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[PMID]: 29098693
[Au] Autor:Xiao Q; Wang F; Luo Y; Chen L; Chao F; Tan C; Gao Y; Huang C; Zhang L; Liang X; Tang J; Qi Y; Jiang L; Zhang Y; Zhou C; Tang Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Histology and Embryology, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing 400016, P.R. China.
[Ti] Title:Exercise Protects Myelinated Fibers of White Matter in a Rat Model of Depression.
[So] Source:J Comp Neurol;, 2017 Nov 03.
[Is] ISSN:1096-9861
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The antidepressive effects of exercise have been a focus of research and are hypothesized to remodel the brain networks constructed by myelinated fibers. However, whether the antidepressant effects of exercise are dependent on changes in white matter myelination are unknown. Therefore, we chose chronic unpredictable stress (CUS) as a model of depression and designed an experiment. After a 4-week CUS period, 40 animals were tested using the sucrose preference test (SPT) and the open field test (OFT). The depressed rats then underwent 4-week running exercise. Next, electron microscopy and unbiased stereological methods were used to investigate white matter changes in the rats. After the 4-week CUS stimulation, body weight, sucrose preference and scores on the OFT were significantly lower in the depression rats than in the unstressed rats (p<0.05). After undergoing a 4-week running exercise, the depression rats showed a significantly greater sucrose preference than the depression control rats without running exercise (p<0.05). Furthermore, the white matter parameters of the depression rats (including the white matter volumes, the length and volumes of myelinated fibers, and the volumes and thickness of the myelin sheaths) were significantly reduced after the CUS period (p<0.05). However, these white matter parameters were significantly increased after running exercise (p<0.05). The present study is the first to provide evidence that running exercise has positive effects on white matter and the myelinated fibers of white matter in depressed rats, and this evidence might provide an important theoretical basis for the exercise-mediated treatment of depression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/cne.24350

  2 / 72040 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29098644
[Au] Autor:Haznar-Garbacz D; Kaminska E; Zakowiecki D; Lachmann M; Kaminski K; Garbacz G; Dorozynski P; Kulinowski P
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Pharmacy, Department of Drug Form Technology, Wroclaw Medical University, Borowska 211A, 50-556, Wroclaw, Poland. dorota.haznar-garbacz@umed.wroc.pl.
[Ti] Title:Melts of Octaacetyl Sucrose as Oral-Modified Release Dosage Forms for Delivery of Poorly Soluble Compound in Stable Amorphous Form.
[So] Source:AAPS PharmSciTech;, 2017 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:1530-9932
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The presented work describes the formulation and characterization of modified release glassy solid dosage forms (GSDFs) containing an amorphous nifedipine, as a model BCS (Biopharmaceutical Classification System) class II drug. The GSDFs were prepared by melting nifedipine together with octaacetyl sucrose. Dissolution profiles, measured under standard and biorelevant conditions, were compared to those obtained from commercially available formulations containing nifedipine such as modified release (MR) tablets and osmotic release oral system (OROS). The results indicate that the dissolution profiles of the GSDFs with nifedipine are neither affected by the pH of the dissolution media, type and concentration of surfactants, nor by simulated mechanical stress of biorelevant intensity. Furthermore, it was found that the dissolution profiles of the novel dosage forms were similar to the profiles obtained from the nifedipine OROS. The formulation of GSDFs is relatively simple, and the dosage forms were found to have favorable dissolution characteristics.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1208/s12249-017-0912-0

  3 / 72040 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29097916
[Au] Autor:Gallivanone F; Carne I; Interlenghi M; D'Ambrosio D; Baldi M; Fantinato D; Castiglioni I
[Ad] Address:Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology, National Research Council (IBFM-CNR), Milan, Italy.
[Ti] Title:A Method for Manufacturing Oncological Phantoms for the Quantification of 18F-FDG PET and DW-MRI Studies.
[So] Source:Contrast Media Mol Imaging;2017:3461684, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1555-4317
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this work was to develop a method to manufacture oncological phantoms for quantitation purposes in 18F-FDG PET and DW-MRI studies. Radioactive and diffusion materials were prepared using a mixture of agarose and sucrose radioactive gels. T2 relaxation and diffusion properties of gels at different sucrose concentrations were evaluated. Realistic oncological lesions were created using 3D-printed plastic molds filled with the gel mixture. Once solidified, gels were extracted from molds and immersed in a low-radioactivity gel simulating normal background tissue. A breast cancer phantom was manufactured using the proposed method as an exploratory feasibility study, including several realistic oncological configurations in terms of both radioactivity and diffusion. The phantom was acquired in PET with 18F-FDG, immediately after solidification, and in DW-MRI the following day. Functional volumes characterizing the simulated BC lesions were segmented from PET and DW-MRI images. Measured radioactive uptake and ADC values were compared with gold standards. Phantom preparation was straightforward, and the time schedule was compatible with both PET and MRI measurements. Lesions appeared on 18F-FDG PET and DW-MRI images as expected, without visible artifacts. Lesion functional parameters revealed the phantom's potential for validating quantification methods, in particular for new generation hybrid PET-MRI systems.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1155/2017/3461684

  4 / 72040 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29097161
[Au] Autor:Moore CF; Schlain GS; Mancino S; Sabino V; Cottone P
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Addictive Disorders, Departments of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics and Psychiatry, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA; Graduate Program for Neuroscience, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA, USA.
[Ti] Title:A behavioral and pharmacological characterization of palatable diet alternation in mice.
[So] Source:Pharmacol Biochem Behav;, 2017 Oct 30.
[Is] ISSN:1873-5177
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Obesity and eating disorders are widespread in Western societies. Both the increased availability of highly palatable foods and dieting are major risk factors contributing to the epidemic of disorders of feeding. The purpose of this study was to characterize an animal model of maladaptive feeding induced by intermittent access to a palatable diet alternation in mice. In this study, mice were either continuously provided with standard chow food (Chow/Chow), or provided with standard chow for 2days and a high-sucrose, palatable food for 1day (Chow/Palatable). Following stability of intake within the cycling paradigm, we then investigated the effects of several pharmacological treatments on excessive eating of palatable food: naltrexone, an opioid receptor antagonist, SR141716A, a cannabinoid-1 receptor antagonist/inverse agonist, and BD-1063, a sigma-1 receptor antagonist. Over successive cycles, Chow/Palatable mice showed an escalation of palatable food intake within the first hour of renewed access to palatable diet and displayed hypophagia upon its removal. Naltrexone, SR141716A, and BD-1063 all reduced overconsumption of palatable food during this first hour. Here we provide evidence of strong face and convergent validity in a palatable diet alternation model in mice, confirming multiple shared underlying mechanisms of pathological eating across species, and thus making it a useful therapeutic development tool.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 72040 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29097122
[Au] Autor:Akabane STF; Delbem ACB; Pessan JP; Garcia LSG; Emerenciano NG; Gonçalves DFM; Danelon M
[Ad] Address:São Paulo State University (Unesp), School of Dentistry, Araçatuba Department of Pediatric Dentistry and Public Health, Rua José Bonifácio 1193, Araçatuba, SP, Cep 16015-050, Brazil.
[Ti] Title:In situ effect of the combination of fluoridated toothpaste and fluoridated gel containing sodium trimetaphosphate on enamel demineralization.
[So] Source:J Dent;, 2017 Oct 30.
[Is] ISSN:1879-176X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: This in situ study evaluated the effect of the association of low-F (4,500µg F/g) gel containing TMP and FT (1,100µg F/g) on enamel demineralization. METHODS: This crossover and double-blind study consisted of five phases of seven days each. Volunteers (n=12) wore palatal appliances containing four enamel blocks. The cariogenic challenge was performed with 30% sucrose solution (six times/day). Treatments were: placebo toothpaste (PT, no fluoride/TMP); 1,100µg F/g toothpaste (FT); FT+4,500µg F/g+5%TMP gel (FT+TMP gel); FT+9,000µg F/g gel (FT+9,000 gel) and FT+12,300µg F/g (FT+Acid gel). After topical application of treatments for one min, two blocks were removed for analysis of loosely bound fluoride (CaF ), calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P) and firmly bound fluoride (FA) formed in enamel. After the seven-day experimental periods, the percentage of surface hardness loss (%SH), integrated subsurface hardness loss (ΔKHN), CaF , Ca, P and FA retained were determined. Moreover, the biofilms formed on the blocks were analyzed for F, Ca, P and insoluble extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) concentrations. RESULTS: FT+TMP gel promoted the lowest %SH and ΔKHN (p<0.001). The highest concentration of CaF formed was observed for the FT+Acid gel (p<0.001), followed by FT+9,000 gel > FT+TMP gel > FT > PT. CaF retained on the blocks was reduced across all groups (p<0.001). Similar values were observed for the Ca/P/F and EPS in enamel and biofilm for all fluoride groups. CONCLUSION: The association of FT+TMP gel significantly reduced enamel demineralization in situ. CLINICAL SIGNIFICANCE: The association of treatments may be an alternative for patients with high caries risk.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher

  6 / 72040 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29096730
[Au] Autor:Stephenson K; Kennedy L; Hargrove L; Demieville J; Thomson J; Alpini G; Francis H
[Ad] Address:Scott & White Digestive Disease Research Center, Baylor Scott & White Health, Temple, Texas, USA.
[Ti] Title:Updates on Dietary Models of Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Current Studies and Insights.
[So] Source:Gene Expr;, 2017 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:1052-2166
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is a disease of increasing interest as its prevalence is on the rise. NAFLD has been linked to metabolic syndrome, which is becoming more common due to the Western diet. Since NAFLD can lead to cirrhosis and related complications including hepatocellular carcinoma, the increasing prevalence is concerning and medical therapy aimed at treating NAFLD is of great interest. Researchers studying the effects of medical therapy on NAFLD use dietary mouse models. The two main types of mouse model diets are the methionine- and cholinedeficient (MCD) diet and Western-like Diet (WD). Although both induce NAFLD, the mechanisms are very different. We reviewed several studies conducted within the last 5 years that use MCD diet or WD mouse models in order to mimic this disease in a way most similar to humans. The MCD diet inconsistently induces NAFLD and fibrosis and doesn't completely induce metabolic syndrome. Thus, the clinical significance of the MCD diet is questionable. In contrast, WD mouse models consisting of high fat, cholesterol, and a combination of high fructose corn syrup, sucrose, fructose or glucose not only lead to metabolic syndrome but also induce NAFLD with fibrosis making these choices most suitable for research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171103
[Lr] Last revision date:171103
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.3727/105221617X15093707969658

  7 / 72040 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29095985
[Au] Autor:Ahmadpour F; Yakhchali B
[Ad] Address:National Institute of Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology, Tehran, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Development of an asporogenic Bacillus cereus strain to improve keratinase production in exponential phase by switching sigmaH on and sigmaF off.
[So] Source:FEMS Microbiol Lett;, 2017 Oct 31.
[Is] ISSN:1574-6968
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Many bacteria, including the genus Bacillus are able to produce proteases (keratinase). In Bacillus, proteases are produced in the stationary phase and initial stages of sporulation. Protease production is coordinated with sporulation in which expression of various genes by different sigma factors manages the transition from exponential to the stationary phase. In the present study the sigma-F gene of an indigenous Bacillus cereus strain, which is involved in transcription of maintaining sporulation genes was deleted. Meanwhil the sigma-H, which its product activates the genes that function in the zero phase of sporulation and inhibits suppression of protease production, and spo0B genes were expressed in the exponential phase under the control of a sucrose inducible promoter from Bacillus sacPA operon. For the first time, an asporogenic strain of B. cereus was generated that produced higher keratinase (390 U in compare to the 198 U of wild strain) and protease (450 U in compare to the 290 U of wild strain) activities in the exponential growth phase by induction with sucrose. The new strain is promising for production of keratinase for degradation of feather waste to produce feather meal for poultry feed and decrease environmental pollution of poultry industry.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/femsle/fnx216

  8 / 72040 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29094495
[Au] Autor:de Dios Barajas-Lopez J; Moreno JR; Gamez-Arjona FM; Pardo JM; Punkkinen M; Zhu JK; Quintero FJ; Fujii H
[Ad] Address:Molecular Plant Biology Unit, Department of Biochemistry, University of Turku, 20014, Turku, Finland.
[Ti] Title:Upstream kinases of plant SnRKs are involved in salt stress tolerance.
[So] Source:Plant J;, 2017 Nov 01.
[Is] ISSN:1365-313X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sucrose-Non-Fermenting1-related protein kinases (SnRKs) are important for plant growth and stress responses. This family has three clades: SnRK1, SnRK2, and SnRK3. Although plant SnRKs are thought to be activated by upstream kinases, the overall mechanism remains obscure. Geminivirus Rep-Interacting Kinase (GRIK)1 and GRIK2 phosphorylate SnRK1s, which are involved in sugar/energy sensing, and the grik1-1 grik2-1 double mutant shows growth retardation under regular growth conditions. In this study, we established another Arabidopsis mutant line harbouring a different allele of gene GRIK1 (grik1-2 grik2-1) that grows similarly to the wild type, enabling us to evaluate the function of GRIKs under stress conditions. In the grik1-2 grik2-1 double mutant, phosphorylation of SnRK1.1 was reduced, but not eliminated, suggesting that the grik1-2 mutation is a weak allele. In addition to high sensitivity to glucose, the grik1-2 grik2-1 mutant was sensitive to high salt, indicating that GRIKs are also involved in salinity signalling pathways. Salt Overly Sensitive (SOS)2, a member of the SnRK3 subfamily, is a critical mediator of the response to salinity. GRIK1 phosphorylated SOS2 in vitro, resulting in elevated kinase activity of SOS2. The salt tolerance of sos2 was restored to normal levels by wild-type SOS2, but not by a mutated form of SOS2 lacking the T168 residue phosphorylated by GRIK1. Activation of SOS2 by GRIK1 was also demonstrated in a reconstituted system in yeast. Our results indicate that GRIKs phosphorylate and activate SnRK1 and other members of the SnRK3 family and that they play important roles in multiple signalling pathways in vivo. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/tpj.13761

  9 / 72040 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29094353
[Au] Autor:Locke AM; Barding GA; Sathnur S; Larive CK; Bailey-Serres J
[Ad] Address:Center for Plant Cell Biology, University of California, Riverside, California, USA, 92521.
[Ti] Title:Rice SUB1A constrains remodeling of the transcriptome and metabolome during submergence to facilitate post-submergence recovery.
[So] Source:Plant Cell Environ;, 2017 Nov 02.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3040
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The rice (Oryza sativa L.) ethylene-responsive transcription factor gene SUB1A-1 confers tolerance to prolonged, complete submergence by limiting underwater elongation growth. Upon desubmergence, SUB1A-1 genotypes rapidly recover photosynthetic function and re-commence development towards flowering. The underpinnings of the transition from stress amelioration to the return to homeostasis are not well known. Here, transcriptomic and metabolomic analyses were conducted to identify mechanisms by which SUB1A improves physiological function over the 24 hours following a sub-lethal submergence event. Evaluation of near-isogenic genotypes after submergence and over a day of re-aeration demonstrated that SUB1A transiently constrains the remodeling of cellular activities associated with growth. SUB1A influenced the abundance of ca. 1400 transcripts and had a continued impact on metabolite content, particularly free amino acids, glucose, and sucrose, throughout the recovery period. SUB1A promoted recovery of metabolic homeostasis but had limited influence on mRNAs associated with growth processes and photosynthesis. The involvement of low energy sensing during submergence and recovery was supported by dynamics in trehalose-6-phosphate (T6P) and mRNAs encoding key enzymes and signaling proteins, which were modulated by SUB1A. This study provides new evidence of convergent signaling pathways critical to the rapidly reversible management of carbon and nitrogen metabolism in submergence resilient rice.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/pce.13094

  10 / 72040 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29093290
[Au] Autor:Kakino Y; Hishikawa Y; Onodera R; Tahara K; Takeuchi H
[Ad] Address:Department of Research and Development, Ohkura Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd.
[Ti] Title:Gelation Factors of Pectin for Development of a Powder Form of Gel, Dry Jelly, as a Novel Dosage Form.
[So] Source:Chem Pharm Bull (Tokyo);65(11):1035-1044, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1347-5223
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Jellies for oral administration are dosage forms that contain water, as stipulated in the Japanese Pharmacopeia, and heat is generally applied to the jellies during the manufacturing process. Therefore, it is difficult to formulate drugs that may be affected adversely by water and/or heat. To solve this problem, we tried to develop a powder form of gel as a novel dosage form (dry jelly: jelly medicine extemporaneously prepared) that is converted to jelly after addition of water at the time of administration. For this purpose, a basic gel formulation consisting of pectin, glucono-δ-lactone, dibasic calcium phosphate hydrate, and sucrose was investigated to evaluate the critical factors affecting gelation phenomena. The gel form was developed by adjusting the amount of each component of the formulation and of water added. Gelation occurred even with hard water containing metal ions (hardness of approximately 304 mg/L), and no changes in gel hardness occurred. The desired gel hardness could be controlled by adjusting the amount of water. The gel hardness changed over time after the addition of water, but this change did not affect the dissolution behavior of drugs formulated in the dry jelly.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1711
[Cu] Class update date: 171102
[Lr] Last revision date:171102
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1248/cpb.c17-00447


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