Database : MEDLINE
Search on : surgery [Words]
References found : 1402817 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Detailed]

page 1 of 140282 go to page                         

  1 / 1402817 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 23952739
[Au] Autor:Kwon SY; Park SD; Park K
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Wonkwang University School of Medicine, Iksan, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Comparative effect of topical silicone gel and topical tretinoin cream for the prevention of hypertrophic scar and keloid formation and the improvement of scars.
[So] Source:J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol;28(8):1025-33, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1468-3083
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Numerous modalities have been used to treat keloids and hypertrophic scars; however, optimal treatment has not yet been established. Therefore, prevention is the mainstay. Recently, silicone gel and tretinoin cream have been shown to be useful for the prevention of hypertrophic scars and keloids. However, there has been no comparative study of the two topical agents thus far. OBJECTIVE: To determine and compare the effectiveness of silicone gel and tretinoin cream for the prevention of hypertrophic scars and keloids resulting from postoperative wounds and for scar improvement. METHOD: This study included 26 patients with 44 different wounds. The postoperative wounds were divided into two treatment groups and one control group. The patients in the first and second treatment group applied silicone gel and tretinoin cream, respectively, twice a day on their wounds after their stitches were removed. In contrast, the control group patients did not apply anything. We used the Modified Vancouver Scar Scale to quantitatively examine the effectiveness of silicone gel and tretinoin cream just after stitches removal, and at 4, 8, 12 and 24 weeks after removal of the stitches. RESULTS: The silicone gel and tretinoin cream effectively prevented hypertrophic scars and keloids and improved scar effects in the two treatment groups compared with those in the control group. However, no significant difference was noted between the two treatment groups. CONCLUSION: To prevent hypertrophic scars and keloids and improve scars after surgery, application of a silicone gel or a tretinoin cream to the wounds is needed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/jdv.12242

  2 / 1402817 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 23931335
[Au] Autor:Serra-Guillén C; Llombart B; Nagore E; Requena C; Traves V; Llorca D; Kindem S; Alcalá R; Guillén C; Sanmartín O
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Instituto Valenciano de Oncología, Valencia.
[Ti] Title:Positive margins in excised dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans: a study of 58 cases treated with slow-Mohs surgery.
[So] Source:J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol;28(8):1012-5, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1468-3083
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Dermatofibrosarcoma protuberans (DFSP) is characterized by unpredictable subclinical extension, meaning that positive margins are frequently detected following conventional surgical excision. OBJECTIVE: To study the presence or absence of residual tumour in DFSP with positive margins after conventional surgery and identify possible predictors of residual tumour or clear margins following a single Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) stage. METHODS: A retrospective study of patients with DFSP and positive margins following conventional excision referred for MMS was performed. We studied gender, age, tumour site, time from presentation to diagnosis, and affected margins. RESULTS: We studied 58 cases, 35 (60.3%) of which had histological evidence of residual tumour. Tumours of the head and neck were significantly associated with the persistence of tumour. A single MMS stage was sufficient to achieve clearance in the majority of cases (n = 46). All tumours with lateral involvement only were resolved with a single Mohs stage. CONCLUSIONS: DFSPs with positive margins after conventional surgical excision should undergo re-excision because the majority have histologic evidence of residual tumour. Re-excision with 1-cm margins beyond the scar could be an option in certain tumour sites, particularly when it is known which margins are involved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1111/jdv.12235

  3 / 1402817 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25101586
[Au] Autor:Erhart P; Grond-Ginsbach C; Hakimi M; Lasitschka F; Dihlmann S; Böckler D; Hyhlik-Dürr A
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Ruprecht-Karls University Heidelberg, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Finite element analysis of abdominal aortic aneurysms: predicted rupture risk correlates with aortic wall histology in individual patients.
[So] Source:J Endovasc Ther;21(4):556-64, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1545-1550
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To evaluate a finite element analysis (FEA) model as a predictive tool for abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) rupture risk assessment. METHODS: FEA of asymptomatic infrarenal AAAs in 15 men (mean age 72 years) was performed preoperatively using semiautomatic finite element analysis software (A4clinics) to calculate peak wall stress (PWS) and regions of highest and lowest rupture risk index (RRI). The areas of high and low RRI identified on the preoperative FEA were sampled during open surgery; aortic wall specimens were prepared for histological analysis. A semiquantitative score compared the histological findings from high and low rupture risk samples. RESULTS: Significant correlation was found between histological AAA wall integrity and RRI in individual patients. AAA wall regions with highest RRI showed advanced histological disintegrity compared to regions with lower RRI within the same AAA: mean smooth muscle cells: 0.43 vs. 1.21, respectively (p=0.031); elastic fibers: 0.57 vs. 1.29, respectively (p=0.008); cholesterol plaque: 2.60 vs. 2.20, respectively (p=0.034); and calcified plaque: 2.27 vs. 1.40, respectively (p=0.017). The amount of calcified plaque was significantly correlated with PWS (r=0.528, p=0.043) by univariate regression analysis. However, there was no correlation between PWS or RRI and the histological findings between patients. CONCLUSION: These preliminary results show that high rupture risk regions estimated by FEA contain increased histopathological degeneration compared to low rupture risk samples within the same AAA. Until now, the role of FEA in predicting individual AAA rupture risk has not been established as a validated diagnostic tool. However, these data provide promising results for FEA model verification.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1583/14-4695.1

  4 / 1402817 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25101583
[Au] Autor:Dijkstra ML; Lardenoye JW; van Oostayen JA; Zeebregts CJ; Reijnen MM
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Surgery, Rijnstate Hospital, Arnhem, The Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Endovascular aneurysm sealing for juxtarenal aneurysm using the Nellix device and chimney covered stents.
[So] Source:J Endovasc Ther;21(4):541-7, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1545-1550
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To show the feasibility of the Nellix device in conjunction with a chimney technique for treating juxtarenal aneurysms in two patients who were deemed unsuitable for fenestrated endovascular aneurysm repair or open surgery. CASE REPORTS: Two men aged 83 and 81 years were referred with a juxtarenal abdominal aortic aneurysm (66 and 69 mm, respectively). Both were considered for open surgery as well as custom-made fenestrated stent-graft but deemed unsuitable for both options. They were both treated using the Nellix endoprosthesis in combination with chimney grafts to preserve the renal arteries. Technical success was achieved in both cases, with successful aneurysm exclusion and target vessel preservation (the right renal artery in the first case and both renal arteries in the second). At 6 months, duplex ultrasound and computed tomographic angiography of the first patient showed no signs of endoleak and patent renal arteries. The second patient developed a right retroperitoneal hematoma with minor extravasation near the lower pole of the right kidney for which coil embolization was necessary. The subsequent clinical sequelae led to respiratory insufficiency and ultimately death. CONCLUSION: The use of the Nellix endoprosthesis combined with chimney grafts is technically feasible. The addition of chimney grafts can increase the applicability of endovascular aneurysm sealing to treat short-neck and juxtarenal aneurysms. Further studies are needed to confirm these findings and establish longer term outcome.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1583/14-4728MR.1

  5 / 1402817 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25101582
[Au] Autor:Malkawi AH; de Bruin JL; Loftus IM; Thompson MM
[Ad] Address:St George's Vascular Institute, St George's Healthcare NHS Trust, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Treatment of a juxtarenal aneurysm with the Nellix endovascular aneurysm sealing system and chimney stent.
[So] Source:J Endovasc Ther;21(4):538-40, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1545-1550
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To present treatment of a juxtarenal aneurysm using the Nellix endovascular aneurysm sealing system (EVAS) and a chimney stent. CASE REPORT: A 79-year-old woman was diagnosed with a 6-cm juxtarenal aneurysm. Standard endovascular aneurysm repair was not possible due to lack of an adequate infrarenal landing zone, and poor iliac access and angulated visceral aortic branches precluded a custom-made fenestrated solution. The patient was not a suitable candidate for open surgery due to significant comorbidity, so she underwent successful endovascular aneurysm repair with the Nellix EVAS system and a renal chimney stent. Follow-up imaging at 6 months showed a sealed aneurysm sac and patent renal chimney stent. CONCLUSION: The Nellix EVAS system obliterates the aneurysm sac using polymer-filled endobags. The ability of the endobags to conform to adjacent structures may offer advantages over conventional endografts when combined with parallel grafts designed to treat juxtarenal aneurysms.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1583/14-4698R.1

  6 / 1402817 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24752943
[Au] Autor:Liu YP; Tiu CM; Chou YH; Hsu CY; King KL; Lai YC; Wang HK; Chiou HJ; Chang CY
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan; National Yang Ming University, School of Medicine, Taipei, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Thyroid metastasis from breast cancer presenting with diffuse microcalcifications on sonography: a case report.
[So] Source:J Clin Ultrasound;42(7):430-2, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0096
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Microcalcifications are frequently associated with papillary thyroid cancers. Metastatic nodules from extrathyroid malignancies may mimic primary thyroid neoplasm on sonography, but do not present with microcalcifications. We report the case of a 45-year-old woman with a history of invasive ductal carcinomas of bilateral breasts, status post surgery and neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Four years after surgery, thyroid sonography revealed diffuse microcalcifications without nodular component. Core needle biopsy confirmed thyroid metastasis from primary breast cancer.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/jcu.22137

  7 / 1402817 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24659502
[Au] Autor:Song SE; Seo BK; Son GS; Kim YS
[Ad] Address:Department of Radiology, Korea University Ansan Hospital, Korea University College of Medicine, Ansan-city, Kyunggi-do, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Sonographic diagnosis of abscess following breast-conserving surgery with insertion of nonabsorbable mesh.
[So] Source:J Clin Ultrasound;42(7):439-43, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0096
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Immediate mesh insertion has been recently used for breast reconstruction after breast-conserving surgery. We report a case of abscess formation following immediate nonabsorbable mesh insertion with breast-conserving surgery. In this article, we demonstrate multimodal breast imaging features and pathologic correlations of the case. In addition, we illustrate characteristic sonographic findings of nonabsorbable mesh fibers to differentiate them from a gossypiboma caused by a retained surgical sponge or tumor recurrence.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1002/jcu.22148

  8 / 1402817 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 25083961
[Au] Autor:Colón E; Carlson JW
[Ad] Address:Department of Pathology and Cytology, Karolinska University Hospital (E.C, J.W.C) Institution for Oncology-Pathology, Karolinska Institutet (E.C, J.W.C), Stockholm, Sweden.
[Ti] Title:Evaluation of the fallopian tubes after neoadjuvant chemotherapy: persistence of serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma.
[So] Source:Int J Gynecol Pathol;33(5):463-9, 2014 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1538-7151
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The origin of pelvic serous carcinoma continues to be controversial. Recent studies of patients undergoing primary surgery for ovarian, primary peritoneal, and uterine serous carcinomas have indicated the value of complete fimbrial sampling for detecting occult serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC). Evidence suggests that a significant proportion of pelvic serous carcinomas may arise from in situ lesions on the distal fallopian tube. In this study, 14 consecutive cases of interval debulking surgery after neoadjuvant chemotherapy were reviewed, using both hematoxylin and eosin staining and, as needed, immunohistochemistry for p53 and MIB-1. The degree of fimbrial sampling was evaluated, and cases were examined for tumor involvement in the endosalpinx and the presence of STIC. Tumor treatment response was classified using a semiquantitative 4-tier scale. The results indicate that STIC can persist despite chemotherapy and can be readily identified during microscopic examination. These results are expected to improve the quality of the pathology evaluation by providing data-driven recommendations for sampling in interval surgery cases and showing the value of a systematic approach to evaluating the fallopian tube (sectioning and extensively examining the fimbria protocol). These results demonstrate that a tubal primary can still be assigned in these situations. Finally, this study raises interesting biologic questions about the sensitivity of cells originating from serous cancer tumor to chemotherapy. The presence or absence of STIC in specimens from interval surgery after neoadjuvant treatment has not previously, to our knowledge, been addressed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/PGP.0b013e3182a142c2

  9 / 1402817 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24681412
[Au] Autor:Mo KW; Vlantis A; Wong EW; Chiu TW
[Ad] Address:Division of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Prince of Wales Hospital, Shatin, Hong Kong....
[Ti] Title:Double free flaps for reconstruction of complex/composite defects in head and neck surgery.
[So] Source:Hong Kong Med J;20(4):279-84, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1024-2708
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE. To demonstrate the feasibility of double free flap surgery in head and neck reconstruction. DESIGN. Descriptive case series. SETTING. A university-affiliated hospital in Hong Kong. PATIENTS. Twelve patients with head and neck cancer (encountered over a 2.5-year period) who had reconstructive surgery with planned simultaneous double free flaps. RESULTS. The mean total operating time was 660 minutes and there were no flap failures. Postoperative stays ranged from 11 to 82 days; nine patients were discharged within 3 weeks and seven were able to maintain their weight with oral feeding. The survival rate up to 1 year was 64%. CONCLUSION. The use of double free flaps is an option worth considering for complex head and neck defects in carefully selected patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.12809/hkmj134113

  10 / 1402817 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text

[PMID]: 24810704
[Au] Autor:Lazarus CL; Husaini H; Jacobson AS; Mojica JK; Buchbinder D; Okay D; Urken ML
[Ad] Address:Thyroid Head and Neck Cancer Foundation, New York, NY, USA, clazarus@chpnet.org.
[Ti] Title:Development of a new lingual range-of-motion assessment scale: normative data in surgically treated oral cancer patients.
[So] Source:Dysphagia;29(4):489-99, 2014 Aug.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0460
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Surgical resection in oral cancer patients can result in altered speech, swallowing, and patient perception of quality of life (QOL). Oral surgery can result in reduced lingual range of motion (ROM). However, few studies have quantified the degree of lingual restriction after surgery. This pilot study describes a new measurement system to define tongue ROM in surgically treated tongue cancer patients. This measurement system was validated by comparing results in these treated surgical patients versus healthy individuals. This scale was further validated by correlating ROM with performance status, oral outcomes, and patient-rated QOL. Thirty-six patients who underwent oral tongue surgery and 31 healthy individuals were included. Tongue ROM was assessed using a novel ROM assessment system. This novel system was examined in these patients versus healthy subjects. This measurement tool was further validated by correlating tongue ROM in treated patients with performance status, oral outcomes, and patient-rated QOL. Tongue ROM was found to be significantly lower in the surgically treated patients than in the healthy individuals (p = 0.0001). Tongue ROM correlated with performance status, oral outcomes, and all QOL measures. This new tongue ROM measurement system defined tongue deficits in surgically treated oral cancer patients. This tool was validated by comparing results to those in healthy individuals, as well as by correlating tongue ROM to performance status, oral outcomes, and QOL. This measurement tool can be used to define baseline and postsurgery tongue ROM in oral cancer patients, as well as track change over time with recovery and therapy. Future studies should examine use of this measurement tool with other populations demonstrating tongue deficits.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1408
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00455-014-9534-9


page 1 of 140282 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information