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[PMID]: 26048519
[Au] Autor:Shabino PJ; Khoraki J; Elegbede AF; Schmocker RK; Nabozny MJ; Funk LM; Greenberg JA; Campos GM
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Division of General Surgery, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin....
[Ti] Title:Reduction of surgical site infections after laparoscopic gastric bypass with circular stapled gastrojejunostomy.
[So] Source:Surg Obes Relat Dis;12(1):4-9, 2016 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1878-7533
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Circular stapled gastrojejunostomy (GJ) is favored by many surgeons during laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB). However, it has been associated with higher rates of surgical site infection (SSI). OBJECTIVES: To study the impact of introducing standard technical modifications (intervention) on the incidence of SSI after LRYGB with circular stapled GJ. SETTING: Tertiary academic medical center. METHODS: Consecutive patients who underwent primary LRYGB between May 2010 and September 2014 were separated into preintervention and postintervention cohorts. The intervention consisted of the use of a stapler cover, wound irrigation, antibiotic application to the wound, and primary wound closure. Predictor variables studied included patient demographic characteristics, the intervention, and other operative and perioperative factors. The primary outcome studied was SSI. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to determine factors independently associated with SSI. RESULTS: Three hundred thirty patients underwent LRYGB (preintervention n = 200, postintervention n = 130). Patients' characteristics were similar in both groups. A 21-mm stapler and chlorhexidine-based skin preparation were more frequently used in the postintervention group. SSI rate decreased from 15% to 3.8% (P<.01) after the intervention. On multivariate analysis, the intervention (OR .28, 95% CI .09-0.86, P = .026), use of chlorhexidine-based prep (OR .37, 95%CI .15-.93, P = .034), and maintenance of patient temperature (OR .47 95%CI .26-0.85, P = .012) were independently associated with reduced SSI rates. CONCLUSION: Use of a stapler cover, wound irrigation, wound antibiotic application, and primary wound closure were associated with a significantly lower wound infection rate after LRYGB with the circular stapled GJ. The observed SSI rates after our intervention are similar to those reported after hand-sewn and linear stapled techniques. In addition, other factors associated with decreasing the likelihood of developing SSI were use of chlorhexidine-based prep and maintaining intraoperative normothermia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  2 / 632235 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26617291
[Au] Autor:Hello M; Aubert H; Bernier C; Néel A; Barbarot S
[Ad] Address:Dermatologie, nouvelles cliniques nantaises, 44277 Nantes, France....
[Ti] Title:Dermatite atopique de l'adulte. [Atopic dermatitis of the adult].
[So] Source:Rev Med Interne;37(2):91-9, 2016 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1768-3122
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Atopic dermatitis (AD) of the adult is a common skin disease. Its prevalence has greatly increased during the past decades. AD is commonly associated with other atopic disorders. Its impact on quality of life is often underestimated. Various immunopathologic mechanisms are involved in AD: innate epidermal barrier dysfunction due to filaggrin gene mutations, innate and adaptative abnormalities of the immune system (an initial Th2 phase precedes a chronic Th1 phase), intestinal and cutaneous microbiomes dysbiosis, and environmental factors. Diagnosis of AD is clinical and there is no predictive biomarker of future severity. The main differential diagnoses are: scabies, psoriasis, cutaneous adverse reaction, cutaneous T cell lymphoma, primary immunodeficiency, and Netherton's syndrome. Therapeutic management is challenging and should integrate a therapeutic education program. Topical corticosteroids are the first line treatment, including a preliminary assessment of possible topical corticosteroids phobia. Systemic treatments are recommended in severe, chronic and resistant AD, after careful evaluation in a reference centre. Dupilumab, an IL4/IL13 inhibitor, might be the first effective targeted therapy in AD, whereas therapies that specifically target the mechanisms of pruritus represent an exciting perspective.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 632235 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26802885
[Au] Autor:Reto Valiente L; Pichilingue Reto C; Pichilingue Prieto O; Dolores Cerna K
[Ad] Address:Hospital Hipólito Unanue. Lima, Perú....
[Ti] Title:Tuberculosis abdominal en niños y adolescentes. Un desafío diagnóstico. [Abdominal Tuberculosis in children and adolescents. A diagnostic challenge].
[So] Source:Rev Gastroenterol Peru;35(4):318-22, 2015 Oct-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1609-722X
[Cp] Country of publication:Peru
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To present our experience with abdominal tuberculosis in children and adolescents treated in our hospital from 2003 - 2014. MATERIAL AND METHODS: It is a retrospective study. We have collected clinical records of inpatients <20 years old who were admitted at Hipolito Unanue Hospital from January 2003 to July 2014, with diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis. RESULTS: Among the overall 30 patients, 16 (53.33%) were female and 14 (46.67%) were male. The mean age of all patients was 16.5 years. The most common clinical features were abdominal pain in 29 (96.67%), fever in 26 (86.67%), ascites in 23 (76.67%) and loss of weight in 21 (70%). 63.33% of the patients were eutrophics, 13.34% were overweight or obese and only 23.33% suffered of malnutrition. TB contact was present in 10 (33.33%). Positive tuberculin skin tests were seen in 10%. Extra-abdominal tuberculosis was found in 22 patients (63.32%). 12 cases had coexisting pulmonary tuberculosis and 4 cases had pleural effusion. 12 patients (40%) had tuberculous peritonitis; 12 patients (40%) had intestinal tuberculosis and peritoneal tuberculosis and 4 patients (13.33%) had intestinal tuberculosis. Bacteriological confirmation of tuberculosis was achieved in 10 cases (33.33%). Antituberculous therapy for 6 months was effective in 29 cases. One patient died who multifocal tuberculosis with HIV had associated. CONCLUSIONS: Abdominal tuberculosis is seen in 4.37% of children affected with tuberculosis, of which over 63% will have extra abdominal manifestations. Abdominal tuberculosis should be considered in patients with abdominal pain, fever, weight loss and abnormal chest radiography. Imaging can be useful for early diagnosis of abdominal tuberculosis.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  4 / 632235 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26802941
[Au] Autor:Kiraly AJ; Soliman E; Jenkins A; Van Dross RT
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmacology & Toxicology, Brody School of Medicine, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC, USA....
[Ti] Title:Apigenin inhibits COX-2, PGE2, and EP1 and also initiates terminal differentiation in the epidermis of tumor bearing mice.
[So] Source:Prostaglandins Leukot Essent Fatty Acids;104:44-53, 2016 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2823
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is the most prevalent cancer in the United States. NMSC overexpresses cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). COX-2 synthesizes prostaglandins such as PGE2 which promote proliferation and tumorigenesis by engaging G-protein-coupled prostaglandin E receptors (EP). Apigenin is a bioflavonoid that blocks mouse skin tumorigenesis induced by the chemical carcinogens, 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA). However, the effect of apigenin on the COX-2 pathway has not been examined in the DMBA/TPA skin tumor model. In the present study, apigenin decreased tumor multiplicity and incidence in DMBA/TPA-treated SKH-1 mice. Analysis of the non-tumor epidermis revealed that apigenin reduced COX-2, PGE2, EP1, and EP2 synthesis and also increased terminal differentiation. In contrast, apigenin did not inhibit the COX-2 pathway or promote terminal differentiation in the tumors. Since fewer tumors developed in apigenin-treated animals which contained reduced epidermal COX-2 levels, our data suggest that apigenin may avert skin tumor development by blocking COX-2.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 632235 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26709201
[Au] Autor:Hehar H; Mychasiuk R
[Ad] Address:Alberta Children's Hospital Research Foundation, University of Calgary, Faculty of Medicine, Calgary, AB, Canada.
[Ti] Title:The use of telomere length as a predictive biomarker for injury prognosis in juvenile rats following a concussion/mild traumatic brain injury.
[So] Source:Neurobiol Dis;87:11-8, 2016 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1095-953X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Telomeres were originally believed to be passive players in cellular replication, but recent research has highlighted their more active role in epigenetic patterning and promotion of cellular growth and survival. Furthermore, literature demonstrates that telomere length (TL) is responsive to environmental manipulations such as prenatal stress and dietary programming. As the search for a prognostic biomarker of concussion has had limited success, this study sought to examine whether or not telomere length (TL) could be an efficacious predictor of symptom severity in juvenile rats following concussion. Rats from four distinct experimental groups (caloric restriction (CR), high fat diet (HFD), exercise (EX), and standard controls (STD)) received a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI)/concussion and were then subjected to a behavioural test battery. The test battery was scored and the animals were categorized as poor, average, or good, based on their performance on the 6 tests examined. Skin cells (from ear notch samples) were taken 17days post-injury and DNA was extracted for telomere length analysis. Ear notch skin cell TL was highly correlated with brain tissue TL for a given individual. Animals in the CR and EX cohorts had significantly longer telomeres, while animals in the HFD cohort had significantly shorter telomeres, when compared to controls. The mTBI/concussion reduced TL in all cohorts except the EX group. A significant linear relationship was found between TL and performance on the behavioural test battery, whereby shorter telomeres were associated with poorer performance and longer telomeres with better performance. As performance on the test battery is linked to symptom severity, this study found TL to be a reasonable tool for concussion prognosis. Future studies with human populations should examine the validity of TL in peripheral cells, as a predictor of concussion pathology.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 632235 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26802637
[Au] Autor:Irvin EJ; Miller HD
[Ti] Title:Emollient Use in the Term Newborn: A Literature Review.
[So] Source:Neonatal Netw;34(4):227-30, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1539-2880
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The skin of a term newborn differs both from preterm skin and that of an adult, and there is currently little consensus on the proper use of emollients in this population. The focus of most published literature is on preterm skin and the use of bathing products, with limited information regarding emollient use. Intact skin is the first line of defense against infection, allergens, and dehydration, and dry and compromised skin puts the infant at greater risk of harm from the aforementioned complications. Emollients are part of the front-line treatment for atopic dermatitis (AD), and, with the incidence of AD on the rise, it is imperative that further research be conducted to provide a guide for clinical practice.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:N
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1891/0730-0832.34.4.227

  7 / 632235 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26802635
[Au] Autor:Colwell A
[Ti] Title:To Bathe or Not to Bathe: The Neonatal Question.
[So] Source:Neonatal Netw;34(4):216-9, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1539-2880
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:After delivery, newborns go through a series of physiologic changes in an effort to adapt to extrauterine life, with preterm newborns more likely to experience medical problems following this transition. Neonatal hypothermia, defined as a temperature <36.5°C, is a major contributor to neonatal mortality and morbidity. Early bathing may be a contributing factor to hypothermia and interfere with the premature neonate's ability to safely adapt to an extrauterine environment. Skin physiology, the physiologic changes that result from bathing, the importance of maintaining vernix for temperature stability, and how policy change and education-based programs for developmentally supportive care will be discussed in an attempt to improve patient care outcomes for neonates in the NICU.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:N
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1891/0730-0832.34.4.216

  8 / 632235 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26803094
[Au] Autor:Scheans P
[Ti] Title:Neonatal Pressure Ulcer Prevention.
[So] Source:Neonatal Netw;34(2):126-32, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:1539-2880
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The incidence of pressure ulcers in acutely ill infants and children ranges up to 27 percent in intensive care units, with a range of 16-19 percent in NICUs. Anatomic, physiologic, and developmental factors place ill and preterm newborns at risk for skin breakdown. Two case studies illustrate these factors, and best practices for pressure ulcer prevention are described.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:N
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1891/0730-0832.34.2.126

  9 / 632235 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26228257
[Au] Autor:Balbuena Segura AI; Corrales Fernández MJ; Gea Velázquez de Castro MT
[Ad] Address:Servicio de Medicina Preventiva y Calidad Asistencial, Hospital Universitari Sant Joan d'Alacant, Sant Joan d'Alacant, Alicante, España. Electronic address: balbuena_ana@gva.es.
[Ti] Title:Infección cutánea por Staphylococcus aureus resistente a meticilina de origen comunitario con transmisión intrafamiliar. [Skin infection by community-acquired methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus with familial transmission].
[So] Source:Med Clin (Barc);146(3):139-40, 2016 Feb 5.
[Is] ISSN:0025-7753
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:spa
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 632235 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26802242
[Au] Autor:Mollo MR; Antonini D; Cirillo L; Missero C
[Ad] Address:CEINGE Biotecnologie Avanzate, Scarl, Napoli, Italy....
[Ti] Title:Research Techniques Made Simple: Skin Carcinogenesis Models: Xenotransplantation Techniques.
[So] Source:J Invest Dermatol;136(2):e13-7, 2016 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1523-1747
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Xenotransplantation is a widely used technique to test the tumorigenic potential of human cells in vivo using immunodeficient mice. Here we describe basic technologies and recent advances in xenotransplantation applied to study squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) of the skin. SCC cells isolated from tumors can either be cultured to generate a cell line or injected directly into mice. Several immunodeficient mouse models are available for selection based on the experimental design and the type of tumorigenicity assay. Subcutaneous injection is the most widely used technique for xenotransplantation because it involves a simple procedure allowing the use of a large number of cells, although it may not mimic the original tumor environment. SCC cell injections at the epidermal-to-dermal junction or grafting of organotypic cultures containing human stroma have also been used to more closely resemble the tumor environment. Mixing of SCC cells with cancer-associated fibroblasts can allow the study of their interaction and reciprocal influence, which can be followed in real time by intradermal ear injection using conventional fluorescent microscopy. In this article, we will review recent advances in xenotransplantation technologies applied to study behavior of SCC cells and their interaction with the tumor environment in vivo.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1601
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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