Database : MEDLINE
Search on : stomach and rupture [Words]
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  1 / 2016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29521950
[Au] Autor:Kanaan Z; Zhang A; Lilley K; Mutchnick M
[Ad] Address:Division of Gastroenterology Department of Medicine Wayne State University School of Medicine Detroit, MI Division of Gastroenterology Department of Medicine Wayne State University School of Medicine Detroit, MI John D. Dingell Veterans Affairs Medical Center Detroit, MI Division of Gastroenterology Department of Medicine Wayne State University School of Medicine Detroit, MI mmutchnick@med.wayne.edu.
[Ti] Title:Uncomplicated Spontaneous Rupture of a Pancreatic Pseudocyst Into the Stomach Through a Fistula: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.
[So] Source:Pancreas;47(4):e22-e24, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1536-4828
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/MPA.0000000000001013

  2 / 2016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519326
[Au] Autor:Braha J; Tenner S
[Ad] Address:Division of Gastroenterology, Mount Sinai Medical Center-Brooklyn, The Greater New York Endoscopy Surgical Center, 2211 Emmons Avenue, Brooklyn, NY 11235, USA.
[Ti] Title:Fluid Collections and Pseudocysts as a Complication of Acute Pancreatitis.
[So] Source:Gastrointest Endosc Clin N Am;28(2):123-130, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1558-1950
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pseudocysts evolve from fluid collections and/or disruptions of the pancreatic duct. They may occur secondary to acute pancreatitis, pancreatic trauma, or chronic pancreatitis. Lacking the clinical information, radiologists may inappropriately call a fluid collection or any cystic lesion a pseudocyst. With no clear history of acute pancreatitis or chronic pancreatitis, this is rare. Complications include infection, intracystic hemorrhage, or rupture. Pseudocysts can become painful, especially with chronic pancreatitis, and can cause early satiety and weight loss when their size affects the stomach and bowel. Symptomatic pseudocysts can successfully be drained with via surgical, radiologic, or endoscopic drainage.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 2016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28468689
[Au] Autor:De Silva WSL; Gamlaksha DS; Jayasekara DP; Rajamanthri SD
[Ad] Address:Post Graduate Institute of Medicine, University of Colombo, Colombo, Sri Lanka. supun85@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A splenic artery aneurysm presenting with multiple episodes of upper gastrointestinal bleeding: a case report.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;11(1):123, 2017 May 03.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Splenic artery aneurysm is rare and its diagnosis is challenging due to the nonspecific nature of the clinical presentation. We report a case of a splenic artery aneurysm in which the patient presented with chronic dyspepsia and multiple episodes of minor intragastric bleeding. CASE PRESENTATION: A 60-year-old, previously healthy Sri Lankan man presented with four episodes of hematemesis and severe dyspeptic symptoms over a period of 6 months. The results of two initial upper gastrointestinal endoscopies and an abdominal ultrasound scan were unremarkable. A third upper gastrointestinal endoscopy detected a pulsatile bulge at the posterior wall of the gastric antrum. A contrast-enhanced computed tomogram of his abdomen detected a splenic artery aneurysm measuring 3 × 3 × 2.5 cm. While awaiting routine surgery, he developed a torrential upper gastrointestinal bleeding and shock, leading to emergency laparotomy. Splenectomy and en bloc resection of the aneurysm with the posterior stomach wall were performed. Histology revealed evidence for a true aneurysm without overt, acute, or chronic inflammation of the surrounding gastric mucosa. He became completely asymptomatic 2 weeks after the surgery. CONCLUSIONS: Splenic artery aneurysms can result in recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding. The possibility of impending catastrophic bleeding should be remembered when managing patients with splenic artery aneurysms after a minor bleeding. Negative endoscopy and ultrasonography should require contrast-enhanced computed tomography to look for the cause of recurrent upper gastrointestinal bleeding.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Aneurysm, Ruptured/complications
Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage/etiology
Splenic Artery
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abdomen/diagnostic imaging
Aneurysm, Ruptured/diagnostic imaging
Aneurysm, Ruptured/surgery
Endoscopy, Gastrointestinal
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Splenectomy
Splenic Artery/diagnostic imaging
Splenic Artery/pathology
Stomach/surgery
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
Treatment Outcome
Ultrasonography
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-017-1282-7

  4 / 2016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28460582
[Au] Autor:Iguchi T; Niino N; Tamai S; Sakurai K; Mori K
[Ad] Address:1 Medicinal Safety Research Laboratories, Daiichi Sankyo Co, Ltd, Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Comprehensive Analysis of Circulating microRNA Specific to the Liver, Heart, and Skeletal Muscle of Cynomolgus Monkeys.
[So] Source:Int J Toxicol;36(3):220-228, 2017 May/Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1092-874X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) could represent sensitive and specific biomarkers for tissue injury. However, their utility as biomarkers in nonclinical toxicological studies using nonhuman primates is limited by a lack of information on their organ specificity and circulating levels under resting condition of the animals. Herein, liver, heart, and skeletal muscle-specific expression patterns of miRNAs were determined in 27 tissues/organs from male and female monkeys (n =2/sex) by next-generation sequencing (NGS) analysis. This analysis revealed organ-specific miRNAs in the liver (miR-122), heart (miR-208a and miR-499a), and skeletal muscle (miR-206). Next, plasma was collected from conscious-naive male and female cynomolgus monkeys (n = 25/sex) to better understand the expressions of organ-specific circulating miRNAs. The absolute values of circulating miRNAs were quantified using a Taqman microRNA assay. MiR-1, miR-133a, and miR-208b showed preferential expression in the heart and skeletal muscles, whereas miR-192 was abundant in the liver, stomach, small intestine, and kidney. These miRNAs had identical sequences to their human counterparts. Six organ-specific miRNAs (miR-1, miR-122, miR-133a, miR-192, miR-206, and miR-499a) could be evaluated quantitatively by quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction with or without preamplification. No significant sex differences were noted for these circulating miRNAs. For their circulation levels, miR-133a showed more than 900-fold interindividual variation, whereas miR-122 showed only a 20-fold variation. In conclusion, we profiled circulating organ-specific miRNAs for the liver, heart, and skeletal muscle of cynomolgus monkeys.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Circulating MicroRNA/genetics
Liver/metabolism
Muscle, Skeletal/metabolism
Myocardium/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Biomarkers/blood
Biomarkers/metabolism
Circulating MicroRNA/blood
Female
Heart Injuries/blood
Heart Injuries/genetics
Liver/injuries
Macaca fascicularis
Male
Muscle, Skeletal/injuries
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Sequence Analysis, RNA
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Circulating MicroRNA)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/1091581817704975

  5 / 2016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29427992
[Au] Autor:Jalbert B; Tran NT; von Düring S; Poletti PA; Fournier I; Hafner C; Dubost C; Gétaz L; Wolff H
[Ad] Address:Department of General Internal Medicine, Geneva University Hospitals and Faculty of Medicine, University of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Apple, condom, and cocaine - body stuffing in prison: a case report.
[So] Source:J Med Case Rep;12(1):35, 2018 Feb 11.
[Is] ISSN:1752-1947
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Drug dealers and drug users resort to body stuffing to hastily conceal illicit drugs by ingesting their drug packets. This practice represents a medical challenge because rupture of the often insecure packaging can be toxic and even lethal. In an emergency setting, official guidelines are needed to help the medical team decide on the proper treatment. A preliminary observation period is generally accepted but its duration varies from hours to eventual packet expulsion. CASE PRESENTATION: This case involves a 20-year-old white man in detention who claimed to have ingested one cocaine packet wrapped in plastic food-wrap and a condom in anticipation of an impending cell search. He reached out to medical professionals on day 4 after having unsuccessfully tried several methods to expel the drug packet, including swallowing olive oil, natural laxatives, liters of water, and 12 carved apple chunks. An initial computed tomography scan confirmed multiple packet-sized images throughout his stomach and bowel. After 24 hours of observation and normal bowel movements without expelling any packets, a subsequent scan found only one air-lined packet afloat in the gastric content. Due to the prolonged retention of the package there was an increased risk of rupture. The packet was eventually removed by laparoscopic gastrotomy. CONCLUSIONS: This case report illustrates that observation time needs to be adapted to each individual case of body stuffing. Proof of complete drug package evacuation ensures secure patient discharge. Body stuffers should be routinely asked for a detailed history, including how the drug is wrapped, and whether or not they ingested other substances to help expel the packets. The history enables the accurate interpretation of imaging. Repeated imaging can help follow the progress of packets if not all have been expelled during the observation period. Drug packets should be surgically removed in case of prolonged retention. To ensure the best possible outcomes, patients should have access to high-quality, private, and confidential medical care, which is equal to that offered to the general population. This is paramount to earning trust and collaboration from people in detention who resort to body stuffing.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180211
[Lr] Last revision date:180211
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s13256-018-1572-8

  6 / 2016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29178040
[Au] Autor:Sebrell TA; Sidar B; Bruns R; Wilkinson RA; Wiedenheft B; Taylor PJ; Perrino BA; Samuelson LC; Wilking JN; Bimczok D
[Ad] Address:Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Montana State University, 960 Technology Blvd., Bozeman, MT, 59717, USA.
[Ti] Title:Live imaging analysis of human gastric epithelial spheroids reveals spontaneous rupture, rotation and fusion events.
[So] Source:Cell Tissue Res;371(2):293-307, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0878
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Three-dimensional cultures of primary epithelial cells including organoids, enteroids and epithelial spheroids have become increasingly popular for studies of gastrointestinal development, mucosal immunology and epithelial infection. However, little is known about the behavior of these complex cultures in their three-dimensional culture matrix. Therefore, we performed extended time-lapse imaging analysis (up to 4 days) of human gastric epithelial spheroids generated from adult tissue samples in order to visualize the dynamics of the spheroids in detail. Human gastric epithelial spheroids cultured in our laboratory grew to an average diameter of 443.9 ± 34.6 µm after 12 days, with the largest spheroids reaching diameters of >1000 µm. Live imaging analysis revealed that spheroid growth was associated with cyclic rupture of the epithelial shell at a frequency of 0.32 ± 0.1/day, which led to the release of luminal contents. Spheroid rupture usually resulted in an initial collapse, followed by spontaneous re-formation of the spheres. Moreover, spheroids frequently rotated around their axes within the Matrigel matrix, possibly propelled by basolateral pseudopodia-like formations of the epithelial cells. Interestingly, adjacent spheroids occasionally underwent luminal fusion, as visualized by injection of individual spheroids with FITC-Dextran (4 kDa). In summary, our analysis revealed unexpected dynamics in human gastric spheroids that challenge our current view of cultured epithelia as static entities and that may need to be considered when performing spheroid infection experiments.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180128
[Lr] Last revision date:180128
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00441-017-2726-5

  7 / 2016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29341147
[Au] Autor:Boye K; Berner JM; Hompland I; Bruland ØS; Stoldt S; Sundby Hall K; Bjerkehagen B; Hølmebakk T
[Ad] Address:Department of Oncology, Oslo University Hospital, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
[Ti] Title:Genotype and risk of tumour rupture in gastrointestinal stromal tumour.
[So] Source:Br J Surg;105(2):e169-e175, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1365-2168
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Tumour rupture is a strong predictor of poor outcome in gastrointestinal stromal tumours (GISTs) of the stomach and small intestine. The objective was to determine whether tumour genotype was associated with risk of rupture. METHODS: Rupture was classified according to the definition proposed by the Oslo Sarcoma Group. Since January 2000, data were registered retrospectively for all patients at Oslo University Hospital undergoing surgery for localized GIST of the stomach or small intestine. Tumour genotype was analysed by Sanger sequencing. RESULTS: Two hundred and nine patients with mutation data available were identified. Tumour rupture occurred in 37 patients. Among the 155 patients with KIT exon 11 mutations, an increased risk of rupture was observed with a deletion or insertion-deletion (25 of 86, 29 per cent) compared with substitutions (5 of 50, 10 per cent) or duplications/insertions (2 of 19, 11 per cent) (P = 0·014). Notably, rupture occurred in 17 of 46 tumours (37 per cent) with deletions involving codons 557 and 558 (del557/558) versus 15 of 109 (13·8 per cent) with other exon 11 mutations (P = 0·002). This association was confined to gastric tumours: 12 of 34 (35 per cent) with del557/558 ruptured versus six of 77 (8 per cent) with other exon 11 mutations (P = 0·001). In multivariable logistic regression analysis, del557/558 and tumour size were associated with an increased likelihood of tumour rupture, but mitotic count was not. CONCLUSION: Gastric GISTs with KIT exon 11 deletions involving codons 557 and 558 are at increased risk of tumour rupture. This high-risk feature can be identified in the diagnostic evaluation and should be included in the assessment when neoadjuvant imatinib treatment is considered.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180117
[Lr] Last revision date:180117
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/bjs.10743

  8 / 2016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29175648
[Au] Autor:Luo XF; Zhou LH
[Ad] Address:School of Medicine, Yichun University, No. 576, Xuefu Road, Yichun, Jiangxi, China.
[Ti] Title:Prognostic significance of neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors: A meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Clin Chim Acta;477:7-12, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1873-3492
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The neutrophil to lymphocyte ratio (NLR) is reported to be a prognostic factor in multiple malignancies. However, its prognostic value in patients with gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) remains controversial. This study aims to evaluate the prognostic value of preoperative NLR in GISTs. METHODS: MEDLINE, EMBASE, and, Cochrane databases were searched until February 2017. Eligible articles were defined as studies assessing the prognostic role of preoperative NLR in GISTs. The end points were overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and clinicopathological parameters. Pooled hazard ratios (HRs) or odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated using fixed-effects/random-effects models. RESULTS: A total of eight studies comprising 1676 patients with GISTs were included. Elevated NLR had an association with decreased DFS/RFS (HR: 2.18, 95% CI: 1.30-3.67, P=0.003), but not OS (HR: 1.74, 95% CI: 0.63-4.84, P=0.29). The findings from most subgroup analyses were consistent with those from the overall analysis. Moreover, high NLR was significantly correlated with male, stomach lesion, tumor size (>5cm), tumor rupture (+), tumor recurrence (+), mitotic index (>5/50HPF), and NIH risk category (high/intermediate). CONCLUSIONS: Elevated preoperative NLR may be an unfavorable prognostic biomarker in patients with GISTs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 180116
[Lr] Last revision date:180116
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 2016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29130643
[Au] Autor:Zhang S; Huang W; Liu X; Li J
[Ad] Address:Department of Thoracic Surgery, Peking University First Hospital, Beijing, China.
[Ti] Title:Pilot study on preventing anastomotic leakage in stapled gastroesophageal anastomosis.
[So] Source:Thorac Cancer;, 2017 Nov 11.
[Is] ISSN:1759-7714
[Cp] Country of publication:Singapore
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: This study explored how to improve the surgical technique to reduce or avoid anastomotic leakage. METHODS: From January 2012 to December 2016, 101 consecutive patients with cancer of the esophagus or gastroesophageal junction underwent stapled gastroesophageal anastomosis. The procedure included creating a tube-type stomach, fixing an inserted anvil, inspecting mucosa-to-mucosa alignment in the lumen under direct vision after firing the stapler, and, if found, manually repairing a rupture of the mucous membrane of the anastomosis. RESULTS: A rupture of the mucous membrane of the anastomosis was found in four out of the 101 patients and manually repaired. No postsurgical anastomotic leakage occurred. All patients recovered well and the average postoperative stay was 10.4 days. There was no mortality within 30 days after surgery. CONCLUSION: It is critical to inspect the integrality of the luminal mucous membrane of the anastomosis under direct vision in order to prevent anastomotic leakage in surgical resection of esophageal and gastroesophageal junction malignancies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171113
[Lr] Last revision date:171113
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/1759-7714.12552

  10 / 2016 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29114486
[Au] Autor:Priya P; Veerakumari L
[Ad] Address:Department of Zoology, Unit of Parasitology, Pachaiyappa's College, Chennai, Tamil Nadu, India.
[Ti] Title:Morphological and histological analysis of treated with .
[So] Source:Trop Parasitol;7(2):92-97, 2017 Jul-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:2229-5070
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: Paramphistomosis (stomach fluke disease) is a parasitic infection caused by digenetic trematodes and is considered to be one of the most important parasitic diseases affecting livestock worldwide. This disease is widely prevalent in India, and the highest incidence is reported during monsoon and post-monsoon months. In the present study, effect of aqueous extract of pods of (AcP E) on the morphology and the histology of the digenetic trematode have been investigated. Materials and Methods: The effect of PE on the morphology and the histology of a digenetic trematode have been examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and light microscopic techniques. Results: The SEM micrograph of treated flukes showed the appearance of few blebs near the oral region and rupture of the dorsal surface of the tegument. The light and TEM observations revealed significant deleterious changes in the internal organization of the fluke. Severe injury to the tegument due to bleb formation, detachment of tubercles, and vacuolization of the subtegumental region was observed. Nuclear indentation, cytoplasmic autolysis, and mitochondrial abnormalities were the other prominent observations. Conclusion: The results of the present study convincingly showed that PE is an effective anthelmintic causing detrimental effect to and appears to be a potent phytotherapeutic agent to control paramphistomosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171110
[Lr] Last revision date:171110
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/tp.TP_65_16


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