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[PMID]: 29524524
[Au] Autor:Suzuki M; Banno K; Usui T; Funasaka N; Segawa T; Kirihata T; Kamisako H; Ueda K; Munakata A
[Ad] Address:Nihon University, Kameino, Kanagawa, Japan. Electronic address: suzuki.miwa@nihon-u.ac.jp.
[Ti] Title:Seasonal changes in plasma levels of thyroid hormones and the effects of the hormones on cellular ATP content in common bottlenose dolphin.
[So] Source:Gen Comp Endocrinol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1095-6840
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In general, thyroid hormones (THs) stimulate cellular metabolism by inducing ATP utilization that collaterally leads to thermogenesis. However, in cetaceans, TH functions and the contribution of THs to cold adaptation are not fully understood. To investigate the role of THs in metabolism of cetaceans, seasonal changes in circulating levels in thyroxine (T ) were investigated in the common bottlenose dolphin Tursiops truncatus that were monitored under two different conditions for two years, with routine measurements of body temperature (BT), water temperature (WT) and air temperature (AT). The effects of THs on ATP synthesis were determined using cultured cells. Blood samples were collected from the species kept in different conditions at the Taiji Whale Museum located in the temperate zone and at Okinawa Expo Park in the subtropical zone. Circulating levels in total T for the dolphins at both aquaria and total T levels in dolphins at Taiji were measured by enzyme-linked immunoassay methods, and average concentrations were compared among seasons. To confirm the effects of THs on ATP synthesis, T or T was administrated to cultured kidney cells from the same species and cellular ATP contents were quantified at 0, 24, 48, 96 and 192 hours after administration. BT of common bottlenose dolphins in each aquarium was measured for health check every morning. WT in pools and AT were also measured every morning. Circulating T levels in autumn and winter were lower than those in spring and summer in dolphins in Taiji where WT and AT varied greatly from season to season. T levels showed a small difference between spring and autumn in dolphins in Okinawa with warmer WT and AT in smaller amplitude ranges than in Taiji. Total T level in Taiji was highest in spring and lowest in autumn as T levels, but not significant. The BT of dolphins in Taiji was also lower in autumn and winter compared with those in spring and summer, whereas the BT of dolphins in Okinawa fell in autumn but rose in summer, albeit to a lesser extent than in Taiji. Cellular ATP was increased by administration of both T and T compared to control. Collectively, these results suggest that the cellular metabolic activities regulated by THs may be enhanced in dolphins exposed to increasing surrounding temperature for lypolysis and reduced in dolphins exposed to colder conditions for fat accumulation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  2 / 47911 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29431947
[Au] Autor:Lapko IV; Kiryakov VA; Pavlovskaya NA; Oshkoderov OA; Klimkina KV
[Ti] Title:[Choice of informative laboratory biomarkers for the early identification of changes in neurohumoral regulation and carbohydrate exchange in workers of the mining and mechanical engineering industry].
[So] Source:Gig Sanit;95(11):1061-5, 2016.
[Is] ISSN:0016-9900
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:The diagnostic significance of hormones and integral indices of pituitary-adrenal, pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-gonadal system and carbohydrate metabolism (ACTH (corticotropin), aldosterone, cortisol, TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone), free triiodothyronine (fT3), free thyroxine (fT4), luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), total and free testosterone, insulin, integral pituitary-adrenal index (IPAI), the pituitary-thyroid index (PTI), indices of carbohydrate metabolism (Caro and HOMA-IR) was studied for the early diagnostics of disorders of neurohumoral regulation in workers of mining and mechanical engineering industries. The most informative indices, permitting to identify disorders of carbohydrate metabolism are established to be indices of insulin resistance (index Caro and index NOMA-IR) and the determination of insulin in serum. For the identification of changes in pituitary adrenal, pituitary-thyroid and pituitary-gonadal system in patients with vibration disease, sensory-neural hearing loss, comorbidity indexes IGNI, ITI, concentrations of LH and total testosterone are of the most diagnostically significance.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Adrenocorticotropic Hormone/blood
Follicle Stimulating Hormone/blood
Insulin/blood
Occupational Diseases
Thyrotropin/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Biomarkers/blood
Carbohydrate Metabolism/physiology
Extraction and Processing Industry/methods
Extraction and Processing Industry/standards
Female
Humans
Hypothalamo-Hypophyseal System/metabolism
Male
Middle Aged
Occupational Diseases/blood
Occupational Diseases/diagnosis
Occupational Diseases/etiology
Occupational Diseases/prevention & control
Occupational Health
Pituitary-Adrenal System/metabolism
Reproducibility of Results
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (Insulin); 9002-60-2 (Adrenocorticotropic Hormone); 9002-68-0 (Follicle Stimulating Hormone); 9002-71-5 (Thyrotropin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 47911 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522172
[Au] Autor:Makrygiannakis MA; Kaklamanos EG; Athanasiou AE
[Ad] Address:Hamdan Bin Mohammed College of Dental Medicine, Mohammed Bin Rashid University of Medicine and Health Sciences, Dubai, United Arab Emirates.
[Ti] Title:Does common prescription medication affect the rate of orthodontic tooth movement? A systematic review.
[So] Source:Eur J Orthod;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1460-2210
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: As the taking of any medication may theoretically affect the complex pathways responsible for periodontal tissue homeostasis and the events leading to orthodontic tooth movement, it is considered important for the orthodontist to be able to identify prospective patients' history and patterns of pharmaceutical consumption. Objective: To systematically investigate and appraise the quality of the available evidence regarding the effect of commonly prescribed medications on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Search methods: Search without restrictions in eight databases and hand searching until June 2017. Selection criteria: Controlled studies investigating the effect of commonly prescribed medications with emphasis on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Data collection and analysis: Following study retrieval and selection, relevant data was extracted and the risk of bias was assessed using the SYRCLE's Risk of Bias Tool. Results: Twenty-seven animal studies, involving various pharmacologic and orthodontic interventions, were finally identified. Most studies were assessed to be at unclear or high risk of bias. The rate of orthodontic tooth movement was shown to increase after the administration of diazepam, Vitamin C and pantoprazole, while simvastatin, atorvastatin, calcium compounds, strontium ranelate, propranolol, losartan, famotidine, cetirizine, and metformin decreased the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. No interference with the rate of orthodontic tooth movement was reported for phenytoin, phenobarbital and zinc compounds, whereas, inconsistent or conflicting effects were noted after the administration of L-thyroxine, lithium compounds, fluoxetine and insulin. The quality of the available evidence was considered at best as low. Conclusions: Commonly prescribed medications may exhibit variable effects on the rate of orthodontic tooth movement. Although the quality of evidence was considered at best as low, raising reservations about the strength of the relevant recommendations, the clinician should be capable of identifying patients taking medications and should take into consideration the possible implications related to the proposed treatment. Registration: PROSPERO (CRD42015029130).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/ejo/cjy001

  4 / 47911 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519736
[Au] Autor:Rajabi M; Yalcin M; Mousa SA
[Ad] Address:The Pharmaceutical Research Institute, Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences, Rensselaer, NY, USA.
[Ti] Title:Synthesis of new analogs of tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) as novel angiogenesis inhibitors for treatment of cancer.
[So] Source:Bioorg Med Chem Lett;, 2018 Feb 26.
[Is] ISSN:1464-3405
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In the angiogenesis process, integrins, which are members of a family of cell surface transmembrane receptors, play a critical role particularly in blood vessel formation and the local release of vascular growth factors. Thyroid hormones such as l-thyroxine (T ) and 3,5,3'-triiodo-l-thyronine (T ) promote angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation via integrin αvß3 receptor. At or near an arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) recognition site on the binding pocket of integrin α ß , tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac, a deaminated derivative of T ) is a thyrointegrin receptor antagonist and blocks the actions of T and T as well as different growth factors-mediated angiogenesis. In this study, we synthesized novel tetrac analogs by modifying the phenolic moiety of tetrac and tested them for their anti-angiogenesis activity using a Matrigel plug model for angiogenesis in mice. Pharmacological activity results showed that tetrac can accommodate numerous modifications and maintain its anti-angiogenesis activity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 47911 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518761
[Au] Autor:Philippou A; Maridaki M; Tenta R; Koutsilieris M
[Ad] Address:Department of Experimental Physiology, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece.
[Ti] Title:Hormonal responses following eccentric exercise in humans.
[So] Source:Hormones (Athens);16(4):405-413, 2017 Oct.
[Is] ISSN:1109-3099
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Mechanically overloaded muscle and its subsequent damage are strong stimuli for eliciting acute hormonal changes, while the muscle adaptation which occurs following exercise-induced muscle damage may involve complex hormonal responses before the completion of muscle regeneration. The purpose of this study was to investigate systemic responses of various hormones, as well as secreted proteins that are exercise-regulated and associated with muscle adaptation, for several days after eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage in humans. DESIGN: Nine young male volunteers performed 50 maximal eccentric muscle actions using the knee extensor muscles of both legs. Blood samples were drawn before and at 6, 48 and 120 hours post exercise and serum levels of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), cortisol, prolactin, thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), free thyroxine (fT4), irisin, follistatin and sclerostin were measured. Myoglobin (Mb) concentration and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were also evaluated as indirect markers of muscle damage. RESULTS: Significant alterations in Mb and LDH were observed over time after eccentric exercise (p=0.039-0.001). A late serum increase in fT4 and decrease in irisin levels, along with an early and persistent decrease in IGFBP-3 levels, were observed following the muscle-damaging exercise (p=0.049-0.016). GH, cortisol, prolactin, TSH, follistatin and sclerostin exhibited moderate changes during the recovery period after exercise, though without reaching statistical significance (p>0.05), while correlational analyses revealed significant associationsbetween GH and IGFBP-3, prolactin and sclerostin over time (p=0.049-0.001). CONCLUSIONS: The significant hormonal responses observed in this study may indicate their involvement in the regenerative mechanisms following muscle damage, potentially as part of a regulatory network to support a normal adaptation process after muscle-damaging exercise.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.14310/horm.2002.1761

  6 / 47911 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518214
[Au] Autor:Ramhøj L; Hass U; Boberg J; Scholze M; Christiansen S; Nielsen F; Axelstad M
[Ad] Address:Division of Diet, Disease Prevention and Toxicology, National Food Institute, Technical University of Denmark, Kemitorvet Building 202, Kgs. Lyngby DK-2800, Denmark.
[Ti] Title:Perfluorohexane Sulfonate (PFHxS) and a Mixture of Endocrine Disrupters Reduce Thyroxine Levels and Cause Anti-Androgenic Effects in Rats.
[So] Source:Toxicol Sci;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1096-0929
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The developmental toxicity of perfluorohexane sulfonate (PFHxS) is largely unknown despite widespread environmental contamination and presence in human serum, tissues and milk.To thoroughly investigate PFHxS toxicity in developing rats and to mimic a realistic human exposure situation, we examined a low dose close to human relevant PFHxS exposure, and combined the dose-response studies of PFHxS with a fixed dose of twelve environmentally relevant endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDmix).Two reproductive toxicity studies in time-mated Wistar rats exposed throughout gestation and lactation were performed. Study 1 included control, two doses of PFHxS and two doses of PFHxS+EDmix (n = 5-7). Study 2 included control, 0.05, 5 or 25 mg/kg body weight/day PFHxS, EDmix-only, 0.05, 5 or 25 mg PFHxS/kg plus EDmix (n = 13-20).PFHxS caused no overt toxicity in dams and offspring but decreased male pup birth weight and slightly increased liver weights at high doses and in combination with the EDmix. A marked effect on T4 levels was seen in both dams and offspring, with significant reductions from 5 mg/kg/day. The EDmix caused anti-androgenic effects in male offspring, manifested as slight decreases in anogenital distance, increased nipple retention and reductions of the weight of epididymides, ventral prostrate and vesicular seminalis.PFHxS can induce developmental toxicity and in addition results of the co-exposure studies indicated that PFHxS and the EDmix potentiate the effect of each other on various endpoints, despite their different modes of action. Hence, risk assessment may underestimate toxicity when mixture toxicity and background exposures are not taken into account.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/toxsci/kfy055

  7 / 47911 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29436670
[Au] Autor:Nam SM; Kim JW; Yoo DY; Jung HY; Chung JY; Kim DW; Hwang IK; Yoon YS
[Ad] Address:Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Veterinary Medicine and Research Institute for Veterinary Science, Seoul National University, Seoul 08826, Republic of Korea.
[Ti] Title:Hypothyroidism increases cyclooxygenase-2 levels and pro-inflammatory response and decreases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampus.
[So] Source:Mol Med Rep;17(4):5782-5788, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1791-3004
[Cp] Country of publication:Greece
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The present study investigated the effects of hypothyroidism on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and pro­inflammatory cytokines in the dentate gyrus to elucidate the roles of COX­2 in the hypothyroid hippocampus. Hypothyroidism was induced in rats by treating with 0.03% 2­mercapto­1­methyl­imidazole dissolved in drinking water for 5 weeks. The animals were sacrificed at 12 weeks of age. Hypothyroidism rats exhibited decreased triiodothyronine and thyroxine levels in the serum, while the levels of thyroid­stimulating hormone and the weight of thyroid glands were significantly higher in the hypothyroid rats compared with those in the vehicle­treated group. COX­2 immunoreactivity was significantly increased in the hippocampal CA2/3 region and the dentate gyrus compared with the vehicle­treated group. Levels of pro­inflammatory cytokines including interleukin (IL)­1ß, IL­6 and tumor necrosis factor­α were significantly higher in the hippocampal homogenates of hypothyroid rats. Cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation based on Ki67 and doublecortin immunohistochemistry were decreased in the dentate gyrus of hypothyroid rats compared with those in the vehicle­treated group. These results suggested that hypothyroidism­mediated COX­2 expression affected hippocampal plasticity by upregulating the levels of pro­inflammatory cytokines in the hippocampus. Therefore, COX­2 may be suggested as a candidate molecule for preventing hypothyroidism­induced neurological side effects.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3892/mmr.2018.8605

  8 / 47911 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28942280
[Au] Autor:Edwards TM; Hamlin HJ; Freymiller H; Green S; Thurman J; Guillette LJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Biology, University of the South, Sewanee, TN, USA; Department of Biology, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL, USA; School of Biological Sciences, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, LA, USA. Electronic address: theamedwards@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Nitrate induces a type 1 diabetic profile in alligator hatchlings.
[So] Source:Ecotoxicol Environ Saf;147:767-775, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1090-2414
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects 1 in 300 children by age 18. T1D is caused by inflammation-induced loss of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells, leading to high blood glucose and a host of downstream complications. Although multiple genes are associated with T1D risk, only 5% of genetically susceptible individuals actually develop clinical disease. Moreover, a growing number of T1D cases occur in geographic clusters and among children with low risk genotypes. These observations suggest that environmental factors contribute to T1D etiology. One potential factor, supported primarily by epidemiological studies, is the presence of nitrate and nitrite in drinking water. To test this hypothesis, female hatchling alligators were exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of nitrate in their tank water (reference, 10mg/L, or 100mg/L NO -N) from hatch through 5 weeks or 5 months of age. At each time point, endpoints related to T1D were investigated: plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides, testosterone, estradiol, and thyroxine; pancreas, fat body, and thyroid weights; weight gain or loss; presence of immune cells in the pancreas; and pancreatic beta cell number, assessed by antibody staining of nkx6.1 protein. Internal dosing of nitrate was confirmed by measuring plasma and urine nitrate levels and whole blood methemoglobin. Cluster analysis indicated that high nitrate exposure (most animals exposed to 100mg/L NO3-N and one alligator exposed to 10mg/L NO3-N) induced a profile of endpoints consistent with early T1D that could be detected after 5 weeks and was more strongly present after 5 months. Our study supports epidemiological data correlating elevated nitrate with T1D onset in humans, and highlights nitrate as a possible environmental contributor to the etiology of T1D, possibly through its role as a nitric oxide precursor.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Alligators and Crocodiles/blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/chemically induced
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/chemically induced
Endocrine Disruptors/toxicity
Nitrates/toxicity
Water Pollutants, Chemical/toxicity
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Alligators and Crocodiles/growth & development
Animals
Blood Glucose/analysis
Diabetes Mellitus, Experimental/blood
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 1/blood
Dose-Response Relationship, Drug
Endocrine Disruptors/pharmacokinetics
Environmental Monitoring/methods
Female
Gonadal Steroid Hormones/blood
Nitrates/pharmacokinetics
Organ Size/drug effects
Thyroxine/blood
Triglycerides/blood
Water Pollutants, Chemical/pharmacokinetics
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Blood Glucose); 0 (Endocrine Disruptors); 0 (Gonadal Steroid Hormones); 0 (Nitrates); 0 (Triglycerides); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical); Q51BO43MG4 (Thyroxine)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170925
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 47911 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29517803
[Au] Autor:Jacobson MH; Howards PP; Darrow LA; Meadows JW; Kesner JS; Spencer JB; Terrell ML; Marcus M
[Ad] Address:Department of Epidemiology, Rollins School of Public Health, Emory University, Atlanta, GA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Thyroid hormones and menstrual cycle function in a longitudinal cohort of premenopausal women.
[So] Source:Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1365-3016
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported that hyperthyroid and hypothyroid women experience menstrual irregularities more often compared with euthyroid women, but reasons for this are not well-understood and studies on thyroid hormones among euthyroid women are lacking. In a prospective cohort study of euthyroid women, this study characterised the relationship between thyroid hormone concentrations and prospectively collected menstrual function outcomes. METHODS: Between 2004-2014, 86 euthyroid premenopausal women not lactating or taking hormonal medications participated in a study measuring menstrual function. Serum thyroid hormones were measured before the menstrual function study began. Women then collected first morning urine voids and completed daily bleeding diaries every day for three cycles. Urinary oestrogen and progesterone metabolites (estrone 3-glucuronide (E 3G) and pregnanediol 3-glucuronide (Pd3G)) and follicle-stimulating hormone were measured and adjusted for creatinine (Cr). RESULTS: Total thyroxine (T ) concentrations were positively associated with Pd3G and E 3G. Women with higher (vs lower) T had greater luteal phase maximum Pd3G (Pd3G = 11.7 µg/mg Cr for women with high T vs Pd3G = 9.5 and 8.1 µg/mg Cr for women with medium and low T , respectively) and greater follicular phase maximum E 3G (E 3G = 41.7 ng/mg Cr for women with high T vs E 3G = 34.3 and 33.7 ng/mg Cr for women with medium and low T , respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Circulating thyroid hormone concentrations were associated with subtle differences in menstrual cycle function outcomes, particularly sex steroid hormone levels in healthy women. Results contribute to the understanding of the relationship between thyroid function and the menstrual cycle, and may have implications for fertility and chronic disease.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/ppe.12462

  10 / 47911 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29346569
[Au] Autor:Hales C; Taylor PN; Channon S; Paradice R; McEwan K; Zhang L; Gyedu M; Bakhsh A; Okosieme O; Muller I; Draman MS; Gregory JW; Dayan C; Lazarus JH; Rees DA; Ludgate M
[Ad] Address:School of Medicine, Cardiff University, UK.
[Ti] Title:Controlled Antenatal Thyroid Screening II: effect of treating maternal sub-optimal thyroid function on child cognition.
[So] Source:J Clin Endocrinol Metab;, 2018 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1945-7197
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Context & Objective: The Controlled Antenatal Thyroid Screening (CATS) study investigated treatment for suboptimal gestational thyroid function (SGTF) on childhood cognition and found no difference in IQ at 3 years between children of treated and untreated SGTF mothers. We have measured IQ in the same children at age 9.5-years and included children from normal-GTF mothers. Design, Setting & Participants: One examiner, blinded to participant group, assessed children's IQ (WISC-IV), long-term memory and motor function (NEPSY-II) from children of 119 treated and 98 untreated SGTF mothers plus children of 232 mothers with normal-GTF. Logistic regression explored the odds and percentages of IQ<85 in the groups. Results: There was no difference in IQ<85 between children of mothers with normal-GTF and combined SGTF i.e. treated and untreated (fully adjusted OR=1.15 (95% CI 0.52, 2.51) p=0.731). Furthermore, there was no significant effect of treatment (untreated OR=1.33 (95% CI 0.53, 3.34), treated OR=0.75 (95% CI 0.27, 2.06) p=0.576). IQ< 85 was 6.03% in normal-GTF, 7.56% in treated and 11.22% in untreated groups. Analyses accounting for treated-SGTF women with FT4 >97.5th centile of the entire CATS-I cohort revealed no significant effect on child's IQ<85 in CATS-II. IQ at age 3 predicted IQ at age 9.5 (p<0.0001) and accounted for 45% of the variation. Conclusions: Maternal thyroxine during pregnancy did not improve child cognition at age 9.5 years. Our findings confirmed CATS-I and suggest that the lack of treatment effect may be due to the similar proportion of IQ<85 in children of women with normal-GTF and SGTF.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1210/jc.2017-02378


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