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[PMID]: 25284151
[Au] Autor:Seedorf H; Griffin NW; Ridaura VK; Reyes A; Cheng J; Rey FE; Smith MI; Simon GM; Scheffrahn RH; Woebken D; Spormann AM; Van Treuren W; Ursell LK; Pirrung M; Robbins-Pianka A; Cantarel BL; Lombard V; Henrissat B; Knight R; Gordon JI
[Ad] Address:Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63108, USA....
[Ti] Title:Bacteria from diverse habitats colonize and compete in the mouse gut.
[So] Source:Cell;159(2):253-66, 2014 Oct 9.
[Is] ISSN:1097-4172
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To study how microbes establish themselves in a mammalian gut environment, we colonized germ-free mice with microbial communities from human, zebrafish, and termite guts, human skin and tongue, soil, and estuarine microbial mats. Bacteria from these foreign environments colonized and persisted in the mouse gut; their capacity to metabolize dietary and host carbohydrates and bile acids correlated with colonization success. Cohousing mice harboring these xenomicrobiota or a mouse cecal microbiota, along with germ-free "bystanders," revealed the success of particular bacterial taxa in invading guts with established communities and empty gut habitats. Unanticipated patterns of ecological succession were observed; for example, a soil-derived bacterium dominated even in the presence of bacteria from other gut communities (zebrafish and termite), and human-derived bacteria colonized germ-free bystander mice before mouse-derived organisms. This approach can be generalized to address a variety of mechanistic questions about succession, including succession in the context of microbiota-directed therapeutics.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 597730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25042734
[Au] Autor:Ringdén O; Brazauskas R; Wang Z; Ahmed I; Atsuta Y; Buchbinder D; Burns LJ; Cahn JY; Duncan C; Hale GA; Halter J; Hayashi RJ; Hsu JW; Jacobsohn DA; Kamble RT; Kamani NR; Kasow KA; Khera N; Lazarus HM; Loren AW; Marks DI; Myers KC; Ramanathan M; Saber W; Savani BN; Schouten HC; Socie G; Sorror ML; Steinberg A; Popat U; Wingard JR; Mattsson J; Majhail NS
[Ad] Address:Center for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation, Karolinka University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden....
[Ti] Title:Second solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation using reduced-intensity conditioning.
[So] Source:Biol Blood Marrow Transplant;20(11):1777-84, 2014 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1523-6536
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We examined risk of second solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (AHCT) using reduced-intensity/nonmyeloablative conditioning (RIC/NMC). RIC/NMC recipients with leukemia/myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (n = 2833) and lymphoma (n = 1436) between 1995 and 2006 were included. In addition, RIC/NMC recipients 40 to 60 years of age (n = 2138) were compared with patients of the same age receiving myeloablative conditioning (MAC, n = 6428). The cumulative incidence of solid cancers was 3.35% at 10 years. There was no increase in overall cancer risk compared with the general population (leukemia/MDS: standardized incidence ratio [SIR] .99, P = 1.00; lymphoma: SIR .92, P = .75). However, risks were significantly increased in leukemia/MDS patients for cancers of lip (SIR 14.28), tonsil (SIR 8.66), oropharynx (SIR 46.70), bone (SIR 23.53), soft tissue (SIR 12.92), and vulva (SIR 18.55) and skin melanoma (SIR 3.04). Lymphoma patients had significantly higher risks of oropharyngeal cancer (SIR 67.35) and skin melanoma (SIR 3.52). Among RIC/NMC recipients, age >50 years was the only independent risk factor for solid cancers (hazard ratio [HR] 3.02, P < .001). Among patients ages 40 to 60 years, when adjusted for other factors, there was no difference in cancer risks between RIC/NMC and MAC in leukemia/MDS patients (HR .98, P = .905). In lymphoma patients, risks were lower after RIC/NMC (HR .51, P = .047). In conclusion, the overall risks of second solid cancers in RIC/NMC recipients are similar to the general population, although there is an increased risk of cancer at some sites. Studies with longer follow-up are needed to realize the complete risks of solid cancers after RIC/NMC AHCT.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 597730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24261459
[Au] Autor:Suliman NM; Astrøm AN; Ali RW; Salman H; Johannessen AC
[Ti] Title:Clinical and histological characterization of oral pemphigus lesions in patients with skin diseases: a cross sectional study from Sudan.
[So] Source:BMC Oral Health;13(1):66, 2013.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6831
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Pemphigus is a rare group of life-threatening mucocutaneous autoimmune blistering diseases. Frequently, oral lesions precede the cutaneous ones. This study aimed to describe clinical and histological features of oral pemphigus lesions in patients aged 18 years and above, attending outpatient's facility of Khartoum Teaching Hospital - Dermatology Clinic, Sudan. In addition, the study aimed to assess the diagnostic significance of routine histolopathology along with immunohistochemical (IHC) examination of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsy specimens in patients with oral pemphigus. METHODS: A cross-sectional hospital-based study was conducted from October 2008 to January 2009. A total of 588 patients with confirmed disease diagnosis completed an oral examination and a personal interview. Clinical evaluations supported with histopathology were the methods of diagnosis. IHC was used to confirm the diagnosis. Location, size, and pain of oral lesions were used to measure the oral disease activity. RESULTS: Twenty-one patients were diagnosed with pemphigus vulgaris (PV), 19 of them (mean age: 43.0; range: 20-72 yrs) presented with oral manifestations. Pemphigus foliaceus was diagnosed in one patient. In PV, female: male ratio was 1.1:1.0. Buccal mucosa was the most commonly affected site. Exclusive oral lesions were detected in 14.2% (3/21). In patients who experienced both skin and oral lesion during their life time, 50.0% (9/18) had oral mucosa as the initial site of involvement, 33.3% (6/18) had skin as the primary site, and simultaneous involvement of both skin and oral mucosa was reported by 5.5% (1/18). Two patients did not provide information regarding the initial site of involvement. Oral lesion activity score was higher in those who reported to live outside Khartoum state, were outdoor workers, had lower education and belonged to Central and Western tribes compared with their counterparts. Histologically, all tissues except one had suprabasal cleft and acantholytic cells. IHC revealed IgG and C3 intercellularly in the epithelium. CONCLUSIONS: PV was the predominating subtype of pemphigus in this study. The majority of patients with PV presented with oral lesions. Clinical and histological pictures of oral PV are in good agreement with the literature. IHC confirmed all diagnoses of PV.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:D; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/1472-6831-13-66

  4 / 597730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24668927
[Au] Autor:Hattori Y; Falgout L; Lee W; Jung SY; Poon E; Lee JW; Na I; Geisler A; Sadhwani D; Zhang Y; Su Y; Wang X; Liu Z; Xia J; Cheng H; Webb RC; Bonifas AP; Won P; Jeong JW; Jang KI; Song YM; Nardone B; Nodzenski M; Fan JA; Huang Y; West DP; Paller AS; Alam M; Yeo WH; Rogers JA
[Ad] Address:Department of Materials Science and Engineering and Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, 61801, USA.
[Ti] Title:Multifunctional skin-like electronics for quantitative, clinical monitoring of cutaneous wound healing.
[So] Source:Adv Healthc Mater;3(10):1597-607, 2014 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:2192-2659
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Non-invasive, biomedical devices have the potential to provide important, quantitative data for the assessment of skin diseases and wound healing. Traditional methods either rely on qualitative visual and tactile judgments of a professional and/or data obtained using instrumentation with forms that do not readily allow intimate integration with sensitive skin near a wound site. Here, an electronic sensor platform that can softly and reversibly laminate perilesionally at wounds to provide highly accurate, quantitative data of relevance to the management of surgical wound healing is reported. Clinical studies on patients using thermal sensors and actuators in fractal layouts provide precise time-dependent mapping of temperature and thermal conductivity of the skin near the wounds. Analytical and simulation results establish the fundamentals of the sensing modalities, the mechanics of the system, and strategies for optimized design. The use of this type of "epidermal" electronics system in a realistic clinical setting with human subjects establishes a set of practical procedures in disinfection, reuse, and protocols for quantitative measurement. The results have the potential to address important unmet needs in chronic wound management.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/adhm.201400073

  5 / 597730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25297933
[Au] Autor:Krawczyk M; Milkiewicz M; Marschall HU; Bartz C; Grünhage F; Wunsch E; Milkiewicz P; Lammert F
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine II, Saarland University Medical Center, Saarland University, Homburg, Germany....
[Ti] Title:Variant adiponutrin confers genetic protection against cholestatic itch.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;4:6374, 2014.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) mediates cholestatic pruritus. Recently the enzyme PNPLA3, expressed in liver and skin, was demonstrated to metabolise LPA. Here we assess the association of the PNPLA3 variant p.Ile148Met, known to be associated with (non-)alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in genome-wide association studies, with cholestatic itch in 187 patients with primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) and 250 PBC-free controls as well as 201 women with intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (ICP) and 198 female controls without a history of ICP. Our hypothesis was that the intensity of cholestatic itch differs in carriers of distinct PNPLA3 p.Ile148Met genotypes. Patients with PBC carrying the allele p.148Met that confers an increased NAFLD risk reported less itching than carriers of the p.148Ile allele (ANOVA P = 0.048). The PNPLA3 p.148Ile allele increased the odds of requiring plasmapheresis for refractory pruritus (OR = 3.94, 95% CI = 0.91-17.00, P = 0.048). In line with these findings, the PNPLA3 p.148Met allele was underrepresented in the ICP cohort (OR = 0.66, 95% CI = 0.47-0.92, P = 0.013). Notwithstanding the need for further replication of these findings, we conclude that the PNPLA3 allele p.148Met might confer protection against cholestatic pruritus, possibly due to increased LPA-acyltransferase activity in liver and/or skin.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1038/srep06374

  6 / 597730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25298688
[Au] Autor:Han HY; Kim H; Son YH; Lee G; Jeong SH; Ryu MH
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Pathology, School of Dentistry, Institute of Translational Dental Sciences, Gyeongnam, Korea....
[Ti] Title:Anti-cancer effects of Kochia scoparia fruit in human breast cancer cells.
[So] Source:Pharmacogn Mag;10(Suppl 3):S661-7, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0973-1296
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The fruit of Kochia scoparia Scharder is widely used as a medicinal ingredient for the treatment of dysuria and skin diseases in China, Japan and Korea. Especially, K. scoparia had been used for breast masses and chest and flank pain. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the anti-cancer effect of K. scoparia on breast cancer. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We investigated the anti-cancer effects of K. scoparia, methanol extract (MEKS) in vitro. We examined the effects of MEKS on the proliferation rate, cell cycle arrest, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and activation of apoptosis-associated proteins in MDA-MB-231, human breast cancer cells. RESULTS: MTT assay results demonstrated that MEKS decreased the proliferation rates of MDA-MB-231 cells in a dose-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 36.2 µg/ml. MEKS at 25 µg/ml significantly increased the sub-G1 DNA contents of MDA-MB-231 cells to 44.7%, versus untreated cells. In addition, MEKS induced apoptosis by increasing the levels of apoptosis-associated proteins such as cleaved caspase 3, cleaved caspase 8, cleaved caspase 9 and cleaved Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). CONCLUSION: These results suggest that MEKS inhibits cell proliferation and induces apoptosis in breast cancer cells and that MEKS may have potential chemotherapeutic value for the treatment of human breast cancer.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141011
[Lr] Last revision date:141011
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141009
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/0973-1296.139812

  7 / 597730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25298661
[Au] Autor:Kim A; Ma JY
[Ad] Address:Korean Medicine-Based Herbal Drug Development Center Group, Korea Institute of Oriental Medicine, 483 Expo-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-811, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Anti-melanogenic activity of the novel herbal medicine, MA128, through inhibition of tyrosinase activity mediated by the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases and protein kinase signaling pathway in B16F10 cells.
[So] Source:Pharmacogn Mag;10(Suppl 3):S463-71, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:0973-1296
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recently, our research group developed MA128, a novel herbal medicine, and demonstrated that MA128 is effective for the treatment of asthma and atopic dermatitis (AD). In particular, postinflammatory hyper-pigmentation in AD mice was improved with MA128 treatment. Thus, in this study, we determined the effect of MA128 on melanogenesis and its underlying mechanism in murine B16F10 melanoma cells. MATERIALS AND METHODS: After treatment with MA128 at 100 and 250 µg/mL and/or alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH) (1 µM), cellular melanin content and tyrosinase activity in B16F10 cells were measured. Using western blotting, expression levels of tyrosinase, tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), TRP-2, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF), and activation of c-AMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), c-AMP-related element binding protein (CREB) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) were examined. RESULTS: MA128 significantly inhibited melanin synthesis and tyrosinase activity in a resting state as well as α-MSH-stimulating condition, and significantly decreased the expression of tyrosinase, TRP-1, TRP-2 and MITF. In addition, phosphorylation of PKA and CREB by α-MSH stimulation was efficiently blocked by MA128 pretreatment. Moreover, MA128 as an herbal mixture showed synergistic anti-melanogenic effects compared with each single constituent herb. CONCLUSION: MA128 showed anti-melanogenic activity through inhibition of tyrosinase activity mediated by p38 MAPK and PKA signaling pathways in B16F10 cells. These results suggest that MA128 may be useful as an herbal medicine for controlling hyper-pigmentation and as a skin-whitening agent.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141011
[Lr] Last revision date:141011
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141009
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/0973-1296.139774

  8 / 597730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25298729
[Au] Autor:Kumar S; Kumar V; Kumar S; Kumar S
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, King George's Medical University, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India....
[Ti] Title:Management strategy for facial venous malformations.
[So] Source:Natl J Maxillofac Surg;5(1):93-6, 2014 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0975-5950
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Venous malformations (VMs) are slow-flow vascular malformations, caused by abnormalities in the development of the veins. Venous malformations vary in size and location within the body. When the skin or tissues just under the skin are affected, they appear as slightly blue-colored skin stains or swellings. These can vary in size from time to time because of swelling within the malformation. As these are vascular malformations, they are present at birth and grow proportionately with the child. Venous malformations can be very small to large in size, and sometimes, can involve a significant area within the body, When the venous malformation is well localized, this may cause localized swelling, however, when the venous malformation is more extensive, there may be more widespread swelling of the affected body part. Some patients with venous malformations have abnormal blood clotting within the malformation. Most venous malformations cause no life-threatening problems for patients. Some venous malformations cause repeated pain due to intermittent swelling and congestion of the malformation or due to the formation of blood clots within the malformation. Rarely, venous malformations may be part of a syndrome (an association of several clinically recognizable features) or be linked to an underlying genetic abnormality. We present 12 cases of venous malformations of the head and neck area, which have been managed at our hospital.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141011
[Lr] Last revision date:141011
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141009
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/0975-5950.140188

  9 / 597730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25298910
[Au] Autor:Lee HL; Cho SY; Lee DG; Ko Y; Hyun JI; Kim BK; Seo JH; Lee JW; Lee S
[Ad] Address:Department of Internal Medicine, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea....
[Ti] Title:A Fatal Spontaneous Gas Gangrene due to Clostridium perfringens during Neutropenia of Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation: Case Report and Literature Review.
[So] Source:Infect Chemother;46(3):199-203, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2093-2340
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Most cases of gas gangrene caused by Clostridium species begin with trauma-related injuries but in rare cases, spontaneous gas gangrene (SGG) can occur when patients have conditions such as advanced malignancy, diabetes, or immunosuppression. Clostridium perfringens, a rare cause of SGG, exists as normal flora of skin and intestines of human. Adequate antibiotics with surgical debridement of infected tissue is the only curative therapeutic management. Mortality rate among adults is reported range of 67-100% and majority of deaths are occurred within 24 hours of onset. We experienced a case of SGG on the trunk, buttock and thigh in a neutropenic patient with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. His clinical course was rapid and fatal during pre-engraftment neutropenic period of allogeneic stem cell transplantation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141011
[Lr] Last revision date:141011
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141009
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3947/ic.2014.46.3.199

  10 / 597730 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25298906
[Au] Autor:Yoon YK; Kim ES; Hur J; Lee S; Kim SW; Cheong JW; Choo EJ; Kim HB
[Ad] Address:Division of Infectious Diseases, Department of Internal Medicine, Korea University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea....
[Ti] Title:Oral Antimicrobial Therapy: Efficacy and Safety for Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infections and Its Impact on the Length of Hospital Stay.
[So] Source:Infect Chemother;46(3):172-81, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:2093-2340
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Carefully switching from intravenous to oral antibiotic therapy has shown to reduce treatment costs and lengths of hospital stay as well as increase safety and comfort in patients with infections. The aim of this study was to compare the clinical efficacy and safety between the patients treated with glycopeptides (case group), and the patients given oral antibiotics, as the initial or step-down therapy (control group), in the treatment of patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A multicenter observational study was retrospectively performed in 7 teaching hospitals in Korea from January to December 2012. The study included adult patients (≥ 18 years) with infection caused by MRSA isolates, susceptible to clindamycin, erythromycin, and ciprofloxacin. The primary end point was treatment outcome, including all-cause mortality and switching of antibiotics. Drug-related adverse events and the lengths of hospital stay were also compared between the two treatment groups. RESULTS: During the study period, 107 patients (43 cases and 64 controls) with MRSA infections were enrolled from the participating hospitals. The most common sites of MRSA infection were skin and soft tissue (n = 28) and bone and joint (n = 26). The median Charlson comorbidity index (P = 0. 560), the frequency of severe sepsis (P = 0.682) or thrombocytopenia (P = 1.000), and median level of serum C-reactive protein (P = 0.157) at the onset of MRSA infections were not significantly different between the case and control groups. The oral antibiotics most frequently prescribed in the case group, were fluoroquinolones (n = 29) and clindamycin (n = 8). The median duration of antibiotic treatment (P = 0.090) and the occurrence of drug-related adverse events (P = 0.460) did not reach statistically significant difference between the two groups, whereas the total length of hospital stay after the onset of MRSA infection was significantly shorter in the case group than the control group [median (interquartile range), 23 days (8-41) vs. 32 days (15-54), P = 0.017]. In multivariate analyses, the type of antibiotic used was not an independent risk factor for treatment failure. The statistically significant factors associated with treatment failure included underlying hepatic diseases, prior receipt of antibiotics, and foreign body retention. CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that oral antibiotic therapy with active agents against MRSA isolates can be considered as the initial or step-down therapy for the treatment of MRSA infections and also reduce the length of hospital stay.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1410
[Cu] Class update date: 141011
[Lr] Last revision date:141011
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141009
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3947/ic.2014.46.3.172


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