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[PMID]: 29523897
[Au] Autor:Sino H; Zimmer B; Schelper I; Schenk-Kazan S; Streibelt F
[Ad] Address:Orthodontic Practice, Teichstr. 24, 34130, Kassel, Germany.
[Ti] Title:Koordination von Brackettorque und Schneidezahninklination : Teil 2: Reproduzierbarkeit und statistische Kennwerte des TCA ("torque coordination angle"). Coordinating bracket torque and incisor inclination : Part 2: Reproducibility and statistical measures of the torque coordination angle (TCA).
[So] Source:J Orofac Orthop;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1615-6714
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To determine the reproducibility and statistical measures of the torque coordination angle (TCA). METHODS: A total of 107 final cephalograms and corresponding casts were included, all reflecting treatment outcomes that met high qualitative standards, one of them being a Peer Assessment Rating (PAR) score of ≤3. Based on these records, the TCA was measured as a parameter to identify differences related to tooth morphology and bracket position between the torque-relevant reference plane at the bracket base and the long axis of a tooth. All measurements were performed on upper and lower central incisors (U1 and L1). RESULTS: Several reproducibility assessments for the TCA measurements yielded good results, including objectivity at 1.26 ± 0.81° (U1) or 1.41 ± 1.18° (L1), examiner reliability at 1.30 ± 0.97° (U1) or 1.25 ± 0.82° (L1), and method reliability at 1.80 ± 1.13° (U1) or 1.53 ± 1.07° (L1). The statistical measures revealed a high degree of interindividual variability. With bracket placement 4.5 mm (U1) or 4.0 mm (L1) above the incisal edge, the differences between the maximum and minimum TCA values were similarly large in both jaws (21.0° for U1 or 20.0° for L1), given mean TCA values of 24.6 ± 3.6° (U1) or 22.9 ± 4.3° (L1). Moving the bracket placement from 3.5 to 5.5 mm (U1) or from 3.0 to 5.0 mm (L1) changed the mean TCA values by 4.5° (U1) or 3.2° (L1). CONCLUSIONS: The TCA is a suitable cephalometric parameter to identify differences related to tooth morphology and bracket placement. Given its high interindividual variability, the fixed torque value of a specific bracket system should not be expected to produce the same incisor inclinations across patients.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00056-018-0130-8

  2 / 20301 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29523056
[Au] Autor:Trousset K; Phillips D; Karduna A
[Ad] Address:1 University of Oregon.
[Ti] Title:An Investigation Into Force Sense at the Shoulder.
[So] Source:Motor Control;:1-10, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1087-1640
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Proprioception is assessed more often through joint position sense and kinesthesia than force sense. The purpose of this study is to investigate force sense at the shoulder. A total of 12 subjects were recruited. An ipsilateral force reproduction protocol at the shoulder at 50°, 70°, and 90° and 120%, 140%, and 160% baseline torque. Dependent variables were constant error (CE) and root mean square error. An effect was found for load on absolute (p = .001) and normalized CE (p < .001). CE decreased with increased load. An effect for angle was found for absolute root mean square error (p = .002), more accurate at 50° (p = .01), but no effect when normalized (p = .19). With increased loads, subjects undershot the target and CE approached zero. Because of the differing behavior in CE and root mean square error, and absolute and normalized data, force sense studies should examine error from these perspectives.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1123/mc.2017-0067

  3 / 20301 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29425722
[Au] Autor:Vilos G; Vilos A; Jacob GP; Abu-Rafea B; Ternamian A
[Ad] Address:Fertility Clinic, London Health Sciences Centre, Western University, London, Ontario, Canada.
[Ti] Title:Safe Veress Needle Intraperitoneal Placement and Safer Laparoscopic Entry.
[So] Source:J Minim Invasive Gynecol;, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1553-4669
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:STUDY OBJECTIVE: Fifty percent of laparoscopic bowel and vascular injuries occur at the time of entry. These serious complications can lead to significant morbidity and even mortality. This video demonstrates 3 techniques that have been developed to minimize the risk of these injuries during entry. DESIGN: Step-by-step description of 3 techniques that can be used as a highly reliable and safe method of obtaining intraperitoneal entry during laparoscopy. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Caudal displacement of the umbilicus before insertion of the veress needle allows for a median displacement of 6 cm between the site of entry and the common iliac vessels. An entry pressure of less than 9 mm Hg is suggestive of successful intraperitoneal entry. The left upper quadrant should be used in specific cases instead of the umbilicus as the point of entry for the veress needle. The use of a visualized trocarless cannula instead of a conventional primary trocar for entry after insufflation allows for real-time recognition of injury and converts linear penetrating force to radial torque. CONCLUSION: These 3 techniques can help decrease the risk and improve intraoperative recognition of serious bowel and vascular injuries during laparoscopy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

  4 / 20301 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519888
[Au] Autor:Wu YK; Umeshima H; Kurisu J; Kengaku M
[Ad] Address:Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida Honmachi, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8501, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Nesprins and opposing microtubule motors generate a point force that drives directional nuclear motion in migrating neurons.
[So] Source:Development;145(5), 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1477-9129
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Nuclear migration of newly born neurons is essential for cortex formation in the brain. The nucleus is translocated by actin and microtubules, yet the actual force generated by the interplay of these cytoskeletons remains elusive. High-resolution time-lapse observation of migrating murine cerebellar granule cells revealed that the nucleus actively rotates along the direction of its translocation, independently of centrosome motion. Pharmacological and molecular perturbation indicated that spin torque is primarily generated by microtubule motors through the LINC complex in the absence of actomyosin contractility. In contrast to the prevailing view that microtubules are uniformly oriented around the nucleus, we observed that the perinuclear microtubule arrays are of mixed polarity and both cytoplasmic dynein complex and kinesin-1 are required for nuclear rotation. Kinesin-1 can exert a point force on the nuclear envelope via association with nesprins, and loss of kinesin-1 causes failure in neuronal migration Thus, microtubules steer the nucleus and drive its rotation and translocation via a dynamic, focal interaction of nesprins with kinesin-1 and dynein, and this is necessary for neuronal migration during brain development.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  5 / 20301 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519148
[Au] Autor:Karnovsky SC; Desandis B; Papson AK; O'Malley Q; DiGiacomo R; O'Malley MJ; Cabe TN; Drakos MC
[Ad] Address:1 Hospital for Special Surgery, New York, NY, USA.
[Ti] Title:Tibialis Anterior Reconstruction With Hamstring Autograft Using a Minimally Invasive Approach.
[So] Source:Foot Ankle Int;:1071100717750883, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:1944-7876
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Tibialis anterior tendon ruptures are rare and can cause significant dysfunction. Often, conservative measures are prescribed because of the morbidity of a tendon transfer as an operative solution. We present a novel reconstruction technique using hamstring autograft, which may obviate the need for local tendon transfer and long-term bracing. METHODS: Patients who underwent tibialis anterior reconstruction with hamstring autograft between 2011 and 2015 were screened for inclusion. Eight were included. Functional outcomes were assessed pre-and-postoperatively using the Foot and Ankle Outcome Score (FAOS), Visual Analog Pain Scale (VAS), and Short-Form-12 (SF-12) general health questionnaire. Isokinetic testing using a dynamometer (Biodex System 4 Pro) was performed at 60 and 120 degrees/s, respectively, for inversion/eversion and plantarflexion/dorsiflexion on both ankles at a minimum of 6 months postoperatively to determine peak torque, average power, and total work. Range of motion (ROM) testing was also performed, using a goniometer, at a minimum of 6 months postoperatively. Average follow-up was 17.3 (6.0-40.0) months for strength testing and ROM testing, and 18.5 (12.0-26.0) months for functional outcome scores. RESULTS: Average postoperative functional scores improved for all tests. ROM was similar between the uninvolved and involved ankles for inversion/eversion and plantarflexion/dorsiflexion. Patients showed deficits in dorsiflexion strength in all measures tested and improvements in inversion strength. All patients were able to ambulate without a brace. CONCLUSION: Use of a hamstring autograft for tibialis anterior reconstruction resulted in good clinical outcomes. This procedure successfully restored ankle ROM postoperatively and tendon strength in inversion and dorsiflexion, with most patients showing little deficit when comparing their involved and uninvolved sides. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level IV, Case series.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/1071100717750883

  6 / 20301 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518811
[Au] Autor:Biscoping S; Ruttmann E; Rehmann P; Wöstmann B
[Ti] Title:Do Sealing Materials Influence Superstructure Attachment in Implants?
[So] Source:Int J Prosthodont;31(2):163-165, 2018 Mar/Apr.
[Is] ISSN:0893-2174
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: This study aimed to evaluate the possible effect of sealing materials on superstructure attachment (ie, tightening/loosening torque and implant-abutment gap) in two different implant systems. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A silicone, a chlorhexidine gel, and an industrial lubricant were tested. A 3D microscope was used for assessment of the implant-abutment gap, and the abutment screw was tightened and loosened with a digital torque screwdriver. A total of 20 implants per test group (10 BEGO Semados RI and 10 Nobel Biocare Replace Select Straight) were evaluated. RESULTS: The tested sealing materials did not influence the gap between implant and abutment, but the force necessary for loosening the abutment screws decreased significantly. CONCLUSION: Sealing materials may be useful against bacteria, but probably influence torque negatively.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.11607/ijp.5530

  7 / 20301 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29507887
[Au] Autor:An H; Ohno T; Kanno Y; Kageyama Y; Monnai Y; Maki H; Shi J; Ando K
[Ad] Address:Department of Applied Physics and Physico-Informatics, Keio University, Yokohama 223-8522, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Current-induced magnetization switching using an electrically insulating spin-torque generator.
[So] Source:Sci Adv;4(2):eaar2250, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:2375-2548
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Current-induced magnetization switching through spin-orbit torques is the fundamental building block of spin-orbitronics, which promises high-performance, low-power memory and logic devices. The spin-orbit torques generally arise from spin-orbit coupling of heavy metals. However, even in a heterostructure where a metallic magnet is sandwiched by two different insulators, a nonzero spin-orbit torque is expected because of the broken inversion symmetry; an electrical insulator can be a source of the spin-orbit torques. We demonstrate current-induced magnetization switching using an insulator. We show that oxygen incorporation into the most widely used spintronic material, Pt, turns the heavy metal into an electrically insulating generator of the spin-orbit torques, which enables the electrical switching of perpendicular magnetization in a ferrimagnet sandwiched by insulating oxides. We also show that the spin-orbit torques generated from the Pt oxide can be controlled electrically through voltage-driven oxygen migration. These findings open a route toward energy-efficient, voltage-programmable spin-orbit devices based on insulating metal oxides.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1126/sciadv.aar2250

  8 / 20301 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29499712
[Au] Autor:Chen J; Lum PS
[Ad] Address:Department of Biomedical Engineering, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC, 20064, USA. ji.chen@nih.gov.
[Ti] Title:Pilot testing of the spring operated wearable enhancer for arm rehabilitation (SpringWear).
[So] Source:J Neuroeng Rehabil;15(1):13, 2018 Mar 02.
[Is] ISSN:1743-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Robotic devices for neurorehabilitation of movement impairments in persons with stroke have been studied extensively. However, the vast majority of these devices only allow practice of stereotyped components of simulated functional tasks in the clinic. Previously we developed SpringWear, a wearable, spring operated, upper extremity exoskeleton capable of assisting movements during real-life functional activities, potentially in the home. SpringWear assists shoulder flexion, elbow extension and forearm supination/pronation. The assistance profiles were designed to approximate the torque required to move the joint passively through its range. These three assisted DOF are combined with two passive shoulder DOF, allowing complex multi-joint movement patterns. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study to assess changes in movement patterns when assisted by SpringWear. Thirteen persons with chronic stroke performed range of motion (ROM) and functional tasks, including pick and place tasks with various objects. Sensors on the device measured rotation at all 5 DOF and a kinematic model calculated position of the wrist relative to the shoulder. Within subject t-tests were used to determine changes with assistance from SpringWear. RESULTS: Maximum shoulder flexion, elbow extension and forearm pronation/supination angles increased significantly during both ROM and functional tasks (p < 0.002). Elbow flexion/extension ROM also increased significantly (p < 0.001). When the subjects volitionally held up the arm against gravity, extension at the index finger proximal interphalangeal joint increased significantly (p = 0.033) when assisted by SpringWear. The forward reach workspace increased 19% (p = 0.002). Nine subjects could not complete the functional tasks unassisted and only one showed improvement on task completion with SpringWear. CONCLUSIONS: SpringWear increased the usable workspace during reaching movements, but there was no consistent improvement in the ability to complete functional tasks. Assistance levels at the shoulder were increased only until the shoulder could be voluntarily held at 90 degrees of flexion. A higher level of assistance may have yielded better results. Also combining SpringWear with HandSOME, an exoskeleton for assisting hand opening, may yield the most dramatic improvements in functional task performance. These low-cost devices can potentially reduce effort and improve performance during task practice, increasing adherence to home training programs for rehabilitation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12984-018-0352-4

  9 / 20301 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29464287
[Au] Autor:Di Leonardo B; Ludwig B; Lisson JA; Contardo L; Mura R; Hourfar J
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical, Surgical and Health Sciences, University of Trieste, Trieste, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Insertionsdrehmoment und Erfolgsrate paramedian inserierter kieferorthopädischer Mini-Implantate : Eine retrospektive Studie. Insertion torque values and success rates for paramedian insertion of orthodontic mini-implants : A retrospective study.
[So] Source:J Orofac Orthop;79(2):109-115, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1615-6714
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: Orthodontic mini-implants (OMIs) are a reliable method to provide temporary orthodontic anchorage. We hypothesized that there is an optimal insertion torque (<10 Ncm) that can be used to ensure the success of self-drilling OMIs in the paramedian region. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Included were 40 (26 females, 14 males) consecutive patients requiring palatal skeletal anchorage. Mean age was 17.3 years (range 11.0-44.6 years) for female patients and 15.7 years (range 10.6-36.9 years) for male patients. A total of 22 patients received a Beneslider according to Wilmes for the distalization of maxillary first molars, 10 patients received a Mesialslider for the mesialization of maxillary first molars, and 8 patients received a bone-borne rapid palatal expansion (RPE) appliance. Torque values of 10-15 Ncm were recorded in 46.3% of the OMIs and 15-20 Ncm in 35% of OMIs. OMIs that endured the orthodontic force applied for ≥6 months were considered as success. RESULTS: The overall success rate was 98.8%. No significant differences were found between insertion torque values with respect to the right and left sides, Jarabak's ratio, facial axis, and Frankfort to mandibular plane angle. There were no significant differences in the OMIs insertion torques with regard to the different appliances. No association was found between insertion torque and vertical skeletal morphology. CONCLUSION: With an overall success rate of 98.8%, the study hypothesis that greater insertion torque (>10 Ncm) will decrease the success rate and increase palatal OMI failure was rejected.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00056-018-0120-x

  10 / 20301 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29411127
[Au] Autor:Souron R; Nosaka K; Jubeau M
[Ad] Address:Laboratoire "Motricité, Interactions, Performance" (EA4334), Faculté des Sciences du Sport, Université de Nantes, 25 bis Boulevard Guy Mollet-BP 72206, 44 322, Nantes cedex 3, France.
[Ti] Title:Changes in central and peripheral neuromuscular fatigue indices after concentric versus eccentric contractions of the knee extensors.
[So] Source:Eur J Appl Physiol;118(4):805-816, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1439-6327
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To better understand neuromuscular characteristics of eccentric exercise-induced muscle damage, this study compared between concentric (CONC) and eccentric (ECC) exercises of knee extensor muscles, and the first (ECC1) and second bouts of the eccentric exercise (ECC2) for central and peripheral parameters associated with neuromuscular fatigue. METHODS: Twelve young men performed three exercise bouts separated by at least 1 week between CONC and ECC1, and 2 weeks between ECC1 and ECC2. In each exercise, maximal voluntary concentric or eccentric contractions of the knee extensors were performed until a reduction in maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVC) torque of at least 40% MVC was achieved immediately post-exercise. MVC torque, central (voluntary activation and normalised electromyographic activity), and peripheral neuromuscular indices (evoked torque and M-wave amplitude), and muscle soreness were assessed before (PRE), immediately after (POST), 1 h (1H), and 1-4 days after exercise (D1, D2, D3, and D4). RESULTS: MVC torque decreased at only POST for CONC (- 52.8%), but remained below the baseline at POST (- 48.6%), 1H (- 34.1%), and D1-D4 (- 34.1 to - 18.2%) after ECC1, and at POST (- 45.2%), 1H (- 24.4%) and D1 (- 13.4%) after ECC2 (p < 0.05). Voluntary activation decreased immediately after ECC1 (- 21.6%) and ECC2 (- 21.1%), but not after CONC. Electrically evoked torques decreased similarly at POST and 1H for the three conditions, but remained below the baseline at D1 only post-ECC1. CONCLUSION: These results showed that both central and peripheral factors contributed to the MVC decrease after ECC1 and ECC2, but the decrease was mainly due to peripheral factors after CONC.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00421-018-3816-0


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