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[PMID]: 25263939
[Au] Autor:Krings JG; Kallogjeri D; Wineland A; Nepple KG; Piccirillo JF; Getz AE
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, Saint Louis, Missouri; Stanford Medical Scholars Fellowship, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
[Ti] Title:Complications following primary and revision transsphenoidal surgeries for pituitary tumors.
[So] Source:Laryngoscope;125(2):311-7, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1531-4995
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: This study aimed to determine the incidence of major complications following both primary and revision transsphenoidal pituitary surgery. Major complications included endocrinopathic, skull base, orbital, hemorrhagic and thromboembolic complications, respiratory failure, and death. Secondarily, this study aimed to examine factors associated with the occurrence of complications. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective cohort analysis of California and Florida all-payer databases from 2005 to 2008. METHODS: The major complication rate following both primary and revision transsphenoidal pituitary surgery was calculated. Bivariate analyses were performed to investigate the relationship of patient characteristics with complication occurrence, and a multivariate model was constructed to determine risk factors associated with these complications. RESULTS: There were 5,277 primary cases and 192 revision cases that met inclusion criteria. There was a nonsignificant absolute difference of 3.09% (95% confidence interval [CI]: -11.00 to 16.14) between the rate of complications following primary (n = 443, 8.39%) and revision (n = 22, 11.46%) surgeries. Multivariate analyses showed that patients with Medicare (odds ratio [OR]:1.74, 95% CI: 1.17 to 2.61), Medicaid (OR: 2.13, 95% CI: 1.59 to 2.86), or a malignant neoplasm (OR: 3.10, 95% CI: 1.62 to 5.93) were more likely to have complications. CONCLUSIONS: The rate of major complications following transsphenoidal pituitary surgery is lower than earlier retrospective reports. The overall complication rate following revision surgery was not significantly different from primary surgery. Insurance status and a diagnosis of a malignant neoplasm were associated with a higher rate of complications. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: 2C Laryngoscope, 125:311-317, 2015.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150124
[Lr] Last revision date:150124
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/lary.24892

  2 / 1429392 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25167991
[Au] Autor:Nicholson TM; Moses MA; Uchtmann KS; Keil KP; Bjorling DE; Vezina CM; Wood RW; Ricke WA
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; Medical Scientist Training Program, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin; Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, Rochester, New York....
[Ti] Title:Estrogen Receptor-α is a Key Mediator and Therapeutic Target for Bladder Complications of Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia.
[So] Source:J Urol;193(2):722-9, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1527-3792
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Estrogens are important in prostate growth and have a role in benign prostatic hyperplasia. However, to our knowledge no current therapy directly targets estrogen action. Estrogens act primarily via estrogen receptors α and ß. In a mouse model we evaluated the relative contribution of these receptors to bladder complications of benign prostatic hyperplasia. We also evaluated the prevention of these bladder complications using the selective estrogen receptor modulators raloxifene and tamoxifen (estrogen receptor-α selective antagonists), and R,R-THC (estrogen receptor-ß selective antagonist). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Adult male C57bl/6 mice received implants of 25 mg testosterone and 2.5 mg 17ß-estradiol slow release pellets. Untreated controls underwent sham surgery. We evaluated the contributions of the estrogen receptor subtypes in ERαKO and ERßKO mice compared to their respective wild-type litter mates. Wild-type mice treated with testosterone plus 17ß-estradiol were compared to mice treated with testosterone plus 17ß-estradiol and 25 mg selective estrogen receptor modulators to evaluate the prevention of benign prostatic hyperplasia complications by selective estrogen receptor modulators. RESULTS: Large bladders with urinary retention developed in ERαWT and ERßWT litter mates treated with testosterone plus 17ß-estradiol but such bladders did not develop in ERαKO mice treated with testosterone plus 17ß-estradiol. ERßKO mice treated with testosterone plus 17ß-estradiol had large bladders with urinary retention and increased bladder mass. Cotreatment with the estrogen receptor-α antagonist raloxifene resulted in decreased bladder mass compared to that in wild-type mice treated with testosterone plus 17ß-estradiol. Bladders in mice treated with the estrogen receptor-ß antagonist R,R-THC were similar to those in testosterone plus 17ß-estradiol treated mice. CONCLUSIONS: Estrogen receptor-α but not ß is a key mediator of bladder complications of benign prostatic hyperplasia and a potential target for future therapies.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150124
[Lr] Last revision date:150124
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 1429392 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25373706
[Au] Autor:Nguyen AH; Toste PA; Farrell JJ; Clerkin BM; Williams J; Muthusamy VR; Watson RR; Tomlinson JS; Hines OJ; Reber HA; Donahue TR
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, 10833 Le Conte Ave, CHS 72-215, Los Angeles, CA, 90095, USA.
[Ti] Title:Current recommendations for surveillance and surgery of intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms may overlook some patients with cancer.
[So] Source:J Gastrointest Surg;19(2):258-65, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4626
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The 2012 Sendai Criteria recommend that patients with 3 cm or larger branch duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (BD-IPMN) without any additional "worrisome features" or "high-risk stigmata" may undergo close observation. Furthermore, endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is not recommended for BD-IPMN <2 cm. These changes have generated concern among physicians treating patients with pancreatic diseases. The purposes of this study were to (i) apply the new Sendai guidelines to our institution's surgically resected BD-IPMN and (ii) reevaluate cyst size cutoffs in identifying patients with lesions harboring high-grade dysplasia or invasive cancer. METHODS: We retrospectively reviewed 150 patients at a university medical center with preoperatively diagnosed and pathologically confirmed IPMNs. Sixty-six patients had BD-IPMN. Pathologic grade was dichotomized into low-grade (low or intermediate grade dysplasia) or high-grade/invasive (high-grade dysplasia or invasive cancers). Fisher's exact test, chi-square test, student's t test, linear regression, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analyses were performed. RESULTS: The median BD-IPMN size on imaging was 2.4 cm (interquartile range 1.5-3.0). Fifty-one (77 %) low-grade and 15 (23 %) high-grade/invasive BD-IPMN were identified. ROC analysis demonstrated that cyst size on preoperative imaging is a reasonable predictor of grade with an area under the curve of 0.691. Two-thirds of high-grade/invasive BD-IPMN were <3 cm (n = 10). Compared to a cutoff of 3, 2 cm was associated with higher sensitivity (73.3 vs. 33.3 %) and negative predictive value (83.3 vs. 80 %, NPV) for high-grade/invasive BD-IPMN. Mural nodules on endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) or atypical cells on endoscopic ultrasound-fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) were identified in all cysts <2 and only 50 % of those <3 cm. Forty percent of cysts >3 cm were removed based on size alone. DISCUSSION/CONCLUSIONS: Our results suggest that "larger" size on noninvasive imaging can indicate high-grade/invasive cysts, and EUS-FNA may help identify "smaller" cysts with high-grade/invasive pathology.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150124
[Lr] Last revision date:150124
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11605-014-2693-z

  4 / 1429392 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25319035
[Au] Autor:Palanisamy AP; Taber DJ; Sutter AG; Nadig SN; Dowden JE; McGillicuddy JW; Baliga PK; Chavin KD
[Ad] Address:Division of Transplant Surgery, Department of Surgery, Medical University of South Carolina, 96 Jonathan Lucas Street, CSB 412, Charleston, SC, 29425, USA, arunp@musc.edu.
[Ti] Title:Clinical Outcomes and Costs Associated with In-hospital Biliary Complications After Liver Transplantation: a Cross-Sectional Analysis.
[So] Source:J Gastrointest Surg;19(2):282-9, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1873-4626
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: In-hospital biliary complications (BCs) after liver transplantation (LT) are reported in up to 20 % of patients and contribute to poor outcomes and increased costs. Existing single-center outcome and cost analyses studies are limited in scope. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional analysis of national data involving 7,967 patients transplanted between 2011 and 2012 with the primary aim of determining the association between BCs and clinical outcomes and costs. Age, race, diagnosis, and severity of illness are associated with the development of BCs. RESULTS: BCs develop in 14.6 % of LT recipients and have substantial implications for perioperative outcomes, including length of hospital and ICU stay (27.9 vs 19.6 mean days, p < 0.001 and 12.0 vs 8.3 mean days, p < 0.001, respectively), in-hospital morbidity (39 vs 27 %, p < 0.001), 30-day readmissions (14.8 vs 11.2 %, p < 0.001), and in-hospital mortality (5.8 vs 4.0 %, p < 0.001). BCs contributed to a mean increase in in-hospital costs of $36,212 (p < 0.001), due to increases in accommodations ($9,539, p < 0.001), surgical services ($3,988, p < 0.001), and pharmacy services ($8,445, p < 0.001). DISCUSSION: BCs are a predominant etiology for in-hospital morbidity and mortality, while contributing significantly to the high cost of LT. Efforts should be focused on understanding salient and modifiable risk factors, while developing innovative strategies to reduce BCs.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150124
[Lr] Last revision date:150124
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11605-014-2675-1

  5 / 1429392 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25559426
[Au] Autor:Oakley E; Wrazen B; Bellnier DA; Syed Y; Arshad H; Shafirstein G
[Ad] Address:Photodynamic Therapy Center, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York.
[Ti] Title:A new finite element approach for near real-time simulation of light propagation in locally advanced head and neck tumors.
[So] Source:Lasers Surg Med;47(1):60-7, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1096-9101
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Several clinical studies suggest that interstitial photodynamic therapy (I-PDT) may benefit patients with locally advanced head and neck cancer (LAHNC). For I-PDT, the therapeutic light is delivered through optical fibers inserted into the target tumor. The complex anatomy of the head and neck requires careful planning of fiber insertions. Often the fibers' location and tumor optical properties may vary from the original plan therefore pretreatment planning needs near real-time updating to account for any changes. The purpose of this work was to develop a finite element analysis (FEA) approach for near real-time simulation of light propagation in LAHNC. METHODS: Our previously developed FEA for modeling light propagation in skin tissue was modified to simulate light propagation from interstitial optical fibers. The modified model was validated by comparing the calculations with measurements in a phantom mimicking tumor optical properties. We investigated the impact of mesh element size and growth rate on the computation time, and defined optimal settings for the FEA. We demonstrated how the optimized FEA can be used for simulating light propagation in two cases of LAHNC amenable to I-PDT, as proof-of-concept. RESULTS: The modified FEA was in agreement with the measurements (P = 0.0271). The optimal maximum mesh size and growth rate were 0.005-0.02 m and 2-2.5 m/m, respectively. Using these settings the computation time for simulating light propagation in LAHNC was reduced from 25.9 to 3.7 minutes in one case, and 10.1 to 4 minutes in another case. There were minor differences (1.62%, 1.13%) between the radiant exposures calculated with either mesh in both cases. CONCLUSIONS: Our FEA approach can be used to model light propagation from diffused optical fibers in complex heterogeneous geometries representing LAHNC. There is a range of maximum element size (MES) and maximum element growth rate (MEGR) that can be used to minimize the computation time of the FEA to 4 minutes. Lasers Surg. Med. 47:60-67, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150124
[Lr] Last revision date:150124
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/lsm.22313

  6 / 1429392 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25487746
[Au] Autor:Leung SJ; Rice PS; Barton JK
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ.
[Ti] Title:In vivo molecular mapping of the tumor microenvironment in an azoxymethane-treated mouse model of colon carcinogenesis.
[So] Source:Lasers Surg Med;47(1):40-9, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1096-9101
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Development of miniaturized imaging systems with molecular probes enables examination of molecular changes leading to initiation and progression of colorectal cancer in an azoxymethane (AOM)-induced mouse model of the disease. Through improved and novel studies of animal disease models, more effective diagnostic and treatment strategies may be developed for clinical translation. We introduce use of a miniaturized multimodal endoscope with lavage-delivered fluorescent probes to examine dynamic microenvironment changes in an AOM-treated mouse model. STUDY DESIGN/MATERIALS AND METHODS: The endoscope is equipped with optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) imaging modalities. It is used with Cy5.5-conjugated antibodies to create time-resolved molecular maps of colon carcinogenesis. We monitored in vivo changes in molecular expression over a five month period for four biomarkers: epithelial growth factor receptor (EGFR), transferrin receptor (TfR), transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGFß1), and chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 2 (CXCR2). In vivo OCT and LIF images were compared over multiple time points to correlate increases in biomarker expression with adenoma development. RESULTS: This system is uniquely capable of tracking in vivo changes in molecular expression over time. Increased expression of the biomarker panel corresponded to sites of disease and offered predictive utility in highlighting sites of disease prior to detectable structural changes. Biomarker expression also tended to increase with higher tumor burden and growth rate in the colon. CONCLUSION: We can use miniaturized dual modality endoscopes with fluorescent probes to study the tumor microenvironment in developmental animal models of cancer and supplement findings from biopsy and tissue harvesting. Lasers Surg. Med. 47:40-49, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150124
[Lr] Last revision date:150124
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/lsm.22309

  7 / 1429392 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25449147
[Au] Autor:Keenan MR; Leung SJ; Rice PS; Wall RA; Barton JK
[Ad] Address:The University of Arizona, Department of Biomedical Engineering, 1657 E. Helen Street, 210240, Tucson, Arizona, 85721.
[Ti] Title:Dual optical modality endoscopic imaging of cancer development in the mouse colon.
[So] Source:Lasers Surg Med;47(1):30-9, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1096-9101
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: We utilize a miniature, dual-modality endoscope that combines fluorescence-based surface magnifying chromoendoscopy (SMC) and optical coherence tomography (OCT) to follow the anatomical changes that occur during adenoma development in the mouse colon. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Twenty-five mice were treated with the carcinogen azoxymethane (AOM) to induce tumor development in the distal colon, or were treated with saline as control, and were imaged over six months. OCT detects adenoma number with high sensitivity and specificity and can measure lesion size. In methylene blue-lavaged colons, SMC detects changes in the colonic crypts. SMC images of control mouse colons exhibit reticulated patterns of crypts of equal size, forming either a dot or honeycomb pattern. RESULTS: Images of AOM-treated colons show mild crypt irregularities even in grossly normal tissue. Images of small to medium adenoma exhibit larger crypts, more intense signal, and irregular spacing whereas those of large adenoma have heterogeneous, intense signal and loss of crypt structure. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of OCT and SMC permits the detection of neoplastic events from the earliest stages of crypt irregularities before gross tissue changes are noted, through to measuring the growth of protruding adenoma. Lasers Surg. Med. 47:30-39, 2015. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150124
[Lr] Last revision date:150124
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/lsm.22307

  8 / 1429392 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25176165
[Au] Autor:Naing KW; Monjazeb AM; Li CS; Lee LY; Yang A; Borys D; Canter RJ
[Ad] Address:Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Davis Medical Center, University of California, Sacramento, California.
[Ti] Title:Perioperative radiotherapy is associated with improved survival among patients with synovial sarcoma: A SEER analysis.
[So] Source:J Surg Oncol;111(2):158-64, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1096-9098
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND METHODS: We examined the outcomes of synovial sarcoma (SS) patients in a national database. We identified 1,189 patients from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database with data on site and extent of surgery. We excluded patients diagnosed before 1990, <18 years, or lacking pathologic confirmation. Using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards analyses, we determined predictors of overall (OS) and disease-specific survival (DSS). RESULTS: The mean age was 41, 49.3% were female, and 82.2% were white. Radiotherapy (RT) was administered to 57.5%. On multivariable analysis, age at diagnosis, sex, race, anatomic site, SEER summary stage, tumor size, surgery type, and RT predicted OS. Similar predictors of DSS were identified. The hazard ratio (HR) for OS was 0.65 (95% CI 0.48-0.88) in favor of RT and 0.62 (95% CI 0.45-0.86) for DSS. Five-year OS improved 8.4 ± 1.0% with RT (P = 0.003), and five-year DSS improved 7.7 ± 1.0% with RT (P = 0.015). CONCLUSIONS: In the largest study to date examining the role of RT in synovial sarcoma, we observed that RT was associated with a statistically significant improvement in oncologic outcome among SS patients. These data support the use of RT in the multi-modality treatment of patients with SS. J. Surg. Oncol. 2015 111:158-164. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150124
[Lr] Last revision date:150124
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/jso.23780

  9 / 1429392 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25311333
[Au] Autor:Bober SL; Recklitis CJ; Bakan J; Garber JE; Patenaude AF
[Ad] Address:Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, MA, USA; Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Addressing sexual dysfunction after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy: effects of a brief, psychosexual intervention.
[So] Source:J Sex Med;12(1):189-97, 2015 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1743-6109
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Women at high risk for ovarian cancer due to BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation or family history are recommended to undergo risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy (RRSO) after age 35 or completion of childbearing. This potentially life-saving surgery leads to premature menopause, frequently resulting in distressing and unaddressed sexual dysfunction. AIM: To pilot a novel sexual health intervention for women with BRCA1/2 mutations who previously underwent RRSO a using a single-arm trial. Feasibility and primary outcomes including sexual dysfunction and psychological distress were assessed. METHODS: This single-arm trial included a one-time, half-day educational session comprised of targeted sexual health education, body awareness and relaxation training, and mindfulness-based cognitive therapy strategies, followed by two sessions of tailored telephone counseling. Assessments were completed at baseline and 2 months postintervention. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Study end points include feasibility and effectiveness as reported by the participant. RESULTS: Thirty-seven women completed baseline and postintervention assessments. At baseline, participants had a mean age of 44.4 (standard deviation [SD] = 3.9) years and mean duration of 3.8 (SD = 2.7) years since RRSO. Overall sexual functioning (P = 0.018), as well as desire (P = 0.003), arousal (P = 0.003), satisfaction (P = 0.028), and pain (P = 0.018), improved significantly. There were significant reductions in somatization (P = 0.029) and anxiety scores (P < 0.001), and, overall, for the Global Severity Index (P < 0.001) of the Brief Symptom Inventory. Sexual self-efficacy and sexual knowledge also improved significantly from baseline to postintervention (both P < 0.001). Women were highly satisfied with the intervention content and reported utilizing new skills to manage sexual dysfunction. CONCLUSIONS: This intervention integrates elements of cognitive behavioral therapy with sexual health education to address a much-neglected problem after RRSO. Results from this promising single-arm study provide preliminary data to move toward conducting a randomized, controlled trial. Bober SL, Recklitis CJ, Bakan J, Garber JE, and Patenaude AF. Addressing sexual dysfunction after risk-reducing salpingo-oophorectomy: Effects of a brief, psychosexual intervention. J Sex Med 2015;12:189-197.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150124
[Lr] Last revision date:150124
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1111/jsm.12713

  10 / 1429392 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25348612
[Au] Autor:Feng Y; Sassi S; Shen JK; Yang X; Gao Y; Osaka E; Zhang J; Yang S; Yang C; Mankin HJ; Hornicek FJ; Duan Z
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Sarcoma Biology Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 55 Fruit Street, Jackson 1115, 02114, Boston, Massachusetts; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jie Fang Avenue, 430022, Wuhan, China.
[Ti] Title:Targeting Cdk11 in osteosarcoma cells using the CRISPR-cas9 system.
[So] Source:J Orthop Res;33(2):199-207, 2015 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1554-527X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Osteosarcoma is the most common type primary malignant tumor of bone. Patients with regional osteosarcoma are routinely treated with surgery and chemotherapy. In addition, many patients with metastatic or recurrent osteosarcoma show poor prognosis with current chemotherapy agents. Therefore, it is important to improve the general condition and the overall survival rate of patients with osteosarcoma by identifying novel therapeutic strategies. Recent studies have revealed that CDK11 is essential in osteosarcoma cell growth and survival by inhibiting CDK11 mRNA expression with RNAi. Here, we apply the Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system, a robust and highly efficient novel genome editing tool, to determine the effect of targeting endogenous CDK11 gene at the DNA level in osteosarcoma cell lines. We show that CDK11 can be efficiently silenced by CRISPR-Cas9. Inhibition of CDK11 is associated with decreased cell proliferation and viability, and induces cell death in osteosarcoma cell lines KHOS and U-2OS. Furthermore, the migration and invasion activities are also markedly reduced by CDK11 knockout. These results demonstrate that CRISPR-Cas9 system is a useful tool for the modification of endogenous CDK11 gene expression, and CRISPR-Cas9 targeted CDK11 knockout may be a promising therapeutic regimen for the treatment of osteosarcoma. © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 33:199-207, 2015.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 150124
[Lr] Last revision date:150124
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1002/jor.22745


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