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[PMID]: 29523963
[Au] Autor:Hagino H; Soen S; Sugimoto T; Endo N; Okazaki R; Tanaka K; Nakamura T
[Ad] Address:School of Health Science, Tottori University Faculty of Medicine, 86 Nishi-cho, Yonago, Tottori, 683-8503, Japan. hagino@med.tottori-u.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Changes in quality of life in patients with postmenopausal osteoporosis receiving weekly bisphosphonate treatment: a 2-year multicenter study in Japan.
[So] Source:J Bone Miner Metab;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1435-5604
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We investigated changes in quality of life (QOL), including pain, in Japanese women aged≥55years who were diagnosed as having osteoporosis at 265 centers across Japan and treated continuously with once-weekly bisphosphonates for 24months. In 2650 evaluable patients, a significant improvement in QOL was observed from 3months after enrollment onward and maintained throughout the 2-year observation period. A significant improvement in scores was observed for all domains of the Euro QOL 5 Dimension (EQ-5D), and the "pain", "health perception", and "posture, figure" domains of the Japanese Osteoporosis QOL Questionnaire (JOQOL). Factors identified as significantly contributing to QOL change were "fractures within the year before enrollment", "presence of spondylosis deformans", "presence of osteoarthritis", "use of activated vitamin D ", and "age" based on the JOQOL, and "presence of spondylosis deformans", "use of activated vitamin D ", and "age" based on the EQ-5D. The results suggested that the patients' perception of treatment effects, such as improvement in pain, contributes to treatment continuation. Osteoporosis patients should be informed that continuous treatment with once-weekly bisphosphonates can lead to a significant improvement in QOL regardless of concomitant locomotor diseases, to encourage them to remain on treatment. In conclusion, continuous bisphosphonate treatment improved the QOL even in patients with locomotor diseases, and the concomitant use of activated vitamin D may also facilitate further improvement in QOL.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00774-018-0914-3

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[PMID]: 29518745
[Au] Autor:Lin SY; Chen DC; Lin CL; Lee HC; Lin TC; Wang IK; Hsu CY; Kao CH
[Ad] Address:Graduate Institute of Clinical Medical Science and School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan; Division of Nephrology and Kidney Institute, China Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Risk of acute coronary syndrome in patients with cervical spondylosis.
[So] Source:Atherosclerosis;271:136-141, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1879-1484
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Cervical spondylosis (CS) is reported to be associated with increased sympathetic activity and hypertension. However, the cardiovascular (CV) outcomes of patients with CS are largely unknown. METHODS: A national insurance claims dataset of 22 million enrollees in Taiwan during 1999-2010 was used as the research database. We identified 27,948 patients with CS and age-, sex-, and comorbidity-matched controls. By using multivariate logistic regression analysis after adjustment for potential cardiovascular (CV) confounders, we calculated odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) to quantify the association between CS and acute coronary syndrome (ACS). RESULTS: A total of 744 ACS events were identified among the 27,948 patients with CS. The overall incidence of ACS was 4.27 per 1000 person-years in the CS cohort and 3.90 per 1000 person-years in the non-CS cohort, with an adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) of 1.13 (95% CI = 1.08-1.18). The aHRs of ACS were 1.08 (95% CI = 1.03-1.15) in the CS cohort without myelopathy and 1.20 (95% CI = 1.13-1.28) in the CS cohort with myelopathy, compared with the non-CS cohort. Compared with patients with CS without neurological signs, patients with CS receiving rehabilitation exhibited a 0.67 aHRs of ACS (95% CI = 0.59-0.76), whereas those with neurological signs receiving spinal decompression exhibited 0.73 aHRs of ACS (95% CI = 0.63-0.84). CONCLUSIONS: CS is associated with an increased risk of ACS. Receiving treatment for CS, either rehabilitation or spinal decompression, is associated with less risk of ACS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 3729 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29388207
[Au] Autor:Han YZ; Tian Y; Zhang H; Zhao YQ; Xu M; Guo XY
[Ad] Address:Department of Anesthesiology, Peking University Third Hospital, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Radiologic indicators for prediction of difficult laryngoscopy in patients with cervical spondylosis.
[So] Source:Acta Anaesthesiol Scand;62(4):474-482, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1399-6576
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: We identified the most useful variables for prediction of difficult laryngoscopy in patients with cervical spondylosis according to physical indicators and preoperative skeletal X-ray and soft tissue MRI measurements. We hypothesized that there was a closer association between difficult laryngoscopy and radiologic indicators. METHODS: We randomly enroled 315 patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery and analysed the radiological and physical data in predicting difficult laryngoscopy. RESULTS: We identified five variables that were most useful in predicting difficult laryngoscopy: the inter-incisor gap (P = 0.006), modified Mallampati test score (P = 0.004), distance from the highest point of the hyoid bone to the mandibular body (P < 0.001), most antero-inferior point of the upper central incisor tooth (P < 0.001), and length of the epiglottis (P = 0.002). Binary multivariate logistic regression analyses identified three factors that were independently associated with difficult laryngoscopy: the Mallampati score, distance from the hyoid bone to the mandibular body, and the anterior-inferior point of the upper central incisor tooth. The odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals were 1.547 (1.029-2.327), 1.222 (1.139-1.310), and 1.224 (1.133-1.322), respectively. The AUC for hyoid bone distance to mandibular body (0.832) was larger than that of anterior-inferior point of the upper central incisor tooth (0.802, P > 0.05) and that of modified Mallampati test (0.602, P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: Distance from the highest point of the hyoid bone to the mandibular body appears to be the most accurate indicator for difficult laryngoscopy in patients with cervical spondylosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/aas.13078

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[PMID]: 29205971
[Au] Autor:Wang LX; Zhu GL; Qi LQ; Sheng YY
[Ad] Address:Hangzhou Qiuzheng Judicial Identification, Hangzhou 311100, China.
[Ti] Title:[Analysis of the Injury-disease Relationship between Spondylolysis and Trauma in 26 Forensic Identifications].
[So] Source:Fa Yi Xue Za Zhi;32(6):434-437, 2016 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1004-5619
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To expound the injury-disease relationship between spondylolysis and trauma for the points of forensic identification. METHODS: Total 26 cases of spondylolysis were collected and the characteristics of this disease such as age, accompanied symptoms, treatment and injury manner were discussed. RESULTS: The causal relationship existed between trauma and injury consequence in 2 appraised individuals and both of them aged less than 50 years old. The injury manners of both were high-energy injury with combined injury and these 2 patients were treated by operation. CONCLUSIONS: The analysis of injury-disease relationship between spondylolysis and trauma should be paid attention in the middle-young age under 50 years old. More importantly, the injury-disease relationship should be analyzed in the patients who chose operative treatment.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Spondylolysis/pathology
Wounds and Injuries/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Forensic Pathology
Humans
Middle Aged
Spondylolysis/surgery
Wounds and Injuries/surgery
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171206
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3969/j.issn.1004-5619.2016.06.010

  5 / 3729 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29510291
[Au] Autor:Missori P; Domenicucci M; Marruzzo D
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, Neurosurgery, Policlinico Umberto I, Rome, "Sapienza" University of Rome, Italy. Electronic address: missorp@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Clinical effects of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament Removal and Wide Anterior Cervical Corpectomy for Spondylosis.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Removing the posterior longitudinal ligament in cervical corpectomy is a controversial issue: it is unclear whether the risks are counterbalanced by clinical benefits. Another unexplored topic is whether the width of the corpectomy affects outcome. METHODS: This cross-sectional retrospective study included consecutive patients that underwent cervical corpectomy for spondylosis by 6 different neurosurgeons. We compared two groups, where the posterior longitudinal ligament was either removed (N=15 patients) or preserved (N=21 patients). The posterior width of the corpectomy was assessed postoperatively with computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Clinical results were evaluated with the Visual analogue scale (VAS), Modified Japanese Orthopedic Association Scale (MJOAS), Cooper Scale (CS), and Neck Disability Index (NDI), in the long-term follow-up. RESULTS: Compared to preservation, removal of the posterior longitudinal ligament produced more favorable clinical results (but not statistically significant), based on the VAS (+41%, P=0.48), MJOAS (+26.5%, P=0.62), CS (+19%, P=0.75), and NDI (+62%, P=0.22). MRIs showed that removing the posterior longitudinal ligament produced greater evagination of the dural sac into the space left by the corpectomy. Improvements in clinical outcome were associated with greater posterior bone wall removal in the corpectomy (corpectomy width ≥15.6 mm; p<0.05), based on the VAS, NDI, and MJOAS. CONCLUSION: Removing the posterior longitudinal ligament in cervical corpectomy may produce a better outcome, particularly when associated with greater posterior bone wall removal in the corpectomy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 3729 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29500543
[Au] Autor:Park MK; Cho DC; Bang WS; Kim KT; Sung JK
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, School of Medicine, Kyungpook National University, Kyungpook National University Hospital, 130 Dongdukro, Jung-gu, Daegu, 41944, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Recurrent esophageal perforation after anterior cervical spine surgery: case report.
[So] Source:Eur Spine J;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0932
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Delayed esophageal perforation after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is an extremely rare cause of infection such as spondylodiscitis. We present a rare case in which a patient had two delayed esophageal perforations occurring 20 and 25years after ACDF. By sharing our experience of this rare case, we hope to provide new information related to delayed esophageal perforation. METHODS: We present the case of a 72-year-old patient who underwent ACDF due to cervical spondylosis 25years ago. Delayed esophageal perforation occurred 20years postoperatively and healed spontaneously with conservative treatment. RESULTS: Five years later, a second esophageal perforation occurred, which required surgical intervention and involved recurrent infection. CONCLUSIONS: We suggest that it is important to consider follow-up in patients with spontaneously healed esophageal perforations. Furthermore, any patient with symptoms subsequent to a spontaneously healed esophageal perforation, even after an interval of several years, should receive a thorough evaluation for possible recurrent esophageal perforation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00586-018-5540-1

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[PMID]: 29309982
[Au] Autor:Iida Y; Murata H; Johkura K; Higashida T; Tanaka T; Tateishi K
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Yokohama City University, Yokohama, Kanagawa, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Bow Hunter's Syndrome by Nondominant Vertebral Artery Compression: A Case Report, Literature Review, and Significance of Downbeat Nystagmus as the Diagnostic Clue.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;111:367-372, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Bow hunter's syndrome (BHS) is rare and typically induced by mechanical compression of the dominant vertebral artery (VA) during head rotation. We report a case of BHS induced by nondominant VA compression in which contralateral VA patency was preserved. Definite diagnosis of BHS is not often feasible because of transient symptoms and nonspecific clinical features, such as vertigo or dizziness, especially in nondominant VA compression. We discuss the diagnostic clues of BHS and clinical features of BHS caused by nondominant VA compression through a literature review. CASE DESCRIPTION: A 65-year-old man suffered repeated bouts of dizziness whenever his head was rotated to the left. This dizziness was consistently accompanied by downbeat nystagmus (DBN). Radiography revealed left VA compression by a lateral osteophyte at the C3-C4 level only during left head rotation. In contrast, patency of the right VA, which was almost equivalent in size to the left VA, was preserved during head rotation. The distinctive clinical finding of head rotation-induced DBN, which is usually associated with lesions involving the caudal midline cerebellum, was observed. Symptoms disappeared immediately after left VA decompression with osteophytectomy and C3-C4 fusion. CONCLUSIONS: Despite excellent flow through the contralateral VA, occlusion of the nondominant VA occasionally induces BHS. According to a review of the literature, BHS cases do not always depend on the VA on one side for blood supply. Head rotation-induced DBN can be useful for diagnosis of BHS, even in cases of nondominant VA compression.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  8 / 3729 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29293101
[Au] Autor:Lavian JD; Murray DP; Hollern DA; Bloom L; Shah NV; Gewolb D; Segreto FA; Powell S; Messina JC; Naziri Q; Yoshihara H; Paulino CB; Diebo BG
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Downstate Medical Center, State University of New York, Brooklyn, NY.
[Ti] Title:The Risks of Hepatitis C in Association With Cervical Spinal Surgery: Analysis of Radiculopathy and Myelopathy Patients.
[So] Source:Clin Spine Surg;31(2):86-92, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2380-0194
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective review. OBJECTIVE: To investigate rates of in-hospital postsurgical complications among hepatitis C-infected patients after cervical spinal surgery in comparison with uninfected patients and determine independent risk factors. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA: Studying hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a possible risk factor for cervical spine postoperative complications is prudent, given the high prevalence of cervical spondylosis and HCV in older patients. Spine literature is limited with respect to the impact of chronic HCV upon complications after surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Patients who underwent cervical spine surgery for cervical radiculopathy (CR) or cervical myelopathy (CM) from 2005 to 2013 were retrospectively reviewed using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. Patients were divided into CR and CM groups, with comparative subgroup analysis of HCV and no-HCV patients. Univariate analysis compared demographics and complications. Binary logistic stepwise regression modeling identified any independent outcome predictors (covariates: age, sex, Deyo score, and surgical approach). RESULTS: In total, 227,310 patients (HCV: n=2542; no-HCV: n=224,764) were included. From 2005 to 2013, HCV infection prevalence among all cervical spinal fusion cases increased from 0.8% to 1.2%. HCV patients were more likely to be African American or Hispanic and have Medicare and/or Medicaid (all P<0.001). Overall complication rates among HCV patients with CR or CM increased, specifically related to device (CR: 3.1% vs. 1.9%; CM: 2.9% vs. 1.3%), hematoma/seroma (CR: 1.1% vs. 0.4%; CM: 1.8% vs. 0.8%), and sepsis (CR: 0.4% vs. 0.1%; CM: 1.1% vs. 0.5%) (all P≤0.001). Among CR and CM patients, HCV significantly predicted increased complication rates [odds ratio (OR): 1.268; OR: 1.194], hospital stay (OR: 1.738; OR: 1.861), and hospital charges (OR: 1.516; OR: 1.732; all P≤0.044). CONCLUSIONS: HCV patients undergoing cervical spinal surgery were found to have increased risks of postoperative complications and increased risk associated with surgical approach. These findings should augment preoperative risk stratification and counseling for HCV patients and their spine surgeons. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/BSD.0000000000000606

  9 / 3729 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29303467
[Au] Autor:Coric D; Guyer RD; Nunley PD; Musante D; Carmody C; Gordon C; Lauryssen C; Boltes MO; Ohnmeiss DD
[Ad] Address:Carolina Neurosurgery and Spine Associates, Charlotte.
[Ti] Title:Prospective, randomized multicenter study of cervical arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: 5-year results with a metal-on-metal artificial disc.
[So] Source:J Neurosurg Spine;28(3):252-261, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1547-5646
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE Seven cervical total disc replacement (TDR) devices have received FDA approval since 2006. These devices represent a heterogeneous assortment of implants made from various biomaterials with different biomechanical properties. The majority of these devices are composed of metallic endplates with a polymer core. In this prospective, randomized multicenter study, the authors evaluate the safety and efficacy of a metal-on-metal (MoM) TDR (Kineflex|C) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in the treatment of single-level spondylosis with radiculopathy through a long-term (5-year) follow-up. METHODS An FDA-regulated investigational device exemption (IDE) pivotal trial was conducted at 21 centers across the United States. Standard validated outcome measures including the Neck Disability Index (NDI) and visual analog scale (VAS) for assessing pain were used. Patients were randomized to undergo TDR using the Kineflex|C cervical artificial disc or anterior cervical fusion using structural allograft and an anterior plate. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and at 6 weeks and 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, 48, and 60 months after surgery. Serum ion analysis was performed on a subset of patients randomized to receive the MoM TDR. RESULTS A total of 269 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to undergo either TDR (136 patients) or ACDF (133 patients). There were no significant differences between the TDR and ACDF groups in terms of operative time, blood loss, or length of hospital stay. In both groups, the mean NDI scores improved significantly by 6 weeks after surgery and remained significantly improved throughout the 60-month follow-up (both p < 0.01). Similarly, VAS pain scores improved significantly by 6 weeks and remained significantly improved through the 60-month follow-up (both p < 0.01). There were no significant changes in outcomes between the 24- and 60-month follow-ups in either group. Range of motion in the TDR group decreased at 3 months but was significantly greater than the preoperative mean value at the 12- and 24-month follow-ups and remained significantly improved through the 60-month period. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups in terms of reoperation/revision surgery or device-/surgery-related adverse events. The serum ion analysis revealed cobalt and chromium levels significantly lower than the levels that merit monitoring. CONCLUSIONS Cervical TDR with an MoM device is safe and efficacious at the 5-year follow-up. These results from a prospective randomized study support that Kineflex|C TDR as a viable alternative to ACDF in appropriately selected patients with cervical radiculopathy. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00374413 (clinicaltrials.gov).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.3171/2017.5.SPINE16824

  10 / 3729 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29482826
[Au] Autor:Monie AP; Price RI; Lind CRP; Singer KP
[Ad] Address:The Centre for Musculoskeletal Studies, School of Surgery, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia. Electronic address: aubrey.monie@research.uwa.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Change in Low Back Movement Patterns After Neurosurgical Intervention for Lumbar Spondylosis.
[So] Source:J Manipulative Physiol Ther;41(2):111-122, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1532-6586
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The purpose of this study was to assess the use of computer-aided combined movement examination (CME) to measure change in low back movement after neurosurgical intervention for lumbar spondylosis and to use a CME normal reference range (NRR) to compare and contrast movement patterns identified from lumbar disk disease, disk protrusion, and nerve root compression cases. METHODS: A test-retest, cohort observational study was conducted. Computer-aided CME was used to record lumbar range of motion in 18 patients, along with pain, stiffness, disability, and health self-report questionnaires. A minimal clinically important difference of 30% was used to interpret meaningful change in self-reports. z Scores were used to compare CME. Post hoc observation included subgrouping cases into 3 discrete pathologic conditions-disk disease, disk protrusion, and nerve root compression-to report intergroup differences in CME. RESULTS: Self-report data indicated that 11, 7, and 10 patients improved by ≥30% in pain, stiffness, and function, respectively. Three patients experienced clinically significant improvement in health survey. A CME pattern reduced in all directions suggested disk disease. Unilaterally restricted movement in side-flexed or extended directions suggested posterolateral disk protrusion with or without ipsilateral nerve root compression. Bilateral restrictions in extension suggested posterior disk protrusion with or without nerve root compression. In 11 of the 18 cases, CME converged toward the NRR after surgery. CONCLUSION: We described the use of CME to identify atypical lumbar movement relative to an NRR. Data from this short-term postoperative study provide preliminary evidence for CME movement patterns suggestive of disk disease, disk protrusion, and nerve root compression.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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