Database : MEDLINE
Search on : trichotillomania [Words]
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[PMID]: 29515968
[Au] Autor:Isobe M; Redden SA; Keuthen NJ; Stein DJ; Lochner C; Grant JE; Chamberlain SR
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, University of Cambridge, UK.
[Ti] Title:Striatal abnormalities in trichotillomania: a multi-site MRI analysis.
[So] Source:Neuroimage Clin;17:893-898, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:2213-1582
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Trichotillomania (hair-pulling disorder) is characterized by the repetitive pulling out of one's own hair, and is classified as an Obsessive-Compulsive Related Disorder. Abnormalities of the ventral and dorsal striatum have been implicated in disease models of trichotillomania, based on translational research, but direct evidence is lacking. The aim of this study was to elucidate subcortical morphometric abnormalities, including localized curvature changes, in trichotillomania. De-identified MRI scans were pooled by contacting authors of previous peer-reviewed studies that examined brain structure in adult patients with trichotillomania, following an extensive literature search. Group differences on subcortical volumes of interest were explored (t-tests) and localized differences in subcortical structure morphology were quantified using permutation testing. The pooled sample comprised N=68 individuals with trichotillomania and N=41 healthy controls. Groups were well-matched in terms of age, gender, and educational levels. Significant volumetric reductions were found in trichotillomania patients versus controls in right amygdala and left putamen. Localized shape deformities were found in bilateral nucleus accumbens, bilateral amygdala, right caudate and right putamen. Structural abnormalities of subcortical regions involved in affect regulation, inhibitory control, and habit generation, play a key role in the pathophysiology of trichotillomania. Trichotillomania may constitute a useful model through which to better understand other compulsive symptoms. These findings may account for why certain medications appear effective for trichotillomania, namely those modulating subcortical dopamine and glutamatergic function. Future work should study the state versus trait nature of these changes, and the impact of treatment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1016/j.nicl.2017.12.031

  2 / 1220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28453238
[Au] Autor:Osman OT; Souid AK; Al-Mugaddam F; Eapen BR; Jafferany M
[Ad] Address:College of Medicine and Health Sciences, United Arab Emirates University, PO Box 17666, Alain, Abu Dhabi 00000, United Arab Emirates. ossamao@uaeu.ac.ae.
[Ti] Title:Attentiveness of Dermatologists in the Middle East to Psychocutaneous Medicine.
[So] Source:Prim Care Companion CNS Disord;19(2), 2017 Apr 27.
[Is] ISSN:2155-7780
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Objective: Patients with skin diseases often have psychological problems and complications that require assessment and treatment. The main objective of this study was to explore attentiveness of dermatologists to psychiatric symptoms in their patients. Methods: A previously validated online questionnaire was used to explore the attitude and experience of dermatologists practicing in the Middle East toward the assessment of the psychiatric needs of their patients. The survey also inquired about awareness of available resources in dealing with psychodermatology. This online survey was conducted between October 2011 and October 2012. Results: Of 70 invited dermatologists, 57 (81%) completed the survey. Fifteen respondents (31%) received no training and had attended no educational events on psychodermatology. Only 19 respondents (33%) were able to identify psychodermatology as psychiatric components of skin diseases and dermatologic symptoms of psychiatric disorders. Twenty respondents (41%) reported frequent experience with psychodermatology, and 14 (28%) were "very comfortable" in diagnosing and treating psychodermatology patients. Twenty-two respondents (47%) recognized psychocutaneous involvement in 10% to 25% of their patients, while 18 (36%) recognized it in < 10% of their patients. Recognized diagnoses that required referral for psychiatric assessment included trichotillomania (34%), delusion of parasitosis (22%), depression (18%), dysmorphophobias (16%), dermatitis (10%), and venereophobia (10%). Forty-five respondents (90%) were unaware of psychodermatology resources. The majority of respondents expressed interest in education on depression, anxiety, adjustment disorders, and body dysmorphic disorder. Conclusions: Psychocutaneous involvements are common among dermatologic patients. A large number of the surveyed dermatologists had no training or education in psychodermatology. A lack of familiarity with patient and family resources on psychocutaneous conditions was also evident. These findings support the need for improvement in training and education in psychodermatology.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Attention
Dermatologists/psychology
Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice
Mental Disorders/diagnosis
Skin Diseases/diagnosis
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Humans
Male
Mental Disorders/complications
Middle Aged
Middle East
Skin Diseases/complications
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4088/PCC.16m02080

  3 / 1220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29468679
[Au] Autor:Lichtblau KR; Romani PW; Greer BD; Fisher WW; Bragdon AK
[Ad] Address:University of Nebraska Medical Center's Munroe-Meyer Institute.
[Ti] Title:Remote treatment of sleep-related trichotillomania and trichophagia.
[So] Source:J Appl Behav Anal;, 2018 Feb 21.
[Is] ISSN:1938-3703
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:We used a biobehavioral treatment consisting of melatonin and a standardized bed and wake time to decrease one girl's head and mouth touches associated with sleep-related trichotillomania and trichophagia. We remotely coached the girl's caregiver to implement all procedures and monitored response to treatment using a DropCam Pro video camera equipped with night-vision capabilities. Head and mouth touches decreased, and her sleep pattern improved with the combination of treatment strategies. We discuss our use of a novel mode of service delivery to treat sleep-related problem behavior.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180222
[Lr] Last revision date:180222
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/jaba.442

  4 / 1220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29438853
[Au] Autor:Hennessy MM; Ivanovski I; Ó Súilleabháin CB
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Mercy University Hospital, Cork, Ireland. Electronic address: mhennessy@muh.ie.
[Ti] Title:Gastric ulceration and perforation secondary to large trichobezoar - A case report describing the role of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis.
[So] Source:Int J Surg Case Rep;43:25-28, 2018 Feb 10.
[Is] ISSN:2210-2612
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Trichotillomania and trichotillophagia can result in huge intraluminal coagulations of hair. Rarely, these can present with gastric perforation. This work has been reported in line with the SCARE criteria (Agha et al., 2016) [1]. PRESENTATION OF CASE: We report the case of a 15 year old girl who attended the emergency department with abdominal pain and vomiting. Ultrasound abdomen and pelvis identified free fluid within the pelvis concerning for inflammatory bowel disease. A subsequent magnetic resonance enterography (MRE) demonstrated a giant gastric trichobezoar which resulted in gastric perforation necessitating laparotomy and gastrotomy. The patient recovered well from the surgery and was reviewed by the psychiatry service prior to discharge. DISCUSSION: Trichobezoar is a challenging diagnosis and as clinician, we must always include it in our differential diagnosis. The clinical presentation, signs and symptoms depend on the size of the trichobezoar and the presence of complications. Management is almost always surgical. CONCLUSION: This case illustrates the infrequent perforation risk of gastric bezoars and the important role of magnetic resonance imaging in diagnosis, particularly in a population who must not be exposed to excessive radiation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180221
[Lr] Last revision date:180221
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 1220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29306818
[Au] Autor:Slikboer R; Castle DJ; Nedeljkovic M; Rossell SL
[Ad] Address:Centre for Mental Health, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne, Australia. Electronic address: rslikboer@swin.edu.au.
[Ti] Title:Types of avoidance in hair-pulling disorder (trichotillomania): An exploratory and confirmatory analysis.
[So] Source:Psychiatry Res;261:154-160, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7123
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Hair-pulling disorder (HPD) or Trichotillomania is a complex disorder with frequent relapses. Avoidance has been highlighted as an important behavioural feature in HPD. To improve our understanding of avoidance, two studies were conducted to identify the types of avoidance that may be experienced by those who pull hair. Internet questionnaires were used to collect data. Data from study one was split into two subsets. An exploratory factor analysis was conducted to identify the different types of avoidance experienced by those reporting symptoms of hair pulling (subset one, n = 278), followed by a confirmatory factor analysis (subset two, n = 295). In study two a MANOVA was conducted (n = 300) to examine whether levels of avoidance differed between controls and those with hair pulling symptoms. Participants with hair pulling symptoms had greater levels of avoidance on each of the five types: 'Avoidance of non-social goals', 'Self-concealment', 'Behavioural social avoidance', 'Avoidance of relationship problem solving' and 'Avoidance of thinking about the future'. These data expand on the current literature, which has predominantly focused on experiential avoidance. Future research will need to validate these findings in a clinical group.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180210
[Lr] Last revision date:180210
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 1220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29407564
[Au] Autor:Lee HJ; Espil FM; Bauer CC; Siwiec SG; Woods DW
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, WI, USA. Electronic address: leehj@uwm.edu.
[Ti] Title:Computerized response inhibition training for children with trichotillomania.
[So] Source:Psychiatry Res;262:20-27, 2018 Jan 05.
[Is] ISSN:1872-7123
[Cp] Country of publication:Ireland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Evidence suggests that trichotillomania is characterized by impairment in response inhibition, which is the ability to suppress pre-potent/dominant but inappropriate responses. This study sought to test the feasibility of computerized response inhibition training for children with trichotillomania. Twenty-two children were randomized to the 8-session response inhibition training (RIT; n = 12) or a waitlisted control (WLT; n = 10). Primary outcomes were assessed by an independent evaluator, using the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement (CGI-I), and the NIMH Trichotillomania Severity (NIMH-TSS) and Impairment scales (NIMH-TIS) at pre, post-training/waiting, and 1-month follow-up. Relative to the WLT group, the RIT group showed a higher response rate (55% vs. 11%) on the CGI-I and a lower level of impairment on the NIMH-TIS, at post-training. Overall symptom reductions rates on the NIMH-TSS were 34% (RIT) vs. 21% (WLT) at post-training. The RIT's therapeutic gains were maintained at 1-month follow-up, as indicated by the CGI-I responder status (= 66%), and a continuing reduction in symptom on the NIMH-TSS. This pattern of findings was also replicated by the 6 waitlisted children who received the same RIT intervention after post-waiting assessment. Results suggest that computerized RIT may be a potentially useful intervention for trichotillomania.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:Publisher

  7 / 1220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29407358
[Au] Autor:Houghton DC; Alexander JR; Bauer CC; Woods DW
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychology, Texas A&M University, 4235 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843-4235, United States. Electronic address: davidhoughton@tamu.edu.
[Ti] Title:Abnormal perceptual sensitivity in body-focused repetitive behaviors.
[So] Source:Compr Psychiatry;82:45-52, 2017 Dec 27.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8384
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Several compulsive grooming habits such as hair pulling, skin picking, and nail biting are collectively known as body-focused repetitive behaviors (BFRBs). Although subclinical BFRBs are common and benign, more severe and damaging manifestations exist that are difficult to manage. Researchers have suggested that BFRBs are maintained by various cognitive, affective, and sensory contingencies. Although the involvement of cognitive and affective processes in BFRBs has been studied, there is a paucity of research on sensory processes. METHODS: The current study tested whether adults with subclinical or clinical BFRBs would report abnormal patterns of sensory processing as compared to a healthy control sample. RESULTS: Adults with clinical BFRBs (n = 26) reported increased sensory sensitivity as compared to persons with subclinical BFRBs (n = 48) and healthy individuals (n = 33). Elevations in sensation avoidance differentiated persons with clinical versus subclinical BFRBs. Sensation seeking patterns were not different between groups. Unexpectedly, BFRB severity was associated with lower registration of sensory stimuli, but this finding may be due to high psychiatric comorbidity rates in the BFRB groups. CONCLUSIONS: These findings suggest that several sensory abnormalities may underlie BFRBs. Implications for the etiology and treatment of BFRBs are discussed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180206
[Lr] Last revision date:180206
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 1220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29263543
[Au] Autor:Malakar S; Mehta PR
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Rita Skin Foundation, Kolkata, West Bengal, India.
[Ti] Title:"i hair": A prognostic marker in alopecia areata & trichotillomania.
[So] Source:Indian J Dermatol;62(6):658-660, 2017 Nov-Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1998-3611
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Trichoscopy as an investigative tool is revolutionizing the diagnosis of hair disorders. The use of a trichoscope has unveiled a plethora of signs which not only helps in decoding the underlying tricoscopic condition but also acts as prognostic markers. Herein, we present a new trichoscopic sign, "i hair" in alopecia areata and trichotillomania. "i hair" are short hairs with an accentuated distal end. There may be a thin hypopigmented shaft just beneath the darker distal end, thus making them resemble the alphabet "i."
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171224
[Lr] Last revision date:171224
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4103/ijd.IJD_337_17

  9 / 1220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29257789
[Au] Autor:Argüz Çildir D; Kalyoncu T
[Ad] Address:Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Tepecik Teaching and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey deniz.argz@yahoo.comDepartment of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Tepecik Teaching and Research Hospital, Izmir, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:Trichotillomania Associated With Aripiprazole: A Case Report.
[So] Source:J Clin Psychopharmacol;38(1):98-99, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1533-712X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171219
[Lr] Last revision date:171219
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/JCP.0000000000000821

  10 / 1220 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29187921
[Au] Autor:Hamid M; Chaoui Y; Mountasser M; Sabbah F; Raiss M; Hrora A; Alaoui M; Ahallat M; Chaouch S; Ouazzani H
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery C, Hôpital Ibn-Sina, Rabat, Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie Rabat, Mohammed V University Souissi, Rabat, Morocco.
[Ti] Title:Giant gastric trichobezoar in a young female with Rapunzel syndrome: case report.
[So] Source:Pan Afr Med J;27:252, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1937-8688
[Cp] Country of publication:Uganda
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Rapunzel syndrome is an extremely rare complication of a gastric trichobezoar in. We report here the unusual case of a case of a 16 years old girl presented with severe abdominal pain and vomiting. Clinical examination revealed a malnourished girl, with presence of a mobile and sensitive abdominal mass of 20x15 cm witch filled the upper quadrant. An abdominal computed tomography scan showed a heterogeneous mass occupying the whole stomach cavity with extension into the third portion of the duodenum. A diagnostic of giant trichobezoar is suspected after further questioning reveling a trichotillomania, trichophagia and onychophagia. The removal of the trichobezoar endoscopically failed and it was possible to pull only few fibers of hair to comfort the diagnostic. She was subjected to an exploratory laparotomy. An antral gastrostomy were performed and a 25x10x7 cm trichobezoar was extracted. The patient had an uneventful postoperative outcome and was derived to psychiatry. Rapunzel syndrome is an uncommon trichobezoar, it's commonly found in young females usually with an underlying psychiatric disorder. Management requires gastrotomy. A psychiatric assessment and a long-term follow-up are advocated as a regular part of treatment to prevent recurrence.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Abdominal Pain/etiology
Bezoars/diagnosis
Trichotillomania/complications
Vomiting/etiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Bezoars/pathology
Bezoars/surgery
Endoscopy/methods
Female
Gastrostomy/methods
Hair
Humans
Laparotomy/methods
Malnutrition
Stomach
Tomography, X-Ray Computed
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171219
[Lr] Last revision date:171219
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171201
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.11604/pamj.2017.27.252.9110


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