Database : MEDLINE
Search on : spinal and puncture [Words]
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[PMID]: 29420792
[Au] Autor:Vassal O; Del Carmine P; Desgranges FP; Bouvet L; Lilot M; Gadot N; Timour-Chah Q; Chassard D
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesia, Hôpital Femme Mere Enfants (Hospices Civils de Lyon), Lyon, France.
[Ti] Title:Assessment of Neurological Toxicity of Hydroxyethyl Starch 130/0.4 Injected in the Intrathecal Space in Rats.
[So] Source:Pain Med;, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1526-4637
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: Epidural blood patch is the procedure of choice to relieve postdural puncture headache. Hydroxyethyl-starch (HES) has been proposed as a patch in some circumstances such as in the case of hematological disease due to the theoretical risk of neoplastic seeding to the central nervous system. Acute neurological HES toxicity has been excluded by a previous animal study, but the long-term neurological toxicity has not been evaluated. Methods: Rats were randomly assigned to one of three groups: no intrathecal injection, 20 µL of intrathecal saline, or a 20-µL intrathecal HES (6% hydroxyethyl starch 130/0.4) administered via a cervical puncture. Clinical daily rat activity was measured before and after dural puncture by actinometry. The rats were killed at day 28, and the spinal cord was surgically removed and stained with hematoxylin-phloxine-saffron for gross and microscopic examination. Results: Eleven rats underwent dural puncture without injection, 11 were injected with normal saline, and 12 received intrathecal HES. No clinical or actimetric changes (total distance traveled, number of direction changes, and number of rearings) were observed up to one month after injection. Nonspecific histopathological changes were equally observed in all groups. Conclusions: The results of the current study indicate that intrathecal injection of HES in rats does not induce any clinical or histopathological evidence of long-term neuronal toxicity. Further safety studies in animals are warranted before HES might be considered a safe alternative to the classic epidural blood patch.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/pm/pny005

  2 / 9014 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29500813
[Au] Autor:Akhtar RS; Licata JP; Luk KC; Shaw LM; Trojanowski JQ; Lee VM
[Ad] Address:Center for Neurodegenerative Disease Research and Institute on Aging, PA, 19104-3339, USA.
[Ti] Title:Measurements of auto-antibodies to α-synuclein in the serum and cerebral spinal fluids of patients with Parkinson's disease.
[So] Source:J Neurochem;, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1471-4159
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Biomarkers for α-synuclein are needed for diagnosis and prognosis in Parkinson's disease (PD). Endogenous auto-antibodies to α-synuclein could serve as biomarkers for underlying synucleinopathy, but previous assessments of auto-antibodies have shown variability and inconsistent clinical correlations. We hypothesized that auto-antibodies to α-synuclein could be diagnostic for PD and explain its clinical heterogeneity. To test this hypothesis, we developed an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for measuring α-synuclein auto-antibodies in human samples. We evaluated 69 serum samples (16 healthy controls (HC) and 53 PD patients) and 145 CSF samples (52 HC and 93 PD patients) from our Institution. Both serum and CSF were available for 24 participants. Males had higher auto-antibody levels than females in both fluids. CSF auto-antibody levels were significantly higher in PD patients as compared to HC, whereas serum levels were not significantly different. CSF auto-antibody levels did not associate with amyloid-ß , total tau, or phosphorylated tau. CSF auto-antibody levels correlated with performance on the Montreal Cognitive Assessment, even when controlled for CSF amyloidß . CSF hemoglobin levels, as a proxy for contamination of CSF by blood during lumbar puncture, did not influence these observations. Using recombinant α-synuclein with N- and C-terminal truncations, we found that CSF auto-antibodies target amino acids 100 through 120 of α-synuclein. We conclude that endogenous CSF auto-antibodies are significantly higher in PD patients as compared to HC, suggesting that they could indicate the presence of underlying synucleinopathy. These auto-antibodies associate with poor cognition, independently of CSF amyloidß ., and target a select C-terminal region of α-synuclein. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jnc.14330

  3 / 9014 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29460012
[Au] Autor:Miyazaki S; Diwan AD; Kato K; Cheng K; Bae WC; Sun Y; Yamada J; Muehleman C; Lenz ME; Inoue N; Sah RL; Kawakami M; Masuda K
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of California-San Diego, 9500 Gilman Dr., MC0863, La Jolla, CA, 92093-0863, USA.
[Ti] Title:ISSLS PRIZE IN BASIC SCIENCE 2018: Growth differentiation factor-6 attenuated pro-inflammatory molecular changes in the rabbit anular-puncture model and degenerated disc-induced pain generation in the rat xenograft radiculopathy model.
[So] Source:Eur Spine J;, 2018 Feb 19.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0932
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To elucidate the effects of growth differentiation factor-6 (GDF6) on: (i) gene expression of inflammatory/pain-related molecules and structural integrity in the rabbit intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration model, and (ii) sensory dysfunction and changes in pain-marker expression in dorsal nerve ganglia (DRGs) in the rat xenograft radiculopathy model. METHODS: Forty-six adolescent rabbits received anular-puncture in two non-consecutive lumbar IVDs. Four weeks later, phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or GDF6 (1, 10 or 100 µg) was injected into the nucleus pulposus (NP) of punctured discs and followed for 4 weeks for gene expression analysis and 12 weeks for structural analyses. For pain assessment, eight rabbits were sacrificed at 4 weeks post-injection and NP tissues of injected discs were transplanted onto L5 DRGs of 16 nude rats to examine mechanical allodynia. The rat DRGs were analyzed immunohistochemically. RESULTS: In GDF6-treated rabbit NPs, gene expressions of interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, vascular endothelial growth factor, prostaglandin-endoperoxide synthase 2, and nerve growth factor were significantly lower than those in the PBS group. GDF6 injections resulted in partial restoration of disc height and improvement of MRI disc degeneration grades with statistical significance in rabbit structural analyses. Allodynia induced by xenograft transplantation of rabbit degenerated NPs onto rat DRGs was significantly reduced by GDF6 injection. Staining intensities for ionized calcium-binding adaptor molecule-1 and calcitonin gene-related peptide in rat DRGs of the GDF6 group were significantly lower than those of the PBS group. CONCLUSION: GDF6 injection may change the pathological status of degenerative discs and attenuate degenerated IVD-induced pain.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00586-018-5488-1

  4 / 9014 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29366770
[Au] Autor:Vaquero J; Zurita M; Rico MA; Aguayo C; Fernández C; Gutiérrez R; Rodríguez-Boto G; Saab A; Hassan R; Ortega C
[Ad] Address:Service of Neurosurgery, Puerta de Hierro-Majadahonda Hospital, Autonomous University, Madrd, Spain. Electronic address: jvaqueroc@telefonica.net.
[Ti] Title:Intrathecal administration of autologous bone marrow stromal cells improves neuropathic pain in patients with spinal cord injury.
[So] Source:Neurosci Lett;670:14-18, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7972
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Neuropathic pain (NP) is highly disabling, responds poorly to pharmacological treatment, and represents a significant cause of decreased quality of life in patients suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI). In recent years, cell therapy with autologous mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) has been considered as a potential therapeutic weapon in this entity. Ten patients suffering chronic SCI received 100 million MSCs into subarachnoid space by lumbar puncture (month 1 of the study) and this procedure was repeated at months 4 and 7 until reaching a total doses of 300 million MSCs. Intensity of NP was measured by standard numerical rating scale (VAS) from 0 to 10, recording scores previous to the first MSCs administration and monthly, until month 10 of follow-up. Months 1, 4, 7 and 10 of the study were selected as time points in order to a statistical analysis by the nonparametric Wilcoxon rank test. Our results showed significant and progressive improvement in NP intensity after the first administration of MSCs (p: 0.003). This study supports the benefit of intrathecal administration of autologous MSCs for the treatment of NP in patients with SCI.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 9014 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29479039
[Au] Autor:Ichinose D; Tochigi S; Tanaka T; Suzuki T; Takei J; Hatano K; Kajiwara I; Maruyama F; Sakamoto H; Hasegawa Y; Tani S; Murayama Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Jikei University Kashiwa Hospital.
[Ti] Title:Concomitant Intracranial and Lumbar Chronic Subdural Hematoma Treated by Fluoroscopic Guided Lumbar Puncture: A Case Report and Literature Review.
[So] Source:Neurol Med Chir (Tokyo);, 2018 Feb 23.
[Is] ISSN:1349-8029
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A 40-year-old man presented with a severe headache, lower back pain, and lower abdominal pain 1 month after a head injury caused by falling. Computed tomography (CT) of the head demonstrated bilateral chronic subdural hematoma (CSDH) with a significant amount in the left frontoparietal region. At the same time, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine also revealed CSDH from L2 to S1 level. A simple drainage for the intracranial CSDH on the left side was performed. Postoperatively, the headache was improved; however, the lower back and abdominal pain persisted. Aspiration of the liquefied spinal subdural hematoma was performed by a lumbar puncture under fluoroscopic guidance. The clinical symptoms were dramatically improved postoperatively. Concomitant intracranial and spinal CSDH is considerably rare so only 23 cases including the present case have been reported in the literature so far. The etiology and therapeutic strategy were discussed with a review of the literature. Therapeutic strategy is not established for these two concomitant lesions. Conservative follow-up was chosen for 14 cases, resulting in a favorable clinical outcome. Although surgical evacuation of lumbosacral CSDH was performed in seven cases, an alteration of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure following spinal surgery should be reminded because of the intracranial lesion. Since CSDH is well liquefied in both intracranial and spinal lesion, a less invasive approach is recommended not only for an intracranial lesion but also for spinal lesion. Fluoroscopic-guided lumbar puncture for lumbosacral CSDH following burr hole surgery for intracranial CSDH could be a recommended strategy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180226
[Lr] Last revision date:180226
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2176/nmc.cr.2017-0177

  6 / 9014 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29468441
[Au] Autor:De Coster O; Forget P; Moens M; Matic M; Choustoulakis L; Poelaert J
[Ad] Address:Pain Clinic, Algemeen Ziekenhuis Delta (AZ Delta), Roeselare, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:A new minimally invasive technique for lead revision of perc-paddle leads.
[So] Source:Acta Neurochir (Wien);, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:0942-0940
[Cp] Country of publication:Austria
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To report on a less-invasive technique for replacing a broken lead in a spinal cord stimulation (SCS) device that makes use of St. Jude Medical's "Epiducer" device. A 53-year-old woman suffered a loss of stimulation on her internal pulse generator (IPG), which was found to have a broken lead. The broken lead was withdrawn using the Epiducer device with minimal invasiveness and without pain. A new lead was put in place, and successful stimulation using the IPG resumed. Follow-up 3 weeks later showed a well-functioning SCS system. An Epiducer can be used to revise the SCS system in a minimal invasive way without a new puncture. Follow-up study of this technique as well as others for revising an SCS system should be encouraged and used in comparison study.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00701-018-3500-5

  7 / 9014 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29455477
[Au] Autor:Jin YH; Shi SY; Zheng Q; Shen J; Ying XZ; Wang YF
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedics, Integrated Chinese and Western Medicine Hospital of Zhejiang Chinese Medical University, Hangzhou 310003, Zhejiang, China.
[Ti] Title:[Application value of Xpert MTB/RIF in diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis and detection of rifampin resistance].
[So] Source:Zhongguo Gu Shang;30(9):787-791, 2017 Sep 25.
[Is] ISSN:1003-0034
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the application value of Xpert MTB/RIF in diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis and detection of rifampin resistance. METHODS: The 109 pus specimens were obtained from patients who were primaryly diagnosed as spinal tuberculosis. All of the pus specimens were detected by acid-fast stain, liquid fast culturing by BACTEC MGIT 960 and Xpert MTB/RIF assay to definite the differences in sensitivity and specificity of mycobacterium tuberculosis among detecting methods. Pus specimens obtained by different methods were deteceded by MTB/RIF test to analyze the self-influence on Xpert MTB/RIF test. The result of liquid fast culturing by BACTEC MGIT 960 was used as the gold standard; and the value of Xpert MTB/RIF assay in detecting rifampin resistance was analyzed. RESULTS: The sensitivity of acid-fast stain, liquid fast culturing by BACTEC MGIT 960 and Xpert MTB/RIF assay were 25.92%, 48.15%, 77.78%, respectively. The sensitivity of pus specimens obtained from open surgery, ultrasound positioning puncture and biopsy the sensitivity were 83.78%, 76.47%, 44.68% respectively deteceded by MTB/RIF test. According to the gold standard of the results of liquid fast culturing by BACTEC MGIT 960 assay, the sensitivity and specificity of Xpert MTB/RIF assay in detecting rifampin resistance were 80%(4/5) and 90.70%(39/43), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Xpert MTB/RIF assay has higher value in diagnosis of spinal tuberculosi, and also can detect rifampin resistance. The number of mycobacterium tuberculosis in pus specimens has a great influence in the sensitivity of Xpert MTB/RIF assay.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180218
[Lr] Last revision date:180218
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3969/j.issn.1003-0034.2017.09.002

  8 / 9014 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29452686
[Au] Autor:Costerus JM; Brouwer MC; van de Beek D
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Academic Medical Center, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam Neuroscience, Amsterdam, Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Technological advances and changing indications for lumbar puncture in neurological disorders.
[So] Source:Lancet Neurol;17(3):268-278, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1474-4465
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Technological advances have changed the indications for and the way in which lumbar puncture is done. Suspected CNS infection remains the most common indication for lumbar puncture, but new molecular techniques have broadened CSF analysis indications, such as the determination of neuronal autoantibodies in autoimmune encephalitis. New screening techniques have increased sensitvity for pathogen detection and can be used to identify pathogens that were previously unknown to cause CNS infections. Evidence suggests that potential treatments for neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease, will rely on early detection of the disease with the use of CSF biomarkers. In addition to being used as a diagnostic tool, lumbar puncture can also be used to administer intrathecal treatments as shown by studies of antisense oligonucleotides in patients with spinal muscular atrophy. Lumbar puncture is generally a safe procedure but complications can occur, ranging from minor (eg, back pain) to potentially devastating (eg, cerebral herniation). Evidence that an atraumatic needle tip design reduces complications of lumbar puncture is compelling, and reinforces the need to change clinical practice.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180217
[Lr] Last revision date:180217
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  9 / 9014 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28449906
[Au] Autor:Lancien M; Inocente CO; Dauvilliers Y; Kugener B; Scholz S; Raverot V; Lin JS; Guyon A; Gustin MP; Franco P
[Ad] Address:Integrative Physiology of Brain Arousal System, CRNL, INSERM-U1028, CNRS UMR5292, University Lyon 1, Lyon, France.
[Ti] Title:Low cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin levels during sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) risk period.
[So] Source:Sleep Med;33:57-60, 2017 May.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5506
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The temporal association between sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and sleep suggests that the arousability from sleep provides a protective mechanism for survival. Recently, the hypocretin system, which promotes wakefulness, has been implicated in SIDS, since it has been reported that SIDS victims have fewer hypocretin neurons than infants who have died from other causes. To understand the role of hypocretin in SIDS, it is essential to better understand how this system matures. The present study compared cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin in children aged 2-6 months, which is the age of peak incidence for SIDS, to both younger and older children. METHOD: Hypocretin levels were measured in CSF samples from 101 children who underwent a clinically relevant lumbar puncture. Children were separated into five age groups: 0-2 months, 2-6 months, 1-5 years, 5-10 years, and 10-18 years. RESULTS: Hypocretin levels were not significantly different between 1-5 years, 5-10 years, and 10-18 years. Therefore, these three groups were pooled into a single one (1-18 years) for further analysis. Between the 0-2 month, 2-6 month, and 1-18 year groups, a significant difference in CSF hypocretin levels existed (p = 0.001). Simple comparisons showed that CSF hypocretin levels in the 2-6 month age group were significantly lower than hypocretin levels in both the 0-2 month and 1-18 year group (p < 0.001 and p = 0.008, respectively), but not significantly between 0-2 month and 1-18 year children. CONCLUSIONS: The CSF hypocretin levels were lower at the age of peak incidence for SIDS. This could underlie an increased vulnerability to SIDS at this specific age.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Orexins/analysis
Sleep/physiology
Sudden Infant Death/cerebrospinal fluid
Wakefulness/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Humans
Incidence
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Male
Spinal Puncture/methods
Sudden Infant Death/epidemiology
Sudden Infant Death/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (HCRT protein, human); 0 (Orexins)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180216
[Lr] Last revision date:180216
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 9014 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29444239
[Au] Autor:Hu HZ; Granger N; Pai SB; Bellamkonda RV; Jeffery ND
[Ad] Address:College of Veterinary Medicine, Iowa State University, 1800 Christensen Drive, Ames IA 50011, USA.
[Ti] Title:Therapeutic efficacy of microtube-embedded chondroitinase ABC in a canine clinical model of spinal cord injury.
[So] Source:Brain;, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2156
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Many hundreds of thousands of people around the world are living with the long-term consequences of spinal cord injury and they need effective new therapies. Laboratory research in experimental animals has identified a large number of potentially translatable interventions but transition to the clinic is not straightforward. Further evidence of efficacy in more clinically-relevant lesions is required to gain sufficient confidence to commence human clinical trials. Of the many therapeutic candidates currently available, intraspinally applied chondroitinase ABC has particularly well documented efficacy in experimental animals. In this study we measured the effects of this intervention in a double-blinded randomized controlled trial in a cohort of dogs with naturally-occurring severe chronic spinal cord injuries that model the condition in humans. First, we collected baseline data on a series of outcomes: forelimb-hindlimb coordination (the prespecified primary outcome measure), skin sensitivity along the back, somatosensory evoked and transcranial magnetic motor evoked potentials and cystometry in 60 dogs with thoracolumbar lesions. Dogs were then randomized 1:1 to receive intraspinal injections of heat-stabilized, lipid microtube-embedded chondroitinase ABC or sham injections consisting of needle puncture of the skin. Outcome data were measured at 1, 3 and 6 months after intervention; skin sensitivity was also measured 24 h after injection (or sham). Forelimb-hindlimb coordination was affected by neither time nor chondroitinase treatment alone but there was a significant interaction between these variables such that coordination between forelimb and hindlimb stepping improved during the 6-month follow-up period in the chondroitinase-treated animals by a mean of 23%, but did not change in controls. Three dogs (10%) in the chondroitinase group also recovered the ability to ambulate without assistance. Sensitivity of the dorsal skin increased at 24 h after intervention in both groups but subsequently decreased to normal levels. Cystometry identified a non-significant improvement of bladder compliance at 1 month in the chondroitinase-injected dogs but this did not persist. There were no overall differences between groups in detection of sensory evoked potentials. Our results strongly support a beneficial effect of intraspinal injection of chondroitinase ABC on spinal cord function in this highly clinically-relevant model of chronic severe spinal cord injury. There was no evidence of long-term adverse effects associated with this intervention. We therefore conclude that this study provides strong evidence in support of initiation of clinical trials of chondroitinase ABC in humans with chronic spinal cord injury.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/brain/awy007


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