eye, haired skin and hoof capsule. METHODS: Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy and immunoblotting were used to detect expression and tissue localization of keratin (K) isoforms K3, K10, K14 and K124, the transcription factor p63 (a marker of ESCs) and phosphorylated p63 [pp63; a marker of ESC transition to transit-amplifying (TA) cell] in epithelial tissues of the foot (haired skin, hoof coronet and hoof lamellae) and the eye (limbus and cornea). RESULTS: Expression of K14 was restricted to the basal layer of epidermal lamellae and to basal and adjacent suprabasal layers of the haired skin, coronet and corneal limbus. Coronary and lamellar epidermis was negative for both K3 and K10, which were expressed in the cornea/limbus epithelium and haired skin epidermis, respectively. Variable expression of p63 with relatively low to high levels of phosphorylation was detected in individual basal and suprabasal cells of all epithelial tissues examined. CONCLUSIONS: To the best of the author's knowledge, this is the first report of the characterization of tissue-specific keratin marker expression and the localization of putative epithelial progenitor cell populations, including ESCs (high p63 expression with low pp63 levels) and TA cells (high expression of both p63 and pp63), in the horse. These results will aid further investigation of epidermal and corneal epithelial biology and regenerative therapies in horses.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Cu] Class update date: 150718
[Lr] Last revision date:150718
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/vde.12214

  6 / 618513 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25805798
[Au] Autor:Goldberg JM; Fisher DE; Demetri GD; Neuberg D; Allsop SA; Fonseca C; Nakazaki Y; Nemer D; Raut CP; George S; Morgan JA; Wagner AJ; Freeman GJ; Ritz J; Lezcano C; Mihm M; Canning C; Hodi FS; Dranoff G
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts. Department of Pediatrics, Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Miami Miller Sch...
[Ti] Title:Biologic Activity of Autologous, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor Secreting Alveolar Soft-Part Sarcoma and Clear Cell Sarcoma Vaccines.
[So] Source:Clin Cancer Res;21(14):3178-86, 2015 Jul 15.
[Is] ISSN:1078-0432
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Alveolar soft-part sarcoma (ASPS) and clear cell sarcoma (CCS) are rare mesenchymal malignancies driven by chromosomal translocations that activate members of the microphthalmia transcription factor (MITF) family. However, in contrast to malignant melanoma, little is known about their immunogenicity. To learn more about the host response to ASPS and CCS, we conducted a phase I clinical trial of vaccination with irradiated, autologous sarcoma cells engineered by adenoviral-mediated gene transfer to secrete granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Metastatic tumors from ASPS and CCS patients were resected, processed to single-cell suspensions, transduced with a replication-defective adenoviral vector encoding GM-CSF, and irradiated. Immunizations were administered subcutaneously and intradermally weekly three times and then every other week. RESULTS: Vaccines were successfully manufactured for 11 of the 12 enrolled patients. Eleven subjects received from three to 13 immunizations. Toxicities were restricted to grade 1-2 skin reactions at inoculation sites. Vaccination elicited local dendritic cell infiltrates and stimulated T cell-mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions to irradiated, autologous tumor cells. Antibody responses to tissue-type plasminogen activator (tTPA) and angiopoietins-1/2 were detected. Tumor biopsies showed programmed death-1 (PD-1)-positive CD8(+) T cells in association with PD ligand-1 (PD-L1)-expressing sarcoma cells. No tumor regressions were observed. CONCLUSIONS: Vaccination with irradiated, GM-CSF-secreting autologous sarcoma cell vaccines is feasible, safe, and biologically active. Concurrent targeting of angiogenic cytokines and antagonism of the PD-1-negative regulatory pathway might intensify immune-mediated tumor destruction. Clin Cancer Res; 21(14); 3178-86. ©2015 AACR.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Cu] Class update date: 150718
[Lr] Last revision date:150718
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1158/1078-0432.CCR-14-2932

  7 / 618513 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26118544
[Au] Autor:Sarmiento JM; Venteicher AS; Patil CG
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, 127 S. San Vicente Blvd #A6600, Los Angeles, CA, USA, 90048.
[Ti] Title:Early versus delayed postoperative radiotherapy for treatment of low-grade gliomas.
[So] Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev;6:CD009229, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1469-493X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: In most people with low-grade gliomas (LGG), the primary treatment regimen remains a combination of surgery followed by postoperative radiotherapy. However, the optimal timing of radiotherapy is controversial. It is unclear whether to use radiotherapy in the early postoperative period, or whether radiotherapy should be delayed until tumour progression occurs. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of early postoperative radiotherapy versus radiotherapy delayed until tumour progression for low-grade intracranial gliomas in people who had initial biopsy or surgical resection. SEARCH METHODS: We searched up to September 2014 the following electronic databases: the Cochrane Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, Issue 8, 2014), MEDLINE (1948 to Aug week 3, 2014), and EMBASE (1980 to Aug week 3, 2014) to identify trials for inclusion in this Cochrane review. SELECTION CRITERIA: We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared early versus delayed radiotherapy following biopsy or surgical resection for the treatment of people with newly diagnosed intracranial LGG (astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma, mixed oligoastrocytoma, astroblastoma, xanthoastrocytoma, or ganglioglioma). Radiotherapy may include conformal external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) with linear accelerator or cobalt-60 sources, intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT), or stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: Three review authors independently assessed the trials for inclusion and risk of bias, and extracted study data. We resolved any differences between review authors by discussion. Adverse effects were also extracted from the study report. We performed meta-analyses using a random-effects model with inverse variance weighting. MAIN RESULTS: We included one large, multi-institutional, prospective RCT, involving 311 participants; the risk of bias in this study was unclear. This study found that early postoperative radiotherapy is associated with an increase in time to progression compared to observation (and delayed radiotherapy upon disease progression) for people with LGG but does not significantly improve overall survival (OS). The median progression-free survival (PFS) was 5.3 years in the early radiotherapy group and 3.4 years in the delayed radiotherapy group (hazard ratio (HR) 0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.45 to 0.77; P value < 0.0001; 311 participants; 1 trail; low quality evidence). The median OS in the early radiotherapy group was 7.4 years, while the delayed radiotherapy group experienced a median overall survival of 7.2 years (HR 0.97, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.33; P value = 0.872; 311 participants; 1 trail; low quality evidence). The total dose of radiotherapy given was 54 Gy; five fractions of 1.8 Gy per week were given for six weeks. Adverse effects following radiotherapy consisted of skin reactions, otitis media, mild headache, nausea, and vomiting. Rescue therapy was provided to 65% of the participants randomised to delayed radiotherapy. People in both cohorts who were free from tumour progression showed no differences in cognitive deficit, focal deficit, performance status, and headache after one year. However, participants randomised to the early radiotherapy group experienced significantly fewer seizures than participants in the delayed postoperative radiotherapy group at one year (25% versus 41%, P value = 0.0329, respectively). AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: Given the high risk of bias in the included study, the results of this analysis must be interpreted with caution. Early radiation therapy was associated with the following adverse effects: skin reactions, otitis media, mild headache, nausea, and vomiting. People with LGG who undergo early radiotherapy showed an increase in time to progression compared with people who were observed and had radiotherapy at the time of progression. There was no significant difference in overall survival between people who had early versus delayed radiotherapy; however, this finding may be due to the effectiveness of rescue therapy with radiation in the control arm. People who underwent early radiation had better seizure control at one year than people who underwent delayed radiation. There were no cases of radiation-induced malignant transformation of LGG. However, it remains unclear whether there are differences in memory, executive function, cognitive function, or quality of life between the two groups since these measures were not evaluated.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1507
[Cu] Class update date: 150718
[Lr] Last revision date:150718
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/14651858.CD009229.pub2

  8 / 618513 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25248543
[Au] Autor:Venkatesan L; Barlow SM; Kieweg D
[Ad] Address:Communication Neuroscience Laboratories, University of Nebraska , Lincoln, NE , USA .
[Ti] Title:Age- and sex-related changes in vibrotactile sensitivity of hand and face in neurotypical adults.
[So] Source:Somatosens Mot Res;32(1):44-50, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1369-1651
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sensory perception decreases with age, and is altered as a function of sex. Very little is known about the age- and sex-related changes in vibrotactile detection thresholds (VDTs) of the face relative to the glabrous hand. This study utilized a single-interval up/down (SIUD) adaptive procedure to estimate the VDT for mechanical stimuli presented at 5, 10, 50, 150, 250, and 300 Hz at two sites on the face, including the right non-glabrous surface of the oral angle and the right lower lip vermilion; and on the hand on the glabrous surface of the distal phalanx of the right dominant index finger. Eighteen right-handed healthy younger adults and 18 right-handed healthy older adults participated in this study. VDTs were significantly different between the three stimulus sites (p < 0.0001), and dependent on stimulus frequency (p < 0.0001) and the sex of the participants (p < 0.005). VDTs were significantly higher for older adults when compared to younger adults for the finger stimulation condition (p < 0.05). There were significant differences (p < 0.05) in cheek and lower lip VDTs between male and female subjects. Difference in the VDTs between the three stimulation sites is presumed to reflect the unique typing and distribution of mechanoreceptors in the face and hand. Age-related differences in finger skin sensitivity are likely due to changes in the physical structure of skin, changes in the number and morphology of the mechanoreceptors, differences in the functional use of the hand, and its central representation. Sex-related differences in the VDTs may be due to the differences in tissue conformation and thickness, mechanoreceptor densities, skin hydration, or temperature characteristics.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1505
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3109/08990220.2014.958216

  9 / 618513 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25059799
[Au] Autor:Kafri M; Zaltsberg N; Dickstein R
[Ad] Address:Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Social Welfare and Health Sciences, University of Haifa , Haifa , Israel.
[Ti] Title:EMG activity of finger flexor muscles and grip force following low-dose transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation in healthy adult subjects.
[So] Source:Somatosens Mot Res;32(1):1-7, 2015 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1369-1651
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Somatosensory stimulation modulates cortical and corticospinal excitability and consequently affects motor output. Therefore, low-amplitude transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) has the potential to elicit favorable motor responses. The purpose of the two presented pilot studies was to shed light on TENS parameters that are relevant for the enhancement of two desirable motor outcomes, namely, electromyographic (EMG) activity and contraction strength of the finger flexors and wrist muscles. In 5 and 10 healthy young adults (in Study I and Study II, respectively) TENS was delivered to the volar aspect of the forearm. We manipulated TENS frequency (150 Hz vs. 5 Hz), length of application (10, 20, and 60 min), and side of application (unilateral, right forearm vs. bilateral forearms). EMG amplitude and grip force were measured before (Pre), immediately after (Post), and following 15 min of no stimulation (Study I only). The results indicated that low-frequency bursts of TENS applied to the skin overlying the finger flexor muscles enhance the EMG activity of the finger flexors and grip force. The increase in EMG activity of the flexor muscles was observed after 20 min of stimulation, while grip force was increased only after 1 h. The effects of uni- and bilateral TENS were comparable. These observations allude to a modulatory effect of TENS on the tested motor responses; however, unequivocal conclusions of the findings are hampered by individual differences that affect motor outcomes, such as in level of attention.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1505
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3109/08990220.2014.937413

  10 / 618513 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25992576
[Au] Autor:Lötsch J; Dimova V; Lieb I; Zimmermann M; Oertel BG; Ultsch A
[Ad] Address:Institute of Clinical Pharmacology, Goethe-University, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60590, Frankfurt am Main, Germany; Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology IME, Project Group Translational Medicine and Pharmacology TMP, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 60596, Frankfurt am Main, Germany....
[Ti] Title:Multimodal distribution of human cold pain thresholds.
[So] Source:PLoS One;10(5):e0125822, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: It is assumed that different pain phenotypes are based on varying molecular pathomechanisms. Distinct ion channels seem to be associated with the perception of cold pain, in particular TRPM8 and TRPA1 have been highlighted previously. The present study analyzed the distribution of cold pain thresholds with focus at describing the multimodality based on the hypothesis that it reflects a contribution of distinct ion channels. METHODS: Cold pain thresholds (CPT) were available from 329 healthy volunteers (aged 18 - 37 years; 159 men) enrolled in previous studies. The distribution of the pooled and log-transformed threshold data was described using a kernel density estimation (Pareto Density Estimation (PDE)) and subsequently, the log data was modeled as a mixture of Gaussian distributions using the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to optimize the fit. RESULTS: CPTs were clearly multi-modally distributed. Fitting a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to the log-transformed threshold data revealed that the best fit is obtained when applying a three-model distribution pattern. The modes of the identified three Gaussian distributions, retransformed from the log domain to the mean stimulation temperatures at which the subjects had indicated pain thresholds, were obtained at 23.7 °C, 13.2 °C and 1.5 °C for Gaussian #1, #2 and #3, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The localization of the first and second Gaussians was interpreted as reflecting the contribution of two different cold sensors. From the calculated localization of the modes of the first two Gaussians, the hypothesis of an involvement of TRPM8, sensing temperatures from 25 - 24 °C, and TRPA1, sensing cold from 17 °C can be derived. In that case, subjects belonging to either Gaussian would possess a dominance of the one or the other receptor at the skin area where the cold stimuli had been applied. The findings therefore support a suitability of complex analytical approaches to detect mechanistically determined patterns from pain phenotype data.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1505
[Cu] Class update date: 150530
[Lr] Last revision date:150530
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0125822


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