Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29458538
[Au] Autor:Ma J; Yu L; Song B; Yu Y; Zhang S; Wei Y; Wu Z; Yao D; Yu W; Zhu Z; Cui Y
[Ad] Address:1​College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Heilongjiang Bayi Agricultural University, Daqing 163319, PR China.
[Ti] Title:The double adjuvants LTB and CpG significantly enhanced the immuno-protective effects of recombinant GIT derived from Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus in mice.
[So] Source:J Med Microbiol;67(3):432-440, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1473-5644
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: In this study, we prepared GapC1-150-IsdB126-361-TRAP (GIT) proteins plus heat-labile enterotoxin B (LTB) as an intra-molecular adjuvant, together with CpG to further enhance its immunogenicity. METHODOLOGY: Initially, the target genes were acquired and inserted into pET-32a (+) vectors to express LTB-GIT protein. LTB-GIT expression was confirmed by Western blotting and its immunocompetence was estimated through ELISA. Further, we immunized BALB/c mice with the LTB-GIT plus CpG adjuvant. After the second immunization, the antigen-specific CD4 cell responses for IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 were monitored by intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assay. After the third immunization, the level of IgG antibodies in the serum from immunized groups was assessed by ELISA, and the protective immune response was appraised by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus dysgalactiae challenge. RESULTS: The ELISA results showed that the OD450nm value of the LTB-GIT group was significantly higher than that of the BSA group. The group immunized with LTB-GIT plus CpG exhibited significantly stronger CD4 T cell responses for IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4 and IL-10 compared to the group immunized with LTB-GIT, GIT alone orLTB-GIT plus CpG. In addition, the group immunized with LTB-GIT plus CpG generated the highest level of IgG antibodies against GIT among all of the groups, and our results also showed that LTB-GIT plus CpG markedly improved the survival percentage of mice compared to other groups. CONCLUSION: We confirmed that the novel double adjuvants, LTB and CpG, are able to significantly improve GIT-induced immune responses. This formula could be a promising strategy for enhancing the immune efficacy of multi-subunit vaccines against Staphylococcus aureus and streptococcal infection.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adjuvants, Immunologic
Bacterial Toxins/immunology
Bacterial Vaccines/immunology
Enterotoxins/immunology
Oligodeoxyribonucleotides/immunology
Staphylococcus aureus/immunology
Streptococcus/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Antibodies, Bacterial/blood
Antigens, Bacterial/immunology
Bacterial Proteins/immunology
Bacterial Toxins/administration & dosage
Bacterial Toxins/genetics
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes
Enterotoxins/administration & dosage
Enterotoxins/genetics
Female
Interferon-gamma/immunology
Interleukin-10/immunology
Interleukin-2/immunology
Interleukin-4/immunology
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Oligodeoxyribonucleotides/genetics
Recombinant Proteins/genetics
Recombinant Proteins/immunology
Staphylococcal Infections/immunology
Staphylococcus aureus/chemistry
Streptococcal Infections/immunology
Streptococcus/chemistry
Vaccination
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Adjuvants, Immunologic); 0 (Antibodies, Bacterial); 0 (Antigens, Bacterial); 0 (Bacterial Proteins); 0 (Bacterial Toxins); 0 (Bacterial Vaccines); 0 (CPG-oligonucleotide); 0 (Enterotoxins); 0 (IL10 protein, mouse); 0 (Interleukin-2); 0 (Oligodeoxyribonucleotides); 0 (Recombinant Proteins); 130068-27-8 (Interleukin-10); 207137-56-2 (Interleukin-4); 82115-62-6 (Interferon-gamma)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1099/jmm.0.000666

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[PMID]: 28449969
[Au] Autor:Le Doare K; Faal A; Jaiteh M; Sarfo F; Taylor S; Warburton F; Humphries H; Birt J; Jarju S; Darboe S; Clarke E; Antonio M; Foster-Nyarko E; Heath PT; Gorringe A; Kampmann B
[Ad] Address:Centre for International Child Health, Imperial College London, Norfolk Place, London W2 1PG, UK,; Paediatric Infectious Diseases Research Group, St. George's University of London, Cranmer Terrace, London SW17 0TE, UK; Vaccines & Immunity Theme, MRC Unit The Gambia, Atlantic Road, Fajara, Gambia
[Ti] Title:Association between functional antibody against Group B Streptococcus and maternal and infant colonization in a Gambian cohort.
[So] Source:Vaccine;35(22):2970-2978, 2017 05 19.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2518
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Vertical transmission of Group B Streptococcus (GBS) is a prerequisite for early-onset disease and a consequence of maternal GBS colonization. Disease protection is associated with maternally-derived anti-GBS antibody. Using a novel antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition flow cytometry assay which correlates with opsonic killing we developed a model to assess the impact of maternally-derived functional anti-GBS antibody on infant GBS colonization from birth to day 60-89 of life. METHODS: Rectovaginal swabs and cord blood (birth) and infant nasopharyngeal/rectal swabs (birth, day 6 and day 60-89) were obtained from 750 mother/infant pairs. Antibody-mediated C3b/iC3b deposition with cord and infant sera was measured by flow cytometry. RESULTS: We established that as maternally-derived anti-GBS functional antibody increases, infant colonization decreases at birth and up to three months of life, the critical time window for the development of GBS disease. Further, we observed a serotype (ST)-dependent threshold above which no infant was colonized at birth. Functional antibody above the upper 95th confidence interval for the geometric mean concentration was associated with absence of infant GBS colonization at birth for STII (p<0.001), STIII (p=0.01) and STV (p<0.001). Increased functional antibody was also associated with clearance of GBS between birth and day 60-89. CONCLUSIONS: Higher concentrations of maternally-derived antibody-mediated complement deposition are associated with a decreased risk of GBS colonization in infants up to day 60-89 of life. Our findings are of relevance to establish thresholds for protection following vaccination of pregnant women with future GBS vaccines.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antibodies, Bacterial/immunology
Immunity, Maternally-Acquired
Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical
Streptococcal Infections/immunology
Streptococcus/growth & development
Streptococcus/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Antibodies, Bacterial/blood
Carrier State
Child
Child, Preschool
Cohort Studies
Complement C3b/immunology
Female
Fetal Blood/immunology
Flow Cytometry
Gambia/epidemiology
Humans
Immunologic Techniques
Infant
Infant, Newborn
Longitudinal Studies
Mothers
Nasopharynx/microbiology
Opsonin Proteins
Pregnancy
Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/microbiology
Streptococcal Infections/epidemiology
Streptococcal Infections/transmission
Streptococcus/classification
Streptococcus/isolation & purification
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Bacterial); 0 (Opsonin Proteins); 80295-43-8 (Complement C3b)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29363210
[Au] Autor:Chan WY; Hickey EE; Khazandi M; Page SW; Trott DJ; Hill PB
[Ad] Address:Australian Centre for Antimicrobial Resistance Ecology, School of Animal and Veterinary Sciences, The University of Adelaide, Roseworthy, SA, 5371, Australia.
[Ti] Title:In vitro antimicrobial activity of narasin against common clinical isolates associated with canine otitis externa.
[So] Source:Vet Dermatol;29(2):149-e57, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3164
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Antimicrobial resistance and antimicrobial stewardship are of ever-increasing importance in veterinary medicine. Re-purposing of old drugs that are not used in human medicine is one approach that addresses the emergence of multidrug resistance in canine skin and ear infections, and can reduce the use of critically important human antibiotic classes. HYPOTHESIS/OBJECTIVES: To determine the antimicrobial activity of narasin, a polyether ionophore conventionally used as a rumen modifier and anticoccidial agent in production animals, against common clinical isolates of canine otitis externa (OE). ANIMALS/ISOLATES: Clinical isolates (n = 110) from canine OE were tested, including 17 meticillin-susceptible Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MSSP), 13 multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus pseudintermedius (MDRSP), and 20 each of -haemolytic Streptococcus spp., Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Proteus mirabilis and Malassezia pachydermatis. METHODS: Bacterial and yeast isolates were subcultured, suspended in broth and inoculated into 96-well plates. Organisms were tested against concentrations of narasin ranging from 0.03 to 128 g/mL. Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined after overnight incubation. RESULTS: Narasin MICs for staphylococcal and streptococcal isolates ranged from 0.06 to 0.25 g/mL; MIC and MIC values for both organisms were 0.125 g/mL. No MICs were achieved for Pseudomonas or Proteus isolates. There was a weak antifungal effect against M. pachydermatis isolates (MIC 32 to >128 g/mL). CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Narasin was effective against Gram-positive bacteria and had antifungal activity at higher concentrations against M. pachydermatis. However, the lack of Gram-negative activity would prevent its use as a sole antimicrobial agent in cases of canine OE.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/vde.12516

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[PMID]: 29211672
[Au] Autor:Stevens DL; Bryant AE
[Ad] Address:From the Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Boise, ID; and the University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle.
[Ti] Title:Necrotizing Soft-Tissue Infections.
[So] Source:N Engl J Med;377(23):2253-2265, 2017 Dec 07.
[Is] ISSN:1533-4406
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Debridement
Fasciitis, Necrotizing
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal/adverse effects
Biomarkers/blood
Biopsy
C-Reactive Protein/analysis
Critical Illness
Fasciitis, Necrotizing/diagnosis
Fasciitis, Necrotizing/etiology
Fasciitis, Necrotizing/pathology
Fasciitis, Necrotizing/therapy
Gas Gangrene
Humans
Hyperbaric Oxygenation
Immunoglobulins, Intravenous/therapeutic use
Soft Tissue Infections
Streptococcal Infections/chemically induced
Streptococcus pyogenes
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Anti-Inflammatory Agents, Non-Steroidal); 0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Immunoglobulins, Intravenous); 9007-41-4 (C-Reactive Protein)
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171207
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1056/NEJMra1600673

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[PMID]: 29509833
[Au] Autor:Jauneikaite E; Kapatai G; Davies F; Gozar I; Coelho J; Bamford KB; Simone B; Begum L; Katiyo S; Patel B; Hoffman P; Lamagni T; Brannigan ET; Holmes A; Kadhani T; Galletly T; Martin K; Lyall H; Chow Y; Godambe S; Chalker V; Sriskandan S
[Ad] Address:Health Protection Research Unit in Healthcare Associated Infections and Antimicrobial Resistance, Imperial College London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Serial Clustering of Late Onset Group B Streptococcal Infections in the Neonatal Unit - a Genomic Re-Evaluation of Causality.
[So] Source:Clin Infect Dis;, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6591
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Invasive Group B streptococcus (GBS) is a major cause of serious neonatal infection. Current strategies to reduce early onset GBS disease have no impact on late onset disease (LOD). Although GBS is a normal part of the enteric microbiota in healthy term infants, LOD cases arising in the neonatal intensive care unit setting raise questions about mode of acquisition. Methods: Enhanced surveillance for any case of late onset GBS sepsis admitted to a level 3, 24-bed neonatal intensive care unit over a 2 year period was instituted following a cluster of four cases. All late onset GBS isolates were serotyped and genomes sequenced. Rectal screening of neonates for GBS was undertaken weekly. Healthcare workers and parents were not screened. Results: Over 24 months, a total of 12 late onset invasive GBS episodes were identified (incidence 0.6/1000 live births). Genomic analysis revealed that 11/12 GBS isolates (92%) were linked to at least one other LOD isolate. Four isolates from the first cluster were serotype V, resistant to macrolides and lincosamides, providing early evidence of a common source. Sequencing confirmed isolates were indistinguishable, or distinguishable by 1 SNP, from each other, and distinct from contemporary serotype V GBS. Although a common environmental source was not identified, prompt infection prevention interventions were instituted and no further serotype V GBS infections arose. Prospective surveillance identified three further clusters of LOD due to serotypes Ia, Ib, and III, leading to re-evaluation of interventions required for preventing GBS LOD. Conclusion: Acquisition routes for LOD GBS in the neonatal unit are poorly understood; such cases may not necessarily be sporadic. Within this neonatal unit, our data suggest that a single case of LOD GBS sepsis should be considered a potential nosocomial transmission event warranting prompt investigation, heightened infection prevention vigilance and action where required.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/cid/ciy174

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[PMID]: 29509649
[Au] Autor:Akinkugbe O; Stewart C; McKenna C
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Pediatric Emergency Medicine, Chelsea and Westminster NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom.
[Ti] Title:Presentation and Investigation of Pediatric Bone and Joint Infections in the Pediatric Emergency Department.
[So] Source:Pediatr Emerg Care;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1535-1815
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the presenting features of bone and joint infections with a view to identify distinguishing trends that will be useful for pediatric emergency departments. METHODS: We performed a retrospective review of patient records over a 12-year period in the pediatric emergency department of a large regional pediatric teaching center serving a diverse population. RESULTS: There were 88 cases of osteoarticular infections during the study period. Pain, fever, and impaired function were commonly reported, but overall, there was inconsistency in the presenting features. Inflammatory makers were sensitive tools, particularly in combination. When C-reactive protein, total white cell count, and erythrocyte sedimentation rate were all abnormal, 98% of bone and joint infections were identified.Causative organisms were identified in only 38% of cases, mostly from cultures of synovial fluid and bone. Streptococcal organisms were significantly more likely to be isolated in children under 5 years than in children over 5 years (P = <0.014). Staphylococcal organisms were significantly more likely to be isolated in children over 5 years than in children under 5 years (P = <0.001). Identification of virulent organisms such as Panton-Valentine leukocidin Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus in our study should prompt review of diagnostic techniques and antibiotic choices. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, children under 5 years were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with septic arthritis than osteomyelitis (P = 0. 006). Children over 12 years were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with osteomyelitis than septic arthritis (P = 0. 019). These trends are useful to consider at presentation and in cases of diagnostic uncertainty.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/PEC.0000000000001431

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[PMID]: 29228173
[Au] Autor:Frost HR; Sanderson-Smith M; Walker M; Botteaux A; Smeesters PR
[Ad] Address:Molecular Bacteriology Laboratory, Universit Libre de Bruxelles, Brussels 1070, Belgium.
[Ti] Title:Group A streptococcal M-like proteins: From pathogenesis to vaccine potential.
[So] Source:FEMS Microbiol Rev;42(2):193-204, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1574-6976
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:M and M-like surface proteins from group A Streptococcus (GAS) act as virulence factors and have been used in multiple vaccine candidates. While the M protein has been extensively studied, the two genetically and functionally related M-like proteins, Mrp and Enn, although present in most streptococcal strains have been relatively less characterised. We compile the current state of knowledge for these two proteins, from discovery to recent studies on function and immunogenicity, using the M protein for comparison as a prototype of this family of proteins. We focus on the known interactions between M-like proteins and host ligand proteins, and analyse the genetic data supporting these interactions. We discuss known and possible functions of M-like proteins during GAS infections, and highlight knowledge gaps where further investigation is warranted.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/femsre/fux057

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[PMID]: 28448633
[Au] Autor:Scoffield JA; Duan D; Zhu F; Wu H
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Dentistry, School of Dentistry, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:A commensal streptococcus hijacks a Pseudomonas aeruginosa exopolysaccharide to promote biofilm formation.
[So] Source:PLoS Pathog;13(4):e1006300, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1553-7374
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Pseudomonas aeruginosa causes devastating chronic pulmonary infections in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. Although the CF airway is inhabited by diverse species of microorganisms interlaced within a biofilm, many studies focus on the sole contribution of P. aeruginosa pathogenesis in CF morbidity. More recently, oral commensal streptococci have been identified as cohabitants of the CF lung, but few studies have explored the role these bacteria play within the CF biofilm. We examined the interaction between P. aeruginosa and oral commensal streptococci within a dual species biofilm. Here we report that the CF P. aeruginosa isolate, FRD1, enhances biofilm formation and colonization of Drosophila melanogaster by the oral commensal Streptococcus parasanguinis. Moreover, production of the P. aeruginosa exopolysaccharide, alginate, is required for the promotion of S. parasanguinis biofilm formation and colonization. However, P. aeruginosa is not promoted in the dual species biofilm. Furthermore, we show that the streptococcal adhesin, BapA1, mediates alginate-dependent enhancement of the S. parasanguinis biofilm in vitro, and BapA1 along with another adhesin, Fap1, are required for the in vivo colonization of S. parasanguinis in the presence of FRD1. Taken together, our study highlights a new association between streptococcal adhesins and P. aeruginosa alginate, and reveals a mechanism by which S. parasanguinis potentially colonizes the CF lung and interferes with the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biofilms
Cystic Fibrosis/microbiology
Polysaccharides, Bacterial/metabolism
Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology
Pseudomonas aeruginosa/physiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adhesins, Bacterial/genetics
Adhesins, Bacterial/metabolism
Animals
Drosophila melanogaster
Humans
Pseudomonas aeruginosa/genetics
Pseudomonas aeruginosa/growth & development
Pseudomonas aeruginosa/isolation & purification
Respiratory System/microbiology
Symbiosis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Adhesins, Bacterial); 0 (Polysaccharides, Bacterial); 128531-82-8 (exopolysaccharide, Pseudomonas)
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170428
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.ppat.1006300

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[PMID]: 29495215
[Au] Autor:Hong X; Yu H; Wang B
[Ad] Address:Department of Epidemiology and Health Statistics, School of Public Health, Southeast University; Key Laboratory of Environmental Medicine Engineering of Ministry of Education, Nanjing 210009, China.
[Ti] Title:[Progress on influencing factors regarding the neonatal group B streptococcal infectious diseases].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Liu Xing Bing Xue Za Zhi;39(2):249-252, 2018 Feb 10.
[Is] ISSN:0254-6450
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:Group B streptococcus (GBS) is one of the severe pathogenic bacteria during the perinatal period, both on pregnant women and newborns. GBS infection may lead to pneumonia, septicemia, meningitis or other severe disease, even death in neonates. Although only 1%-2% infections will develop into GBS disease among the neonates, the etiological mechanism of which is worth researching. This review summarizes the possible factors related to GBS infection or occurrence of the disease, including the risk in gestation period (for example, colonization of GBS on vagina of pregnant women, preterm birth or premature rupture of fetal membranes and so on), related pathogens (bacteria strains, loads or virulence), immune level (inflammatory factor or neutralizing anticytokine auto-Abs), gene defect or primary immunodeficiencies of the hosts.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180301
[Lr] Last revision date:180301
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.0254-6450.2018.02.022

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[PMID]: 28460559
[Au] Autor:Mani RJ; Thachil AJ; Ramachandran A
[Ad] Address:Oklahoma Animal Disease Diagnostic Laboratory, Oklahoma State University, Stillwater, OK (Mani, Ramachandran).
[Ti] Title:Discrimination of Streptococcus equi subsp. equi and Streptococcus equi subsp. zooepidemicus using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.
[So] Source:J Vet Diagn Invest;29(5):622-627, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1943-4936
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Accurate and timely identification of infectious etiologies is of great significance in veterinary microbiology, especially for critical diseases such as strangles, a highly contagious disease of horses caused by Streptococcus equi subsp. equi. We evaluated a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) platform for use in species- and subspecies-level identification of S. equi isolates from horses and compared it with an automated biochemical system. We used 25 clinical isolates each of S. equi subsp. equi and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus. Using the MALDI-TOF MS platform, it was possible to correctly identify all 50 isolates to the species level. Unique mass peaks were identified in the bacterial peptide mass spectra generated by MALDI-TOF MS, which can be used for accurate subspecies-level identification of S. equi. Mass peaks (mass/charge, m/ z) 6,751.9 1.4 (mean standard deviation) and 5,958.1 1.3 were found to be unique to S. equi subsp. equi and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus, respectively. The automated biochemical system correctly identified 47 of 50 of the isolates to the species level as S. equi, whereas at the subspecies level, 24 of 25 S. equi subsp. equi isolates and 22 of 25 S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus isolates were correctly identified. Our results indicate that MALDI-TOF MS can be used for accurate species- and subspecies-level identification of S. equi.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Horse Diseases/diagnosis
Spectrometry, Mass, Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization/veterinary
Streptococcal Infections/veterinary
Streptococcus equi/classification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Horse Diseases/microbiology
Horses
Species Specificity
Streptococcal Infections/diagnosis
Streptococcal Infections/microbiology
Streptococcus equi/isolation & purification
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170503
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/1040638717702687


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