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[PMID]: 29460640
[Au] Autor:Sullivan A; Watkinson J; Waddington J; Park BK; Naisbitt DJ
[Ad] Address:a MRC Centre for Drug Safety Science, Department of Molecular and Clinical Pharmacology , The University of Liverpool , Liverpool , England.
[Ti] Title:Implications of HLA-allele associations for the study of type IV drug hypersensitivity reactions.
[So] Source:Expert Opin Drug Metab Toxicol;14(3):261-274, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1744-7607
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Type IV drug hypersensitivity remains an important clinical problem and an obstacle to the development of new drugs. Several forms of drug hypersensitivity are associated with expression of specific HLA alleles. Furthermore, drug-specific T-lymphocytes have been isolated from patients with reactions. Despite this, controversy remains as to how drugs interact with immune receptors to stimulate a T-cell response. Areas covered: This article reviews the pathways of T-cell activation by drugs and how the ever increasing number of associations between expression of HLA alleles and susceptibility to hypersensitivity is impacting on our research effort to understanding this form of iatrogenic disease. Expert opinion: For a drug to activate a T-cell, a complex is formed between HLA molecules, an HLA binding peptide, the drug and the T-cell receptor. T-cell responses can involve drugs and stable or reactive metabolites bound covalently or non-covalently to any component of this complex. Recent research has linked the HLA associations to the disease through the characterization of drug-specific T-cell responses restricted to specific alleles. However, there is now a need to identify the additional genetic or environment factors that determine susceptibility and use our increased knowledge to develop predictive immunogenicity tests that offer benefit to Pharma developing new drugs.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Drug Hypersensitivity/immunology
HLA Antigens/immunology
Hypersensitivity, Delayed/chemically induced
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alleles
Drug Hypersensitivity/genetics
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Humans
Hypersensitivity, Delayed/genetics
Hypersensitivity, Delayed/immunology
Lymphocyte Activation/drug effects
Lymphocyte Activation/immunology
T-Lymphocytes/immunology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (HLA Antigens)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180221
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1080/17425255.2018.1441285

  2 / 261738 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29446280
[Au] Autor:Stepanenko LA; Savchenkov MF; Ilina SV; Anganova EV; Savilov ED
[Ti] Title:[An assessment of the immune status of the children population as a marker of technogenic pollution of the environment].
[So] Source:Gig Sanit;95(12):1129-33, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0016-9900
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:This article describes results of the immunological study of school-aged children residing in cities with different levels of the technogenic air pollution. Children from cities with the highest level of the technogenic pollution had a high number of immature neutrophils (band cells) and eosinophils. The children living in these ecologically unfavorable areas have presented a reduction of T-cell antigen receptor CD3, CD4, CD8, CD20, CD16, CD95. This indicates to that both T-cell and B-cell immunity is suppressed. The decline of the phagocytic function in neutrophils indicates to the suppression of the nonspecific host defense mechanisms also.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Air Pollutants
B-Lymphocytes/immunology
Environmental Exposure
T-Lymphocytes/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Air Pollutants/adverse effects
Air Pollutants/analysis
Child
Environmental Exposure/adverse effects
Environmental Exposure/analysis
Environmental Exposure/prevention & control
Female
Humans
Immunocompetence/drug effects
Male
Monitoring, Immunologic/methods
Monitoring, Immunologic/statistics & numerical data
Population
Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell/analysis
School Health Services/organization & administration
School Health Services/statistics & numerical data
Siberia/epidemiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Air Pollutants); 0 (Receptors, Antigen, T-Cell)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180216
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 261738 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29412476
[Au] Autor:Bakela K; Dimakopoulou M; Batsou P; Manidakis N; Athanassakis I
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Immunology, Department of Biology, University of Crete, Heraklion, Crete, Greece.
[Ti] Title:Soluble MHC class II-driven therapy for a systemic lupus erythematosus murine experimental invitro and invivo model.
[So] Source:Scand J Immunol;87(3), 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3083
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Taking into consideration the multiparametric nature of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), the severity and variability of symptoms and the lack of effective therapeutic approaches, this study took advantage of the recently described role of soluble major histocompatibility complex class II (sMHCII) molecules in maintaining tolerance to the organism and attempted to apply sMHCII proteins as a treatment to murine SLE experimental models invitro as well as invivo. After breaking tolerance to DNA invitro, which was accompanied by development of specific anti-dsDNA antibodies, syngeneic or allogeneic sMHCII molecules, purified from healthy mouse serum, could significantly reduce the specific antibody levels and drive the system towards immunosuppression, as assessed by specific marker analysis on T cells and cytokine production by flow cytometry and ELISA, respectively. The invivo experimental model consisted of pristane-induced SLE symptoms to BALB/c mice, which developed maximal levels of anti-dsDNA 2months after pristane inoculation. Syngeneic or allogeneic sMHCII administration could alleviate pristane-induced symptoms, significantly decrease specific anti-dsDNA antibody production and develop immunosuppression to the host, as manifested by increase of CD4+CTLA-4+ and CD4+CD25+ cell populations in the spleen. Thus, the results presented in this study introduced the ability of sMHCII proteins to suppress specific autoantigen response, opening new areas of research and offering novel therapeutic approaches to SLE with expanding features to other autoimmune diseases.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antibodies, Antinuclear/immunology
Autoantigens/immunology
Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/immunology
Immune Tolerance/immunology
Immunotherapy/methods
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/immunology
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/therapy
T-Lymphocytes/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
CD4 Antigens/metabolism
CTLA-4 Antigen/metabolism
Cells, Cultured
DNA/immunology
Disease Models, Animal
Immunosuppression
Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit/metabolism
Lupus Erythematosus, Systemic/chemically induced
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Spleen/cytology
Spleen/immunology
Terpenes/adverse effects
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Antinuclear); 0 (Autoantigens); 0 (CD4 Antigens); 0 (CTLA-4 Antigen); 0 (Histocompatibility Antigens Class II); 0 (Il2ra protein, mouse); 0 (Interleukin-2 Receptor alpha Subunit); 0 (Terpenes); 26HZV48DT1 (pristane); 9007-49-2 (DNA)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180208
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/sji.12644

  4 / 261738 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29381830
[Au] Autor:Sioud M
[Ad] Address:Department of Cancer Immunology, Oslo University Hospital, The Norwegian Radium Hospital, Montebello, Oslo, Norway.
[Ti] Title:T-cell cross-reactivity may explain the large variation in how cancer patients respond to checkpoint inhibitors.
[So] Source:Scand J Immunol;87(3), 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3083
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The therapeutic use of the immune system to specifically attack tumours has been a long-standing vision among tumour immunologists. Recently, the use of checkpoint inhibitors to turn-off immunosuppressive signals has proven to be effective in enhancing T-cell reactivity against patient-specific neoantigens, resulting from somatic mutations. Several of the identified T-cell epitopes share similarity with common bacterial and viral antigens, suggesting the involvement of pre-existing microbial cross-reactive T cells in rapid and durable tumour regression seen in some patients. This notion of T-cell cross-reactivity is further supported by the findings that intestinal bacteria can influence checkpoint-blockade therapy. Moreover, early data indicate the presence of such T cells in long-term survival breast cancer patients. This review highlights the main challenges for cancer immunotherapy and discusses the potential contribution of T-cell cross-reactivity in cancer immunotherapy and whether it can be used as a biomarker to predict the responsiveness to checkpoint inhibitors.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cross Reactions/immunology
Immunotherapy/methods
Neoplasms/immunology
Neoplasms/therapy
T-Lymphocytes/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antigens, Bacterial/immunology
Antigens, Neoplasm/immunology
Antigens, Viral/immunology
Biomarkers, Tumor/immunology
CTLA-4 Antigen/antagonists & inhibitors
Dendritic Cells/immunology
Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte/immunology
Humans
Lymphocyte Activation/immunology
Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor/antagonists & inhibitors
Receptors, Immunologic/antagonists & inhibitors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antigens, Bacterial); 0 (Antigens, Neoplasm); 0 (Antigens, Viral); 0 (Biomarkers, Tumor); 0 (CTLA-4 Antigen); 0 (Epitopes, T-Lymphocyte); 0 (PDCD1 protein, human); 0 (Programmed Cell Death 1 Receptor); 0 (Receptors, Immunologic); 0 (TIGIT protein, human)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180131
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1111/sji.12643

  5 / 261738 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29377916
[Au] Autor:Tutykhina I; Esmagambetov I; Bagaev A; Pichugin A; Lysenko A; Shcherbinin D; Sedova E; Logunov D; Shmarov M; Ataullakhanov R; Naroditsky B; Gintsburg A
[Ad] Address:Federal Research Centre of Epidemiology and Microbiology named after Honorary Academician N. F. Gamaleya, Ministry of Health, Moscow, Russia.
[Ti] Title:Vaccination potential of B and T epitope-enriched NP and M2 against Influenza A viruses from different clades and hosts.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191574, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:To avoid outbreaks of influenza virus epidemics and pandemics among human populations, modern medicine requires the development of new universal vaccines that are able to provide protection from a wide range of influenza A virus strains. In the course of development of a universal vaccine, it is necessary to consider that immunity must be generated even against viruses from different hosts because new human epidemic virus strains have their origins in viruses of birds and other animals. We have enriched conserved viral proteins-nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix protein 2 (M2)-by B and T-cell epitopes not only human origin but also swine and avian origin. For this purpose, we analyzed M2 and NP sequences with respect to changes in the sequences of known T and B-cell epitopes and chose conserved and evolutionarily significant epitopes. Eventually, we found consensus sequences of M2 and NP that have the maximum quantity of epitopes that are 100% coincident with them. Consensus epitope-enriched amino acid sequences of M2 and NP proteins were included in a recombinant adenoviral vector. Immunization with Ad5-tet-M2NP induced strong CD8 and CD4 T cells responses, specific to each of the encoded antigens, i.e. M2 and NP. Eight months after immunization with Ad5-tet-M2NP, high numbers of M2- and NP-responding "effector memory" CD44posCD62neg T cells were found in the mouse spleens, which revealed a long-term T cell immune memory conferred by the immunization. In all, the challenge experiments showed an extraordinarily wide-ranging efficacy of protection by the Ad5-tet-M2NP vaccine, covering 5 different heterosubtypes of influenza A virus (2 human, 2 avian and 1 swine).
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: B-Lymphocytes/immunology
Epitopes/immunology
Influenza A virus/immunology
Nucleoproteins/immunology
T-Lymphocytes/immunology
Vaccination
Viral Matrix Proteins/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Antibodies, Viral/biosynthesis
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Viral); 0 (Epitopes); 0 (Nucleoproteins); 0 (Viral Matrix Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191574

  6 / 261738 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29362889
[Au] Autor:Gaudio F; Tamma R; Ingravallo G; Perrone T; Laddaga FE; De Candia M; Maiorano E; Ribatti D; Specchia G
[Ad] Address:Department of Emergency and Organ Transplantation (D.E.T.O.), Hematology Section, University of Bari, Bari, Italy. fragaudio@alice.it.
[Ti] Title:Computer-driven quantitative image analysis in the assessment of tumor cell and T cell features in diffuse large B cell lymphomas.
[So] Source:Ann Hematol;97(4):663-668, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0584
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL) is recognized as the most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma subtype. Advanced high-resolution digital scans of pathology slides have enabled the development of computer-based image analysis algorithms that may assist pathologists in quantifying immunohistochemical stains. In this retrospective study, we reviewed data from 29 patients affected by DLBCL. In order to evaluate the number of tumor cells and microenvironment T cells, we performed an analysis of CD20, Ki67, and CD3 counts, assessed with the Positive Pixel Count algorithm embedded in the Aperio ImageScope software. A lower tumor cell count was observed in patients with a non-germinal center immunophenotype, high LDH, splenomegaly and an IPI ≥ 3. A lower number of CD3 was observed in patients with bulky disease, an IPI ≥ 3 and disease stage 3-4. Overall, these data confirm that quantitative analysis of the tumor cells and of the tumor microenvironment by means of computer-driven quantitative image analysis may add new information in DLBCL diagnosis.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: B-Lymphocytes/pathology
Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted
Lymph Nodes/diagnostic imaging
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/diagnostic imaging
T-Lymphocytes/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Algorithms
Antigens, CD20/metabolism
B-Lymphocytes/immunology
B-Lymphocytes/metabolism
CD3 Complex/metabolism
Female
Germinal Center/immunology
Germinal Center/metabolism
Germinal Center/pathology
Humans
Immunohistochemistry
Ki-67 Antigen/metabolism
Lymph Nodes/immunology
Lymph Nodes/metabolism
Lymph Nodes/pathology
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/immunology
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/metabolism
Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse/pathology
Male
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Prognosis
Retrospective Studies
T-Lymphocytes/immunology
T-Lymphocytes/metabolism
Tumor Microenvironment
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antigens, CD20); 0 (CD3 Complex); 0 (Ki-67 Antigen)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180125
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00277-017-3212-6

  7 / 261738 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29339155
[Au] Autor:Kuwabara J; Umakoshi A; Abe N; Sumida Y; Ohsumi S; Usa E; Taguchi K; Choudhury ME; Yano H; Matsumoto S; Kunieda T; Takahashi H; Yorozuya T; Watanabe Y; Tanaka J
[Ad] Address:Department of Gastrointestinal Surgery and Surgical Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Ehime University, Toon, Ehime, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Truncated CD200 stimulates tumor immunity leading to fewer lung metastases in a novel Wistar rat metastasis model.
[So] Source:Biochem Biophys Res Commun;496(2):542-548, 2018 02 05.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2104
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CD200 mediates immunosuppression in immune cells that express its receptor, CD200R. There are two CD200 variants; truncated CD200 that lacks the part of N-terminal sequence necessary for CD200R binding (CD200S) and full-length CD200 (CD200L). We established a novel lung metastasis model by subcutaneously transplanting C6 glioma cells into the backs of neonatal Wistar rats. All transplanted rats developed large back tumors, nearly 90% of which bore lung metastases. To compare the effects of CD200S and CD200L on tumor immunity, CD200L (C6-L)- or CD200S (C6-S)-expressing C6 cells were similarly transplanted. The results showed that 100% of rats with C6-L tumors developed lung metastases, while metastases were found in only 44% of rats with C6-S tumors (n = 25). Tumors disappeared in approximately 20% of the C6-S-bearing rats, and these animals evaded death 180 d after transplantation, while all C6-L tumor-bearing rats died after 45 d. Next generation sequencing revealed that C6-S tumors expressed chemokines and granzyme B at much higher levels than C6-L tumors. Flow cytometry revealed that C6-S tumors contained more dead cells and more CD45 cells, including natural killer cells and CD8 lymphocytes. In particular, multiple subsets of dendritic cells expressing CD11c, MHC class II, CD8, and/or CD103 were more abundant in C6-S than in C6-L tumors. These results suggested that CD200S induced the accumulation of multiple dendritic cell subsets that activated cytotoxic T lymphocytes, leading to the elimination of metastasizing tumor cells.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antigens, CD/immunology
Glioma/immunology
Glioma/pathology
Lung Neoplasms/immunology
Lung Neoplasms/secondary
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Antigens, CD/genetics
Dendritic Cells/immunology
Dendritic Cells/pathology
Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic
Glioma/genetics
Immune Tolerance
Immunity, Cellular
Lung/immunology
Lung/pathology
Lung Neoplasms/genetics
Lung Neoplasms/pathology
Mutation
Rats, Wistar
T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/immunology
T-Lymphocytes, Cytotoxic/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antigens, CD); 0 (antigens, CD200)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180118
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 261738 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29320813
[Au] Autor:Muoz-Carrillo JL; Muoz-Lpez JL; Muoz-Escobedo JJ; Maldonado-Tapia C; Gutirrez-Coronado O; Contreras-Cordero JF; Moreno-Garca MA
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Cell Biology and Microbiology, Academic Unit of Biological Sciences, Autonomous University of Zacatecas, Zacatecas, Zacatecas, Mxico.
[Ti] Title:Therapeutic Effects of Resiniferatoxin Related with Immunological Responses for Intestinal Inflammation in Trichinellosis.
[So] Source:Korean J Parasitol;55(6):587-599, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1738-0006
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The immune response against Trichinella spiralis at the intestinal level depends on the CD4+ T cells, which can both suppress or promote the inflammatory response through the synthesis of diverse cytokines. During the intestinal phase, the immune response is mixed (Th1/Th2) with the initial predominance of the Th1 response and the subsequent domination of Th2 response, which favor the development of intestinal pathology. In this context, the glucocorticoids (GC) are the pharmacotherapy for the intestinal inflammatory response in trichinellosis. However, its therapeutic use is limited, since studies have shown that treatment with GC suppresses the host immune system, favoring T. spiralis infection. In the search for novel pharmacological strategies that inhibit the Th1 immune response (proinflammatory) and assist the host against T. spiralis infection, recent studies showed that resiniferatoxin (RTX) had anti-inflammatory activity, which decreased the serum levels of IL-12, INF-γ, IL-1, TNF-α, NO, and PGE2, as well the number of eosinophils in the blood, associated with decreased intestinal pathology and muscle parasite burden. These researches demonstrate that RTX is capable to inhibit the production of Th1 cytokines, contributing to the defense against T. spiralis infection, which places it as a new potential drug modulator of the immune response.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Diterpenes/pharmacology
Diterpenes/therapeutic use
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/drug therapy
Intestinal Diseases, Parasitic/immunology
Intestines/immunology
Trichinellosis/drug therapy
Trichinellosis/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/immunology
Cytokines/metabolism
Eosinophils/immunology
Humans
Inflammation Mediators/metabolism
Leukocyte Count
Th1 Cells/immunology
Th2 Cells/immunology
Trichinella spiralis/immunology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Cytokines); 0 (Diterpenes); 0 (Inflammation Mediators); A5O6P1UL4I (resiniferatoxin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180112
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3347/kjp.2017.55.6.587

  9 / 261738 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29287883
[Au] Autor:Ma Y; Shi L; Zheng C
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Eye Ear Nose and Throat Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai Key Clinical Disciplines of Otorhinolaryngology, PR China.
[Ti] Title:Microarray analysis of lncRNA and mRNA expression profiles in mice with allergic rhinitis.
[So] Source:Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol;104:58-65, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1872-8464
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: We aimed to identify the effect of lncRNAs in CD4 T cells on Allergic rhinitis (AR). METHODS: The present study conducted a microarray to identify the expression profiles of lncRNA and mRNA in CD4 T cells in both AR murine models and normal controls. And qRT-PCR was used to confirm the results. GO and KEGG enrichment analysis were used to show all related pathways and a co-expression network was conducted to find lncRNAs which have high correlation with these pathways. RESULTS: The results showed that the two groups contained a total of 158 deregulated lncRNAs, of which 110 were upregulated and 48 were downregulated. And positive regulation of calcium ion transport, B cell activation, chemokine-signaling pathways and calcium-signaling pathways may be involved in the development of T cells in AR pathology. Finally, we can find the differentially expressed mRNA in the pathways related to T cell differentiation correlated with many deregulated lncRNAs. CONCLUSIONS: The present study was the first to show the differential expression profiles of lncRNAs in the CD4 T cells of an AR murine model, which may provide significant insights into AR pathogenesis and offer new treatment targets to alleviate it.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: CD4-Positive T-Lymphocytes/metabolism
Microarray Analysis/methods
RNA, Long Noncoding/metabolism
RNA, Messenger/metabolism
Rhinitis, Allergic/genetics
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Female
Mice
Mice, Inbred BALB C
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Rhinitis, Allergic/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (RNA, Long Noncoding); 0 (RNA, Messenger)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171231
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  10 / 261738 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28467721
[Au] Autor:Sareila O; Hagert C; Kelkka T; Linja M; Xu B; Kihlberg J; Holmdahl R
[Ad] Address:1 Medicity Research Laboratory, University of Turku , Turku, Finland .
[Ti] Title:Reactive Oxygen Species Regulate Both Priming and Established Arthritis, but with Different Mechanisms.
[So] Source:Antioxid Redox Signal;27(18):1473-1490, 2017 Dec 20.
[Is] ISSN:1557-7716
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIMS: Neutrophil cytosolic factor 1 (NCF1) is a key regulatory component of the phagocytic NOX2 complex, which produces reactive oxygen species (ROS). Polymorphism of the Ncf1 gene is associated with increased arthritis severity. In this study, we generated targeted Ncf1 knock-in mice with inducible Ncf1 expression and determined the critical time window during which the NOX2-derived ROS protect the mice from arthritis. RESULTS: Targeted Ncf1 knock-in mice lacked NOX2-derived ROS, and in vivo allelic conversion of Ncf1 by the CreER recombinase led to full protein expression and ROS production within 10 days. Mice in which Ncf1 had been activated before immunization with type II collagen (CII) developed only mild clinical symptoms of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA), whereas the ROS-deficient littermates had severe arthritis. The functional Ncf1 restricted the expansion of IL-17A-producing T cells specific for the immunodominant CII peptide. When the Ncf1 gene was activated after the priming phase, Ncf1-dependent protection from autoimmune arthritis was still observed, together with a reduced number of splenic monocytes but it was not associated with alterations in peptide-specific T cell response. The Ncf1-deficient mice expressed pronounced interferon signature, which could be normalized by conditional expression of Ncf1 and was also present in the Ncf1-mutated mouse during arthritis. Innovation and Conclusion: Ncf1 deficiency has been known to predispose to autoimmunity in both humans and rodents. Our in vivo results point to a regulatory role of NOX2-derived ROS not only during priming but also during the effector phase of CIA, most likely via different mechanisms. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 27, 1473-1490.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arthritis, Experimental/metabolism
NADPH Oxidases/genetics
NADPH Oxidases/metabolism
Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Arthritis, Experimental/chemically induced
Arthritis, Experimental/genetics
Collagen Type II/adverse effects
Disease Models, Animal
Gene Knock-In Techniques
Humans
Interleukin-17/metabolism
Mice
T-Lymphocytes/immunology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Collagen Type II); 0 (Interleukin-17); 0 (Reactive Oxygen Species); EC 1.6.3.- (NADPH Oxidases); EC 1.6.3.1 (neutrophil cytosolic factor 1)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170504
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1089/ars.2016.6981


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BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information