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[PMID]: 29432912
[Au] Autor:Abuelizz HA; El-Dib RA; Marzouk M; Al-Salahi R
[Ad] Address:Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry, College of Pharmacy, King Saud University, P.O. Box 2457, Riyadh 11451, Saudi Arabia.
[Ti] Title:In vitro evaluation of new 2-phenoxy-benzo[g][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]quinazoline derivatives as antimicrobial agents.
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;117:60-67, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Previously, seventeen 2-phenoxy-benzo[g][1,2,4]triazolo[1,5-a]quinazoline derivatives were prepared and characterized by physicochemical and spectral means. This study was conducted to evaluate their activities in vitro against five Gram-negative and five Gram-positive of clinically pathogenic bacterial strains and ten fungal strains. The antimicrobial activity was assessed, and the minimum inhibitory concentration values of the tested compounds were determined in µg ml , using the diffusion agar technique. The bacterial strains used were Escherichia coli (ATCC 25922), Proteus mirabilis (ATCC 7002), Klebsiella oxytoca (ATCC 700324), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (ATCC 10145), Enterobacter cloacae (ATCC 13047D-5), Bacillus subtilis (NRRL B-543), Enterococcus faecalis (RCMB 0100154-2), Staphylococcus aureus (ATCC 29213), Staphylococcus epidermidis (ATCC 12228), and Streptococcus pyogenes (RCMB 0100174-2). Aspergillus fumigatus (RCMB 02568), Syncephalastrum racemosum (IMI 21178), Geotricum candidum (IMI 329542), Candida albicans (ATCC 10231), Aspergillus niger (IMI 130783), Cryptococcus neoformans (NRRL Y-1518), Candida tropicalis (RCMB 05239), Penicillium expansum (IMI 146655), Microsporum canis (RCMB 0834), and Trichophyton mentagrophytes (RCMB 0925) were used as the fungal strains. Ampicillin and gentamicin were used as reference antibacterial drugs and amphotericin B was used as the reference antifungal drug. The antimicrobial studies revealed that the tested compounds 6-8, 11, 12, and 14-16 showed the highest activities against the bacterial and fungal strains. The current study showed that some benzo[g]traizoloquinazolines displayed remarkable antimicrobial activity and could be used as template for further design of potent antimicrobial agent.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29427709
[Au] Autor:Saravanan M; Arokiyaraj S; Lakshmi T; Pugazhendhi A
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, College of Health Sciences, Mekelle University, Ethiopia.
[Ti] Title:Synthesis of silver nanoparticles from Phenerochaete chrysosporium (MTCC-787) and their antibacterial activity against human pathogenic bacteria.
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;117:68-72, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present study elucidates an eco-friendly method for synthesizing silver nanoparticles using Phenerochaete chrysosporium (MTCC-787), its bactericidal and cytotoxic effect were studied. The formation of nanoparticles was evidenced by color change and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Atomic Force Microscope and Transmission electron microscope, showed spherical and oval shapes particles in the sizes ranging between 34 and 90 nm. The biosynthesised silver nanoparticles showed significant antibacterial activity against Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis at a high dose. Further, the nanoparticles observed to be non-toxic at 12.5 µg/ml towards fibroblast cells.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 12426 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29399876
[Au] Autor:Martínez-García S; Rodríguez-Martínez S; Cancino-Diaz ME; Cancino-Diaz JC
[Ad] Address:Departamento de Microbiología, Escuela Nacional de Ciencias Biológicas, Instituto Politécnico Nacional, Ciudad de México, Mexico.
[Ti] Title:Extracellular proteases of Staphylococcus epidermidis: roles as virulence factors and their participation in biofilm.
[So] Source:APMIS;126(3):177-185, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1600-0463
[Cp] Country of publication:Denmark
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Staphylococci produce a large number of extracellular proteases, some of which are considered as potential virulence factors. Staphylococcus epidermidis is a causative agent of nosocomial infections in medical devices by the formation of biofilms. It has been proposed that proteases contribute to the different stages of biofilm formation. S. epidermidis secretes a small number of extracellular proteases, such as serine protease Esp, cysteine protease EcpA, and metalloprotease SepA that have a relatively low substrate specificity. Recent findings indicate a significant contribution of extracellular proteases in biofilm formation through the proteolytic inactivation of adhesion molecules. The objective of this work is to provide an overview of the current knowledge of S. epidermidis' extracellular proteases during pathogenicity, especially in the different stages of biofilm formation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bacterial Proteins/metabolism
Biofilms/growth & development
Cysteine Proteases/metabolism
Metalloendopeptidases/metabolism
Serine Proteases/metabolism
Staphylococcus epidermidis/enzymology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cell Adhesion Molecules/metabolism
Cross Infection/microbiology
Cross Infection/pathology
Humans
Staphylococcal Infections/microbiology
Staphylococcal Infections/pathology
Staphylococcus epidermidis/metabolism
Staphylococcus epidermidis/pathogenicity
Virulence Factors/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Bacterial Proteins); 0 (Cell Adhesion Molecules); 0 (Virulence Factors); EC 3.4.- (Cysteine Proteases); EC 3.4.- (Serine Proteases); EC 3.4.24.- (Metalloendopeptidases); EC 3.4.24.- (SepA protein, Staphylococcus epidermidis)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180206
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/apm.12805

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Corrente, José Eduardo
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[PMID]: 29521121
[Au] Autor:Pinheiro L; Mello PL; Abraão LM; Corrente JE; Lourdes Rs Cunha M
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology & Immunology, Institute of Biosciences of Botucatu, Universidade Estadual Paulista - UNESP, Botucatu 18618-970, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of reference values for phenotypic tests to detect oxacillin resistance in coagulase-negative staphylococci.
[So] Source:Future Microbiol;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1746-0921
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To evaluate the adequacy of the disc-diffusion test and E-test compared with detection of mecA for coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from blood cultures, nasal swabs and wounds. RESULTS: Agreement between all techniques was observed in 65.7% of cases. The greatest discrepancy between mecA/susceptible E-test was observed for non-epidermidis species. A resistance breakpoint ≤19 mm using the oxacillin disc was found to best classify all coagulase-negative staphylococci isolates; Staphylococcus epidermidis, ≤19 mm (oxacillin) and ≤27 mm (cefoxitin); Staphylococcus haemolyticus and Staphylococcus capitis, ≤21 mm (oxacillin) and ≤18 mm (cefoxitin); Staphylococcus warneri, MICs ≥0.75 mg/l. CONCLUSION: Although no longer recommended by the Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute, we observed some cases in which only the oxacillin disc-diffusion test detected resistance. The discrepancy between phenotypic tests and mecA is probably due to heterogeneity and borderline resistance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.2217/fmb-2017-0221

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[PMID]: 29516509
[Au] Autor:Kou Y; Halpenny M; Elmoazzen H; Ramirez-Arcos S
[Ad] Address:Canadian Blood Services Centre for Innovation, Product and Process Development, Ottawa, Ontario.
[Ti] Title:Development of a proof of principle for universal neutralization of antibiotics in cord blood by-products used for sterility testing.
[So] Source:Transfusion;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Bacterial contamination of cord blood (CB) represents a safety risk for transplantation patients. CB sterility testing at Canadian Blood Services' Cord Blood Bank is performed using a 1:1 mix of CB-derived plasma and red blood cells (RBCs). Culture bottles of an automated culture system, which lack antimicrobial neutralization properties, are used for bacterial screening of CB. This process is unsuitable for CB-containing antibiotics, potentially resulting in false-negative results. This study was aimed at developing a protocol for antibiotic neutralization in CB used for sterility testing. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Phase 1: four neutralizers-penicillinase, ion exchange resins L and A, lecithin + Tween80, and activated charcoal (AC)-were individually tested to neutralize penicillin or gentamicin in cultures of Staphylococcus epidermidis or Klebsiella pneumoniae, respectively, adjusted to 100 colony forming units/mL, in Müller-Hinton broth (MHB). Phase 2: combinations of penicillinase plus resin L or penicillinase plus AC were assayed for the simultaneous neutralization of both antibiotics in MHB. Phase 3: penicillinase plus resin L was used to neutralize both antibiotics in CB sterility testing samples (plasma + RBCs). RESULTS: Phase 1: penicillin was neutralized by penicillinase and resin A, while gentamicin was neutralized by resin L and AC. Phase 2: the antibiotics were simultaneously neutralized by the two neutralizer combinations tested. Phase 3: neutralization of both antibiotics in CB was achieved with penicillinase and resin L. CONCLUSION: A protocol for antibiotic neutralization in CB sterility testing samples has been successfully developed at Canadian Blood Services' Cord Blood bank. This in-house assay applies to any culture-based CB bacterial screening method.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/trf.14567

  6 / 12426 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29514423
[Au] Autor:Steinka I; Kukulowicz A
[Ad] Address:Department of Commodity Science and Quality Management, Gdynia Maritime University, Poland.
[Ti] Title:Identification and study of the behavior of S. aureus and S. epidermidis in fresh and frozen strawberries.
[So] Source:Acta Sci Pol Technol Aliment;17(1):27-35, 2018 Jan-Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1898-9594
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which is resistant to many antibiotics, creates a serious problem for human health if present in food. This study aimed to assess the quality of commercially-available fresh and frozen strawberries and to compare the behavior of staphylococci in these fruits as affected by the temperature of freezing. METHODS: The research material included different species of fresh strawberries and strawberries frozen with the fluidization method to –40°C and packaged in an industrial environment. These were checked for the presence of Staphylococcus aureus resistant to methicillin (MRSA). The strawberries were purchased at food markets in the Tricity and were divided into two groups (A and B). Group A was analyzed without washing, group B was washed in sterile, distilled water for 15 minutes. The strawberries were placed in sterile PE/PA bags. Then 1 mL of Staphylococcus aureus Rosenbach ATCC 25923 and Staphylococcus epi- dermidis ATCC 12228 of known inoculum were added to each bag (except the control samples). The samples were mixed thoroughly and then hermetically sealed. The samples were then frozen and stored in the freezer at a temperature of –18 ±2°C for 2 months. In the material being tested Staphylococcus aureus was cultured in selective Baird-Parker RPF Agar. Incubation was carried out at a temperature of 37°C for 48 hours in sterile conditions. After 48 hours of incubation, characteristic colonies were transferred onto the reaction field of the PROLEXTM STAPH XTRA LATEX KIT. RESULTS: The results obtained show that 1/3 of the samples of commercial strawberries analyzed were colo- nized by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The process of fruit washing was observed to reduce the number of samples containing MRSA from 11.7 to 8.3%. There was no significant difference in the size of the S. aureus ATCC 25923 population after freezing the strawberries at –18°C, depending on the particular washing process for these fruits. The analysis of strawberries frozen with the fluidization method at –40°C showed a minimum contamination degree with S. aureus after the period of storage. CONCLUSIONS: Studies have shown that MRSA are present in 15.4% of strawberries obtained from the field. Storing strawberries frozen at –18ºC causes a reduction in the number of S. aureus by 0.16 log10CFU/g  and S. epidermidis by 0.47 log10CFU/g when they were subjected to rinsing after harvesting. Effective inhibition of MRSA in strawberries is obtained when fluidization technology is applied at –40ºC.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.17306/J.AFS.0535

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[PMID]: 29442030
[Au] Autor:Resende AFC; Pereira AF; Moreira TP; Patrício PSO; Fialho SL; Cunha GMF; Silva-Cunha A; Magalhães JT; Silva GR
[Ti] Title:PLGA Implants containing vancomycin and dexamethasone: development, characterization and bactericidal effects.
[So] Source:Pharmazie;71(8):439-446, 2016 08 01.
[Is] ISSN:0031-7144
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Post-operative endophthalmitis is an infection and an inflammation of the eye following a surgical procedure. Its treatment is based on drug injections into the eye. However, this treatment can lead to ocular complications. Intraocular implants could substitute the conventional therapy. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) implants comprising on vancomycin and dexamethasone were evaluated as drug delivery system to treat endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Implants were characterized by drug content uniformity, Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR), Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Wide Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and in vitro drug release. The bactericidal effect of vancomycin, eluted from the implants, was demonstrated against Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The drugs were uniformly distributed in the polymer. The analytical techniques revealed the chemical integrity of the drugs incorporated into the polymer and the modification of dexamethasone semi-crystalline nature. Drugs were controlled released from implants; and the eluted vancomycin showed bactericidal effects. In conclusion, PLGA implants containing vancomycin and dexamethasone may represent a therapeutic alternative to treat post-operative endophthalmitis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/administration & dosage
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/administration & dosage
Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use
Bacteria/drug effects
Dexamethasone/administration & dosage
Dexamethasone/therapeutic use
Drug Carriers
Lactic Acid
Polyglycolic Acid
Surgical Wound Infection/prevention & control
Vancomycin/administration & dosage
Vancomycin/therapeutic use
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/pharmacology
Drug Implants
Drug Liberation
Endophthalmitis/microbiology
Endophthalmitis/prevention & control
Humans
Microbial Sensitivity Tests
Ophthalmologic Surgical Procedures
Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects
Staphylococcus epidermidis/drug effects
Vancomycin/pharmacology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents); 0 (Drug Carriers); 0 (Drug Implants); 0 (polylactic acid-polyglycolic acid copolymer); 26009-03-0 (Polyglycolic Acid); 33X04XA5AT (Lactic Acid); 6Q205EH1VU (Vancomycin); 7S5I7G3JQL (Dexamethasone)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180215
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1691/ph.2016.6009

  8 / 12426 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29438544
[Au] Autor:Weßels C; Strommenger B; Klare I; Bender J; Messler S; Mattner F; Krakau M; Werner G; Layer F
[Ad] Address:Institute of Hospital Hygiene, City of Cologne Hospitals, Cologne, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Emergence and control of linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis in an ICU of a German hospital.
[So] Source:J Antimicrob Chemother;, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2091
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objectives: To investigate an outbreak of linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (LRSE) in an interdisciplinary ICU, linezolid consumption and infection control measures taken. Methods: Routine surveillance of nosocomial infections revealed colonization and infection with LRSE affecting 14 patients during a 15 month period. LRSE isolates were analysed with respect to their clonal relatedness, antimicrobial susceptibility, the presence of cfr and/or mutations in the 23S rRNA, rplC, rplD and rplV genes. cfr plasmids were characterized by Illumina sequencing. Medical records were reviewed and antibiotic consumption was determined. Results: Molecular typing identified the presence of three different LRSE clusters: PFGE type I/ST168 (n = 5), PFGE type II/ST5 (n = 10) and PFGE type III/ST2 (n = 1). Ten strains harboured the cfr gene; we also detected mutations in the respective ribosomal protein genes. WGS revealed an almost identical 39 kb cfr plasmid obtained from strains of different genetic background (ST2, ST5, ST168) that shows high similarity to the recently published LRSE plasmid p12-02300. Due to an increase in the number of patients treated for infections with MRSA, a significant increase in linezolid usage was noted from January to July 2014 (from 5.55 to 20.41 DDDs/100 patient-days). Conclusions: Here, we report the molecular epidemiology of LRSE in an ICU. Our results suggest the selection of resistant mutants under linezolid treatment as well as the spread of cfr-carrying plasmids. The reduction of linezolid usage and the strengthening of contact precautions proved to be effective infection control measures.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jac/dky010

  9 / 12426 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29360979
[Au] Autor:Layer F; Vourli S; Karavasilis V; Strommenger B; Dafopoulou K; Tsakris A; Werner G; Pournaras S
[Ad] Address:Robert Koch Institute, Department of Infectious Diseases, National Centre for Staphylococci and Enterococci, Wernigerode, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Dissemination of linezolid-dependent, linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis clinical isolates belonging to CC5 in German hospitals.
[So] Source:J Antimicrob Chemother;, 2018 Jan 19.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2091
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objectives: Linezolid-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (LRSE) and linezolid-dependent ST22 strains have been shown to predominate in tertiary care facilities all over Greece. We report herein the dissemination of ST22 but also ST2, ST5 and ST168 linezolid-dependent LRSE clones in four unrelated German hospitals. Methods: Fourteen LRSE clinical isolates recovered during 2012-14 from five distantly located German hospitals were tested by for MIC determination broth microdilution and Etest, PCR/sequencing for cfr and for mutations in 23S rRNA, rplC, rplD and rplV genes, MLST, PFGE and growth curves without and with linezolid at 16 and 32 mg/L. Results: Most (11, 78.6%) isolates had linezolid MICs >256 mg/L. Five isolates carried the cfr gene. Eight isolates belonged to ST22, two isolates each to ST168 and ST2 and one isolate each to ST5 and ST23. Ten isolates [seven belonging to ST22 and one to each of ST2, ST5 and ST168; all these STs belong to clonal complex (CC) 5] exhibited linezolid-dependent growth, growing significantly faster in linezolid-containing broth. Four isolates were non-dependent (one belonging to each of ST22, ST2, ST23 and ST168). Four isolates came from three different hospitals, whereas four and six isolates were recovered during outbreaks of LRSE in two distinct hospitals. Conclusions: The multi-clonal dissemination of CC5 linezolid-dependent LRSE throughout German hospitals along with the clonal expansion of ST22 linezolid-dependent LRSE in Greek hospitals is of particular concern. It is plausible that this characteristic is inherent and provides a selective advantage to CC5 LRSE under linezolid pressure, contributing to their dissemination throughout hospitals in these countries.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jac/dkx524

  10 / 12426 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29510283
[Au] Autor:Chen YC; Zhang L; Li EN; Ding LX; Zhang GA; Hou Y; Yuan W
[Ad] Address:Department of Spine Surgery, Beijing Shijitan Hospital, Capital Medical University, Beijing, 100038, China. Electronic address: yingchun.chen.bj@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:One or two drains for the treatment of surgical site infections after lumbar spine surgery.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The optimal drainage after debridement for treating postoperative SSI is still controversial. We comprehensively compared single-tube drainage method with double-tube drainage method. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed 1125 patients with lumbar degenerative disease who received lumbar surgery. Among them, 26 patients were diagnosed as postoperative SSI and divided into two groups, including single-tube drainage group (1 drain) and double-tube drainage group (2 drains). RESULTS: A total of 26 adult patients (17 women and 9 men) were identified as postoperative SSI following lumbar surgery (26/1125=2.3%) and treated with debridement. There were no significant differences in the patients' age, gender, BMI, the mean number of pedicle screws, mean operation time, amount of bleeding and drainage between two groups. There were no significant differences between two groups in the applications of antibiotics (P > 0.05). Bacterial cultures were routinely performed in all 26 cases of SSI and 80.7% (21/26) patients had a positive culture. Among them, Staphylococcus species, including predominantly S. aureus and S. epidermidis, was the most common pathogen, followed by MRSA, E.coli, Acinetobacter, K. pneumonia and E. faecalis. Moreover, there were no significant differences in the drainage efficiency between 1 drain group and 2 drains group (P>0.05). CONCLUSIONS: There were no significant differences between 1 drain group and 2 drains group in surgery/patient-related risk factors, pathogenic bacteria/antibiotic therapy, results of laboratory tests, even the drainage efficiency and time. However, patients in 1 drain group exhibited better clinical outcome and shorter hospital stay.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher


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