Database : MEDLINE
Search on : stomach [Words]
References found : 209873 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 20988 go to page                         

  1 / 209873 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524856
[Au] Autor:Kawaida H; Kimura A; Watanabe M; Akaike H; Hosomura N; Kawaguchi Y; Amemiya H; Sudo M; Kono H; Matsuda M; Fujii H; Ichikawa D; Fukasawa M; Takahashi E; Sano K; Inoue T
[Ad] Address:First Department of Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, University of Yamanashi, Japan. Electronic address: kawaidah@yamanashi.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Successful laparoscopic partial gastrectomy and spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy for gastric duplication cyst connecting with the pancreatic tail.
[So] Source:Int J Surg Case Rep;44:176-180, 2018 Feb 24.
[Is] ISSN:2210-2612
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Gastrointestinal duplication cyst is a congenital rare disease that may occur in any region from mouth to anus. Among them, gastric duplication cysts are very rare. CASE REPORT: Here we report A 23-year-old Japanese man who visited our hospital to evaluate an abdominal tumor. Abdominal computed tomography showed a well-circumscribed homogenous low-density mass measuring 6.2 × 6.0 cm between the pancreatic tail and the upper posterior wall on the gastric greater curvature, and the mass seemed to originate from the pancreatic tail. We found intraoperatively that the mass adhered to the stomach and pancreatic tail strongly, so we performed laparoscopic partial gastrectomy and spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy. Pathological findings showed that the lining epithelium of the cystic mass consisted of the gastric foveolar epithelium with fundic glands. Furthermore, the pancreatic tissue of the pancreatic tail and the muscular layer of the cystic mass were intermingled. DISCUSSION: GDCs are usually diagnosed at a younger age and in adults, they are very rare. Therefore, surgical resection is considered to be the best treatment due to the difficulty of diagnosis, and also that it mimics a pancreatic cystic tumor, and malignant transformation. Complete resection of the cyst is the ideal technique and laparoscopic surgery should be selected whenever possible. CONCLUSION: We experienced a case of GDC continuous to both stomach and pancreatic tail. Laparoscopic surgery is safety and useful even if GDC is continuous with both the stomach and the pancreas.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 209873 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29524846
[Au] Autor:Hubig M; Muggenthaler H; Schenkl S; Mall G
[Ad] Address:Institute of Forensic Medicine, Jena University Hospital - Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany. Electronic address: michael.hubig@med.uni-jena.de.
[Ti] Title:Improving stomach content based death time determination by maximum probability estimation.
[So] Source:Forensic Sci Int;285:135-146, 2018 Feb 12.
[Is] ISSN:1872-6283
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Stomach content based death time estimation (SCE), is a well-known technique in forensic sciences. Among more qualitatively oriented approaches the content percentage based method SCE by Tröger, Baur and Spann yields quantitative results and gives stochastic error measures for its outputs. This is possible since the methods estimator, which we call transformed expectation estimator (TEE) as well as the probability distribution of the time between last meal and death are determined numerically, though in SCE the estimator and confidence intervals are presented graphically only. Our articles outcomes are.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  3 / 209873 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29510660
[Au] Autor:Lie KK; Tørresen OK; Solbakken MH; Rønnestad I; Tooming-Klunderud A; Nederbragt AJ; Jentoft S; Sæle Ø
[Ad] Address:Institute of Marine Research, P.O. Box. 1870, Nordnes, 5817, Bergen, NO, Norway. KaiKristoffer.Lie@hi.no.
[Ti] Title:Loss of stomach, loss of appetite? Sequencing of the ballan wrasse (Labrus bergylta) genome and intestinal transcriptomic profiling illuminate the evolution of loss of stomach function in fish.
[So] Source:BMC Genomics;19(1):186, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2164
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The ballan wrasse (Labrus bergylta) belongs to a large teleost family containing more than 600 species showing several unique evolutionary traits such as lack of stomach and hermaphroditism. Agastric fish are found throughout the teleost phylogeny, in quite diverse and unrelated lineages, indicating stomach loss has occurred independently multiple times in the course of evolution. By assembling the ballan wrasse genome and transcriptome we aimed to determine the genetic basis for its digestive system function and appetite regulation. Among other, this knowledge will aid the formulation of aquaculture diets that meet the nutritional needs of agastric species. RESULTS: Long and short read sequencing technologies were combined to generate a ballan wrasse genome of 805 Mbp. Analysis of the genome and transcriptome assemblies confirmed the absence of genes that code for proteins involved in gastric function. The gene coding for the appetite stimulating protein ghrelin was also absent in wrasse. Gene synteny mapping identified several appetite-controlling genes and their paralogs previously undescribed in fish. Transcriptome profiling along the length of the intestine found a declining expression gradient from the anterior to the posterior, and a distinct expression profile in the hind gut. CONCLUSIONS: We showed gene loss has occurred for all known genes related to stomach function in the ballan wrasse, while the remaining functions of the digestive tract appear intact. The results also show appetite control in ballan wrasse has undergone substantial changes. The loss of ghrelin suggests that other genes, such as motilin, may play a ghrelin like role. The wrasse genome offers novel insight in to the evolutionary traits of this large family. As the stomach plays a major role in protein digestion, the lack of genes related to stomach digestion in wrasse suggests it requires formulated diets with higher levels of readily digestible protein than those for gastric species.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12864-018-4570-8

  4 / 209873 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29477742
[Au] Autor:Kobayashi-Sakamoto M; Tamai R; Isogai E; Kiyoura Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Oral Medical Science, Ohu University School of Dentistry, Koriyama, Fukushima, Japan. Electronic address: m-kobayashi@den.ohu-u.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Gastrointestinal colonisation and systemic spread of Candida albicans in mice treated with antibiotics and prednisolone.
[So] Source:Microb Pathog;117:191-199, 2018 Feb 22.
[Is] ISSN:1096-1208
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Normally, Candida albicans is a commensal microbe that resides in the human oral cavity, gut and vagina. However, the fungus can cause mucosal and systemic infections in immunocompromised individuals. The mechanism by which local mucosal infections progress to systemic candidiasis is poorly understood. Here, a murine model of gastrointestinal (GI) candidiasis was developed by inoculation of the oral cavity, followed by treatment with tetracycline (TC) and prednisolone (PSL). Temporal progression from a local infection of the oral cavity to a systemic infection was then monitored. Histological analysis of tissues from mice treated with both TC and PSL revealed massive infiltration of the tongue and stomach by hyphae. PSL increased the fungal burden in the tongue, stomach and small intestine, and facilitated dissemination to the spleen, kidney and liver within 3 days post-infection. Treatment with both TC and PSL supressed interferon (IFN)-γ and interleukin (IL)-17 (cytokines that play key roles in host defence against fungal infection) levels in the tongue, which were induced by C. albicans infection. In addition, the mucosal layer of the small intestine of mice treated with both TC and PSL was almost destroyed by the fungal infection; this may be a critical event that allows passage of the fungus across the mucosa and into the systemic circulation. Thus, this mouse model is useful for studying mechanisms underlying progression of C. albicans from a local infection of the oral cavity to a systemic infection in immunocompromised individuals.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 209873 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29467218
[Au] Autor:Willet SG; Lewis MA; Miao ZF; Liu D; Radyk MD; Cunningham RL; Burclaff J; Sibbel G; Lo HG; Blanc V; Davidson NO; Wang ZN; Mills JC
[Ad] Address:Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Internal Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
[Ti] Title:Regenerative proliferation of differentiated cells by mTORC1-dependent paligenosis.
[So] Source:EMBO J;, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2075
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In 1900, Adami speculated that a sequence of context-independent energetic and structural changes governed the reversion of differentiated cells to a proliferative, regenerative state. Accordingly, we show here that differentiated cells in diverse organs become proliferative via a shared program. Metaplasia-inducing injury caused both gastric chief and pancreatic acinar cells to decrease mTORC1 activity and massively upregulate lysosomes/autophagosomes; then increase damage associated metaplastic genes such as ; and finally reactivate mTORC1 and re-enter the cell cycle. Blocking mTORC1 permitted autophagy and metaplastic gene induction but blocked cell cycle re-entry at S-phase. In kidney and liver regeneration and in human gastric metaplasia, mTORC1 also correlated with proliferation. In lysosome-defective mice, both metaplasia-associated gene expression changes and mTORC1-mediated proliferation were deficient in pancreas and stomach. Our findings indicate differentiated cells become proliferative using a sequential program with intervening checkpoints: (i) differentiated cell structure degradation; (ii) metaplasia- or progenitor-associated gene induction; (iii) cell cycle re-entry. We propose this program, which we term "paligenosis", is a fundamental process, like apoptosis, available to differentiated cells to fuel regeneration following injury.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 209873 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29353017
[Au] Autor:Naeem M; Oshi MA; Kim J; Lee J; Cao J; Nurhasni H; Im E; Jung Y; Yoo JW
[Ad] Address:College of Pharmacy, Pusan National University, Busan, South Korea.
[Ti] Title:pH-triggered surface charge-reversal nanoparticles alleviate experimental murine colitis via selective accumulation in inflamed colon regions.
[So] Source:Nanomedicine;14(3):823-834, 2018 Jan 17.
[Is] ISSN:1549-9642
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In this study, we developed pH-triggered surface charge-reversal lipid nanoparticles (LNPs), loaded with budesonide, which could precisely deliver the drug to inflamed colon segments for the treatment of ulcerative colitis. Polyethyleneimine (PEI) was used to render LNPs cationic (PEI-LNPs), and Eudragit® S100 (ES) was coated on PEI-LNPs to obtain pH-triggered charge-reversal LNPs (ES-PEI-LNPs). ES coating avoided a burst drug release under acidic conditions mimicking the stomach and early small intestine environments and showed a sustained release in the colon. The surface charge of ES-PEI-LNPs switched from negative to positive under colonic conditions owing to pH-triggered removal of the ES coating. Bioimaging of the mouse gastrointestinal tract and confocal analysis of colon tissues revealed that ES-PEI-LNPs selectively accumulated in an inflamed colon. Furthermore, ES-PEI-LNPs mitigated experimental colitis in mice. These results suggest that the pH-triggered charge-reversal LNPs could be a promising drug carrier for ulcerative colitis therapy and other colon-targeted treatments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 209873 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29340680
[Au] Autor:Jakobsen GS; Småstuen MC; Sandbu R; Nordstrand N; Hofsø D; Lindberg M; Hertel JK; Hjelmesæth J
[Ad] Address:Morbid Obesity Centre, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Tønsberg, Norway.
[Ti] Title:Association of Bariatric Surgery vs Medical Obesity Treatment With Long-term Medical Complications and Obesity-Related Comorbidities.
[So] Source:JAMA;319(3):291-301, 2018 01 16.
[Is] ISSN:1538-3598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: The association of bariatric surgery and specialized medical obesity treatment with beneficial and detrimental outcomes remains uncertain. Objective: To compare changes in obesity-related comorbidities in patients with severe obesity (body mass index ≥40 or ≥35 and at least 1 comorbidity) undergoing bariatric surgery or specialized medical treatment. Design, Setting, and Participants: Cohort study with baseline data of exposures from November 2005 through July 2010 and follow-up data from 2006 until death or through December 2015 at a tertiary care outpatient center, Vestfold Hospital Trust, Norway. Consecutive treatment-seeking adult patients (n = 2109) with severe obesity assessed (221 patients excluded and 1888 patients included). Exposures: Bariatric surgery (n = 932, 92% gastric bypass) or specialized medical treatment (n = 956) including individual or group-based lifestyle intervention programs. Main Outcomes and Measures: Primary outcomes included remission and new onset of hypertension based on drugs dispensed according to the Norwegian Prescription Database. Prespecified secondary outcomes included changes in comorbidities. Adverse events included complications retrieved from the Norwegian Patient Registry and a local laboratory database. Results: Among 1888 patients included in the study, the mean (SD) age was 43.5 (12.3) years (1249 women [66%]; mean [SD] baseline BMI, 44.2 [6.1]; 100% completed follow-up at a median of 6.5 years [range, 0.2-10.1]). Surgically treated patients had a greater likelihood of remission and lesser likelihood for new onset of hypertension (remission: absolute risk [AR], 31.9% vs 12.4%); risk difference [RD], 19.5% [95% CI, 15.8%-23.2%], relative risk [RR], 2.1 [95% CI, 2.0-2.2]; new onset: AR, 3.5% vs 12.2%, RD, 8.7% [95% CI, 6.7%-10.7%], RR, 0.4 [95% CI, 0.3-0.5]; greater likelihood of diabetes remission: AR, 57.5% vs 14.8%; RD, 42.7% [95% CI, 35.8%-49.7%], RR, 3.9 [95% CI, 2.8-5.4]; greater risk of new-onset depression: AR, 8.9% vs 6.5%; RD, 2.4% [95% CI, 1.3%-3.5%], RR, 1.5 [95% CI, 1.4-1.7]; and treatment with opioids: AR, 19.4% vs 15.8%, RD, 3.6% [95% CI, 2.3%-4.9%], RR, 1.3 [95% CI, 1.2-1.4]). Surgical patients had a greater risk for undergoing at least 1 additional gastrointestinal surgical procedure (AR, 31.3% vs 15.5%; RD, 15.8% [95% CI, 13.1%-18.5%]; RR, 2.0 [95% CI, 1.7-2.4]). The proportion of patients with low ferritin levels was significantly greater in the surgical group (26% vs 12%, P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: Among patients with severe obesity followed up for a median of 6.5 years, bariatric surgery compared with medical treatment was associated with a clinically important increased risk for complications, as well as lower risks of obesity-related comorbidities. The risk for complications should be considered in the decision-making process.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Bariatric Surgery
Obesity, Morbid/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Bariatric Surgery/adverse effects
Body Mass Index
Cohort Studies
Comorbidity
Depression/complications
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications
Female
Ferritins/blood
Humans
Hypertension/complications
Male
Middle Aged
Obesity, Morbid/drug therapy
Obesity, Morbid/surgery
Remission Induction
Treatment Outcome
[Pt] Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:9007-73-2 (Ferritins)
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180118
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1001/jama.2017.21055

  8 / 209873 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29273999
[Au] Autor:Hofker TO; Kaijser MA; Nieuwenhuijs VB; Lange JFM; Hofker HS
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, University Medical Center Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ, Groningen, the Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Distal Duodenogastrostomy or Proximal Jejunogastrostomy in the Management of Ultra-Short Bowel.
[So] Source:J Gastrointest Surg;22(3):538-543, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4626
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Inflammatory bowel disease, vascular disease, volvulus, adhesions, or abdominal trauma may necessitate extensive small-bowel resection resulting in an ultra-short distal duodenal or jejunal stump. If this distal duodenal or short jejunal stump is too short for stoma creation and bowel continuity restoration is hazardous or not possible at all, a distal duodenogastrostomy or proximal jejunogastrostomy in combination with drainage of the stomach is an option to prevent stump leakage. Although successful, this distal duodenogastrostomy has been described only in very few patients and in older records. We reintroduced this technique and describe a recent series of patients that confirms its usefulness in certain conditions. The technique of the distal duodenogastrostomy or proximal jejunogastrostomy with gastric drainage was used for the management of the difficult distal duodenum stump in five critically ill patients undergoing extensive bowel resection. Four patients with small-bowel ischemia and one patient suffering from perforating Crohn's disease and small-bowel volvulus were treated  successfully. The gastrostomies were subsequently converted to a duodenotransversostomy (in two patients) or the patients underwent small-bowel transplantation (two patients). One patient still has a jejunogastrostomy just after the duodenal-jejunal transition. In all five patients, the distal duodenogastrostomy or proximal jejunogastrostomy in combination with gastric drainage functioned well up to restoration of bowel continuity. In one patient, distal duodenogastrostomy and transabdominal gastric drainage functioned well for 5 years. No anastomotic leakage occurred. This procedure provides a feasible solution for an ultra-short bowel at emergency laparotomy. It enhances the surgical armamentarium and provides treatment options for these patients that were perhaps previously deemed unsalvageable.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11605-017-3654-0

  9 / 209873 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29248442
[Au] Autor:Radyk MD; Burclaff J; Willet SG; Mills JC
[Ad] Address:Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri.
[Ti] Title:Metaplastic Cells in the Stomach Arise, Independently of Stem Cells, via Dedifferentiation or Transdifferentiation of Chief Cells.
[So] Source:Gastroenterology;, 2017 Dec 14.
[Is] ISSN:1528-0012
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Spasmolytic polypeptide-expressing metaplasia (SPEM) develops in patients with chronic atrophic gastritis due to infection with Helicobacter pylori; it might be a precursor to intestinal metaplasia and gastric adenocarcinoma. Lineage tracing experiments of the gastric corpus in mice have not established whether SPEM derives from proliferating stem cells or differentiated, post-mitotic zymogenic chief cells in the gland base. We investigated whether differentiated cells can give rise to SPEM using a nongenetic approach in mice. Mice were given intraperitoneal injections of 5-fluorouracil, which blocked gastric cell proliferation, plus tamoxifen to induce SPEM. Based on analyses of molecular and histologic markers, we found SPEM developed even in the absence of cell proliferation. SPEM therefore did not arise from stem cells. In histologic analyses of gastric resection specimens from 10 patients with adenocarcinoma, we found normal zymogenic chief cells that were transitioning into SPEM cells only in gland bases, rather than the proliferative stem cell zone. Our findings indicate that SPEM can arise by direct reprogramming of existing cells-mainly of chief cells.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 209873 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 29522898
[Au] Autor:Grimm M; Koziolek M; Kühn JP; Weitschies W
[Ad] Address:Department of Biopharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology, Center of Drug Absorption and Transport, Ernst Moritz Arndt University of Greifswald, Greifswald, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Interindividual and intraindividual variability of fasted state gastric fluid volume and gastric emptying of water.
[So] Source:Eur J Pharm Biopharm;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3441
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The amount and composition of gastrointestinal media are crucial parameters in oral drug delivery. In fasted state, variable residual gastric volumes and gastric emptying behavior often cause variable drug release and absorption from oral drug products. Unfortunately, interindividual and intraindividual variability of the gastric conditions in fasted state are currently insufficiently mapped. In this work, datasets from 5 MRI studies with 16 treatments in total were pooled. The interindividual and intraindividual variability of residual gastric volumes after 10 h overnight fasting and the subsequent emptying of 240mL of water were compared in healthy human subjects under conditions mimicking clinical studies. This work shows that even under standardized clinical conditions, residual gastric volumes and water emptying are highly variable. Interestingly, interindividual and intraindividual variabilities of both parameters were comparable, suggesting that the variability within the studies was mainly resulting from intraindividual day-to-day variations. The mean resting volumes in all conducted investigations amounted to 25 ± 18 mL (n=120). Furthermore, 85±13% (n=22) of initially available gastric volume (resting volume plus 240 mL) was emptied after 30 min. The findings of this work will hopefully contribute to a better comprehension of the variability of oral drug release and absorption.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher


page 1 of 20988 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information