Database : MEDLINE
Search on : tinea and pedis [Words]
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[PMID]: 28101694
[Au] Autor:Dhib I; Khammari I; Yaacoub A; Hadj Slama F; Ben Saïd M; Zemni R; Fathallah A
[Ad] Address:Parasitology-Mycology Laboratory, Faculty of Medicine, Farhat Hached University Hospital, Mohamed El Karoui Street, 4002, Sousse, Tunisia. dhib.imen@yahoo.fr.
[Ti] Title:Relationship Between Phenotypic and Genotypic Characteristics of Trichophyton mentagrophytes Strains Isolated from Patients with Dermatophytosis.
[So] Source:Mycopathologia;182(5-6):487-493, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1573-0832
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:According to epidemiological, clinical and mycological criteria, it has long been admitted that the Trichophyton mentagrophytes species includes two varieties: a zoophilic variety (var. mentagrophytes) and an anthropophilic variety (var. interdigitale) that involve the upper and the lower part of the body, respectively. The further application of molecular techniques to the characterization of dermatophyte strains showed that this classification is unreliable. The aim of our study was to assess the usefulness of PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) and sequencing in the characterization of T. mentagrophytes strains taken from Tunisian patients. The study was carried out in 2008 in the laboratory of Parasitology-Mycology of Farhat Hached University Hospital, Sousse, Tunisia. A total of 133 strains were isolated from 133 patients addressed to the laboratory for dermatological lesions very evocative of dermatomycosis. Eighty strains were isolated from lesions located on the lower part of the body (onychomycosis, tinea pedis) and 53 strains from the upper part of the body (tinea capitis, tinea corporis). All strains were submitted to mycological examination (direct microscopic examination and culture on Sabouraud medium) and further investigated by using RFLP analysis of the PCR-amplified ITS1-5.8 s-ITS2 region of the ribosomal DNA and the MvaI restriction enzyme. In addition, 62 strains were further submitted to a sequencing of the ITS1-5.8 s-ITS2 region. On the basis of mycological criteria, all strains were diagnosed as T. mentagrophytes. All strains produced the same RFLP pattern and were identified as T. mentagrophytes interdigitale regardless of the location of lesions. Out of the 62 sequenced strains, 16 were found anthropophilic and 46 were zoophilic. In conclusion, all strains provisionally diagnosed as T. mentagrophytes on the basis of mycological criteria were shown to belong to T. interdigitale by using PCR-RFLP and sequencing irrespective of the site of lesions. The predominance of zoophilic strains needs further investigation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 171030
[Lr] Last revision date:171030
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11046-017-0110-3

  2 / 1644 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28004227
[Au] Autor:Su H; Li L; Cheng B; Zhu J; Zhang Q; Xu J; Zhu M
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Huashan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, 200040, China.
[Ti] Title:Trichophyton rubrum Infection Characterized by Majocchi's Granuloma and Deeper Dermatophytosis: Case Report and Review of Published Literature.
[So] Source:Mycopathologia;182(5-6):549-554, 2017 Jun.
[Is] ISSN:1573-0832
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Infections caused by Trichophyton rubrum are very common in dermatological disease. It most often appears as superficial cutaneous mycosis, such as tinea manuum, tinea pedis, and tinea corporis. However, deep infection caused by T. rubrum was rarely reported. We describe a case of mixed type of deep infection caused by T. rubrum in a 45-year-old man with no significant immunodeficiency. This patient had a history of onychomycosis on the toenails without regular treatment for nearly 6 years. And, he had erythema, papule, and nodules on the submandibular area, neck, and chest for almost 1 year. After treated with intravenous infusion of cefotiam for 2 weeks, the lesion aggravated. The fungal direct microscopic examination of pyogenic fluid was positive, and the fungal cultures that produced reddish-brown and yellow pigment showed cottony, wooly, and white colony. After the DNA sequencing, it was identified as T. rubrum. We gave the patient oral terbinafine 250 mg per day and bifonazole cream for external use. Six months later, the patient's skin lesion was disappeared, and healthy nail growth was seen in two-thirds of nail bed. The terbinafine is effective against deep infection caused by T. rubrum.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1612
[Cu] Class update date: 171030
[Lr] Last revision date:171030
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s11046-016-0099-z

  3 / 1644 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28931796
[Au] Autor:Suzuki S; Mano Y; Furuya N; Fujitani K
[Ad] Address:Graduate School of Health Care Science, Bunkyo Gakuin University.
[Ti] Title:Epidemiological Study on Trichophyton Disseminating from the Feet of the Elderly.
[So] Source:Nihon Eiseigaku Zasshi;72(3):177-183, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1882-6482
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To grasp the colonization status of Trichophyton in terms of spreading rate, we investigated the intergenerational epidemiological difference in the spreading rate of Trichophyton from teenagers to the elderly aged over 65. In addition, the elderly people were divided into two groups: those living at nursing homes and those living at their homes. We compared the two groups in terms of the difference in the spreading rate of Trichophyton. METHODS: Spreading rate was investigated by identifying the fungi collected by the cotton swab sampling method. The correlation between the responses to the questionnaire survey, which was conducted after the sample collection, and the spreading rate of Trichophyton was analyzed. RESULTS: The spreading rate of Trichophyton was 23.3%. It was confirmed that the spreading rate in general adults was 9.1%, whereas that in elderly people was 40.8%, which is significantly high. Also, it was confirmed that T. mentagrophytes shows a higher spreading rate among general adults, whereas T. rubrum shows a higher spreading rate among the elderly. Between the elderly living at nursing homes and those living at their homes, although no statistically significant difference was confirmed, the former tended to show a higher spreading rate than the latter. Also, the results of this study showed that spreading rate of Trichophyton and the detachment of the skin of the toes were significantly related. CONCLUSIONS: We found that the risk of spreading of Trichophyton increases with age. Particularly among elderly people aged over 65, taking some actions that prevent the spread of tinea pedis is recommended.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Foot/microbiology
Tinea Pedis/microbiology
Tinea Pedis/transmission
Tinea/microbiology
Tinea/transmission
Trichophyton/isolation & purification
Trichophyton/pathogenicity
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Age Factors
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Female
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data
Tinea/epidemiology
Tinea/prevention & control
Tinea Pedis/epidemiology
Tinea Pedis/prevention & control
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171024
[Lr] Last revision date:171024
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170921
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1265/jjh.72.177

  4 / 1644 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29052949
[Au] Autor:Zhong A; Li G; Wang D; Sun Y; Zou X; Li B
[Ad] Address:Department of Plastic Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022, China.
[Ti] Title:The Risks and External Effects of Diabetic Foot Ulcer on Diabetic Patients: A Hospital-based Survey in Wuhan area, China.
[So] Source:Wound Repair Regen;, 2017 Oct 20.
[Is] ISSN:1524-475X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) is a common complication observed in diabetic patients and affects diabetic patients in multiple ways. Severe DFU even leads to amputation in many cases. Early detection and intervention of DFU in diabetic patients can significantly relieve the pain caused by the ulcer and also keep patients from losing limbs in severe cases. In this study, the risks of diabetic patients getting DFU were estimated through a hospital-based survey. This survey collected information from hospitalized diabetic patients in Wuhan City, Hubei Province, China, using a questionnaire. This investigation includes studies from two stages with 502 diabetic patients from 20 hospitals in Wuhan City. The results suggested that patients with a long history of diabetes are often associated with a high risk of DFU (χ =11.428, p=0.0007), smoking (χ =8.386, p=0.0007), diabetic complications (χ =13.484, p<0.0001), and especially patients with diabetic foot complications (χ =57.6621, p<0.0001). Foot lesions appeared to be important attributors to DFU since our data demonstrated close correlations between DFU and patients with calluses/corns (χ =4.584, p=0.0323), tinea pedis (χ =4.030, p=0.0447), and cracked skin (χ =8.712, p=0.0032). Only a small number of patients seek for the assistance from specialists, such as trimming toenails (3.4%), removing corn or calluses (1.4%) or treating wounds (11.78%), when they are suffering from foot problems. The findings of this study can potentially be utilized to develop an early DFU diagnostic method in diabetic patients and can provide objective evidence for suggesting that patients who are suffering from foot problems should seek professional help. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171020
[Lr] Last revision date:171020
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/wrr.12589

  5 / 1644 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29050446
[Au] Autor:Drago L; Micali G; Papini M; Piraccini BM; Veraldi S
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Clinical Analyses, IRCCS Galeazzi Hospital, Università degli Studi di Milano, Milan, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Management of mycoses in daily practice.
[So] Source:G Ital Dermatol Venereol;152(6):642-650, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1827-1820
[Cp] Country of publication:Italy
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The guideline recommendations, albeit founded on thorough reviews of clinically relevant literature data, are often not immediately adaptable to everyday life. Considering the marked heterogeneity of superficial mycoses, each of them requires specific management in a real life context; in all cases diagnostic confirmation is required with microscopic and culture examination. In tinea capitis oral therapy is necessary (minimum six weeks) and should be continued until clinical and, above all, mycological healing. In cases of tinea corporis, cruris or pedis, it may be necessary to associate oral therapy to topical treatment. The main oral antifungals are fluconazole, itraconazole and terbinafine. Fluconazole has favorable pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics, and is effective in most superficial mycoses, for example in cases of diffuse or recurrent pityriasis versicolor in which oral therapy with an azole derivative is useful. Topical treatment, lasting 6-12 months, is indicated in onychomycosis that is confined to one nail. In frequent cases of onychomycosis involving multiple nails or recurrence, oral therapy is necessary. Pharmacological history is important, given the possible interactions of some systemic drugs. In chronic or recurrent relapsing vulvovaginitis, first-choice therapy is oral fluconazole with a therapeutic regimen that respects the mycotic biorhythm (200 mg on days 1, 4, 11, 26, and subsequently 200 mg/week for 3 months).
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171020
[Lr] Last revision date:171020
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.23736/S0392-0488.17.05683-8

  6 / 1644 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29049259
[Au] Autor:Takehara K; Amemiya A; Mugita Y; Tsunemi Y; Seko Y; Ohashi Y; Ueki K; Kadowaki T; Oe M; Nagase T; Ikeda M; Sanada H
[Ad] Address:In Tokyo, Japan, Kimie Takehara, PhD, RN, is a Lecturer, Department of Nursing Administration/Advanced Clinical Nursing, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo; Ayumi Amemiya, PhD, RN, is an Assistant Professor, Department of Nursing Physiology, Graduate School of Nursing, Chiba University; Yuko Mugita, PhD, RN, is an Assistant Professor, Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo; Yuichiro Tsunemi, PhD, MD, is an Associate Professor, Department of Dermatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University; Yoko Seko, RN, is a Nurse Manager, The University of Tokyo Hospital; Yumiko Ohashi, RN, is a Ward Nurse, The University of Tokyo Hospital; Kohjiro Ueki, PhD, MD, is a Director, Diabetes Research Center, Research Institute National Center for Global Health and Medicine; Takashi Kadowaki, PhD, MD, is a Professor, Department of Metabolic Diseases, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo; Makoto Oe, PhD, RN, is a Project Associate Professor, Global Nursing Research Center, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo; Takashi Nagase, PhD, MD, is a Project Lecturer, Department of Gerontological Nursing/Wound Care Management, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo; Mari Ikeda, PhD, RN, is a Professor, School of Nursing, Nursing Administration, Tokyo Women's Medical University; and Hiromi Sanada, PhD, WOCN, RN, is a Professor, Department of Nursing Administration/Advanced Clinical Nursing, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Japan.
[Ti] Title:The Association between Tinea Pedis and Feet-Washing Behavior in Patients with Diabetes: A Cross-sectional Study.
[So] Source:Adv Skin Wound Care;30(11):510-516, 2017 Nov.
[Is] ISSN:1538-8654
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To examine the correlations between elements of feet-washing behavior, presence of tinea pedis (TP), and patients' background characteristics in order to identify a concrete intervention method to prevent TP. DESIGN AND PARTICIPANTS: A cross-sectional study of 30 patients with diabetes (16 with TP) who were admitted to or visited the university hospital. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The presence of TP was confirmed by the detection of dermatophytes by direct microscopy. Data on elements of feet-washing behavior, such as scrubbing between the toes, were collected by observing recorded videos of participants normally washing their feet as they do at home. The patients' background characteristics included demographic data; diabetes-related factors; patient knowledge regarding diabetes, foot problems, and TP prevention; purpose for feet washing; and any difficulties in feet washing. MAIN RESULTS: The number of times patients scrubbed between their toes while washing with soap was significantly lower in patients with TP (odds ratio, 0.95; P = .036; with a cutoff value of 35 times) and those who had difficulty in reaching their feet with their hands (B = -14.42, P = .041). CONCLUSIONS: An effective foot-washing protocol should include specific instructions for patients to scrub between their toes at least 35 times in all 8 spaces while washing with soap. Appropriate advice is also needed for individuals who have difficulty reaching their feet with their hands. Education about appropriate foot-washing behavior may potentially prevent TP.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171019
[Lr] Last revision date:171019
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/01.ASW.0000525903.07883.8f

  7 / 1644 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28940733
[Au] Autor:Toukabri N; Corpologno S; Bougnoux ME; El Euch D; Sadfi-Zouaoui N; Simonetti G
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Mycology, Pathologies and Biomarkers, Faculty of Sciences of Tunis, University Tunis El Manar, Tunis, Tunisia.
[Ti] Title:In vitro biofilms and antifungal susceptibility of dermatophyte and non-dermatophyte moulds involved in foot mycosis.
[So] Source:Mycoses;, 2017 Sep 22.
[Is] ISSN:1439-0507
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Tinea pedis and onychomycosis are among the commonest fungal diseases in the world. Dermatophytes and, less frequently, non-dermatophyte moulds are aetiological agents of foot mycosis and are capable of forming biofilms. Fungal biofilm has demonstrated increasing drug resistance. This work aims to evaluate, in vitro, the ability to form biofilm and the susceptibility to antifungal drugs of sessile dermatophytes and non-dermatophyte moulds involved in foot mycosis. Thirty-six dermatophytes and non-dermatophyte moulds isolated from Tunisian patients with foot mycoses, and identified with MALDI-TOF have been tested. MICs of fluconazole, econazole, itraconazole, terbinafine and griseofulvin were carried out using CLSI broth microdilution method. The ability to form biofilm and antifungal activities of drugs against fungal biofilm formation has been quantified by Crystal Violet and Safranin Red staining. Biomass quantification revealed that all species studied were able to form biofilms in vitro after 72 hours. Fluconazole, econazole, itraconazole and terbinafine inhibited fungal growth with MIC values ranging from 0.031 to >64 µg mL . The best antifungal activity has been obtained with terbinafine against Fusarium solani. Econazole showed the highest activity against fungal biofilm formation. These findings can help clinicians to develop the appropriate therapy of foot mycosis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171016
[Lr] Last revision date:171016
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/myc.12706

  8 / 1644 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28566667
[Au] Autor:Tsunemi Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Tokyo Women's Medical University.
[Ti] Title:Dermatophyte Antigen Kit.
[So] Source:Med Mycol J;58(2):J51-J54, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1882-0476
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:The dermatophyte antigen kit uses monoclonal antibodies that react with polysaccharides present in the dermatophyte cell wall to detect dermatophyte antigens in specimens based on the principle of immunochromatography. Clinical studies showed that the kit was very useful in the diagnosis of tinea unguium but not tinea pedis. The kit was therefore further developed as an in vitro diagnostic tool for tinea unguium and was approved by the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency of Japan. The kit's extraction solution can extract antigens from nail specimens quickly and efficiently. When direct microscopy fails to detect fungal elements in a specimen of suspected tinea unguium, the kit can be used so that positive samples are re-examined by direct microscopy, in order to reduce the likelihood of false-negative detection. In addition, in settings where direct microscopy is unavailable, the kit can be used so that treatment for dermatophytes is withheld when results are negative. Such an approach can reduce both wasteful treatment and medical costs. It is important to note that the kit is used to complement conventional fungus testing methods and that direct microscopy must be used to confirm the final morphological diagnosis of the pathogenic fungal infection. Use of a combination of direct microscopy and this kit should improve the accuracy of diagnosis of tinea unguium.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Arthrodermataceae/immunology
Onychomycosis/diagnosis
Reagent Kits, Diagnostic
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Antibodies, Monoclonal
Antigens, Fungal/immunology
Antigens, Fungal/isolation & purification
Arthrodermataceae/pathogenicity
Arthrodermataceae/ultrastructure
False Negative Reactions
Fungal Polysaccharides/immunology
Humans
Immunochromatography
Microscopy
Onychomycosis/diagnostic imaging
Onychomycosis/microbiology
Sensitivity and Specificity
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Monoclonal); 0 (Antigens, Fungal); 0 (Fungal Polysaccharides); 0 (Reagent Kits, Diagnostic)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171015
[Lr] Last revision date:171015
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170601
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3314/mmj.17.005

  9 / 1644 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28566665
[Au] Autor:Otani M
[Ad] Address:Division of Hospital Pharmacy, Kyoundo Hospital.
[Ti] Title:Treatment of Tinea Pedis in Elderly Patients Using External Preparations.
[So] Source:Med Mycol J;58(2):J35-J41, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1882-0476
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:Infection rate of tinea pedis is high in the elderly, wherein treatment by a dermatologist should be considered to prevent infecting their family members. About 90 percent of cases with tinea pedis is treated only using external preparations. In treating the elderly with tinea pedis using external preparation, we should take into consideration that the elderly have thinner and weaker skin compared to younger people. There are many kinds of dosage form (cream, ointments, lotion, spray, and so on) for external preparations to treat tinea pedis. Generally, liquid forms such as lotions and sprays cause stronger irritation compared to ointments and creams, thus, caution should be taken for side effects when applying them to the elderly. Contact dermatitis is the most frequent side effect of external preparations. Caution should also be taken for the type of additives used. The composition of the preparation should be checked when changing dosage forms, or when switching brand-name drugs to generic drugs. Since the adherence rate of external preparations is low, it is preferable to use those with strong antibacterial activity and only have to be applied once a day.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antifungal Agents/administration & dosage
Tinea Pedis/drug therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adjuvants, Pharmaceutic
Administration, Topical
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Aging/pathology
Antifungal Agents/adverse effects
Dosage Forms
Drug Substitution
Drugs, Generic
Female
Humans
Male
Medication Adherence
Skin/pathology
Tinea Pedis/epidemiology
Tinea Pedis/microbiology
Tinea Pedis/pathology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Adjuvants, Pharmaceutic); 0 (Antifungal Agents); 0 (Dosage Forms); 0 (Drugs, Generic)
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171015
[Lr] Last revision date:171015
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170601
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3314/mmj.17.003

  10 / 1644 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28329539
[Au] Autor:Myers K; Terushkin V; Meehan SA; Cohen DE
[Ad] Address:Ronald O. Perelman Department of Dermatology, NYU School of Medicine, NYU Langone Medical Center.
[Ti] Title:Gyrate erythema in the setting of tinea pedis.
[So] Source:Dermatol Online J;22(12), 2016 Dec 15.
[Is] ISSN:1087-2108
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Gyrate erythema, which also is known as erythemaannulare centrifugum (EAC), is a reactive dermatitisthat is thought to occur in response to an underlyingtrigger. The superficial form is characterized bythe typical, centrifugally-expanding, annular,erythematous patches or plaques with a distincttrailing scale. The deep form also is a centrifugallyexpanding,erythematous plaque but with induratedborders and absence of scale. These cutaneousfindings are thought to be reactive, most often inresponse to infections or drugs and, less likely, tounderlying malignant conditions.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Erythema/diagnosis
Skin Diseases, Genetic/diagnosis
Tinea Pedis/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Abdomen
Back
Erythema/complications
Erythema/pathology
Humans
Male
Middle Aged
Skin Diseases, Genetic/complications
Skin Diseases, Genetic/pathology
Tinea Pedis/complications
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 171011
[Lr] Last revision date:171011
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170322
[St] Status:MEDLINE


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