Database : MEDLINE
Search on : trigeminal and neuralgia [Words]
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[PMID]: 29520796
[Au] Autor:Du Q; Zhang C; Zhu X; Liang X; Zhang C; Verma V; Follet K; Wang S; Fan Q; Ma R; Zhou S; Zheng D
[Ad] Address:School of Biological Sciences, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Lincoln, NE, USA.
[Ti] Title:Application of statistical and computational methodology to predict brainstem dosimetry for trigeminal neuralgia stereotactic radiosurgery.
[So] Source:Med Phys;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:2473-4209
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To apply advanced statistical and computational methodology in evaluating the impact of anatomical and technical variables on normal tissue dosimetry of trigeminal neuralgia (TN) stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS). METHODS: Forty patients treated with LINAC-based TN SRS with 90 Gy maximum dose were randomly selected for the study. Parameters extracted from the treatment plans for the study included three dosimetric output variables: the maximum dose to the brainstem (BSmax), the volume of brainstem that received at least 10 Gy (V10BS), and the volume of normal brain that received at least 12 Gy (V12). We analyzed five anatomical variables: the incidence angle of the nerve with the brainstem surface (A), the nerve length (L), the nerve width as measured both axially (WA) and sagittally (WS), the distance measured along the nerve between the isocenter and the brainstem surface (D), and one technical variable: the utilized cone size (CS). Univariate correlation was calculated for each pair among all parameters. Multivariate regression models were fitted for the output parameters using the optimal input parameters selected by the Gaussian graphic model LASSO. Repeated 2-fold cross validations were used to evaluate the models. RESULTS: Median BSmax, V10BS, and V12 for the 40 patients were 35.7 Gy, 0.14 cc, and 1.28 cc, respectively. Median A, L, WA, WS, D, and CS were 43.7 , 8.8 mm, 2.8 mm, 2.7 mm, 4.8 mm, and 6 mm, respectively. Of the three output variables, BSmax most strongly correlated with the input variables. Specifically, it had strong, negative correlations with the input anatomical variables and a positive correlation with CS. The correlation between D and BSmax at -0.51 was the strongest correlation between single input and output parameters, followed by that between CS and V10BS at 0.45, and that between A and BSmax at -0.44. V12 was most correlated with cone size alone, rather than anatomy. LASSO identified an optimal 3-feature combination of A, D, and CS for BSmax and V10BS prediction. Using cross-validation, the multivariate regression models with the three selected features yielded stronger correlations than the correlation between the BSmax and V10BS themselves. CONCLUSIONS: For the first time, an advanced statistical and computational methodology was applied to study the impact of anatomical and technical variables on TN SRS. The variables were found to impact brainstem doses, and reasonably strong correlation models were established using an optimized 3-feature combination including the nerve incidence angle, cone size, and isocenter-brainstem distance. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/mp.12852

  2 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518229
[Au] Autor:Shutran M; Mosbach D; Tataryn Z; Arkun K; Wu JK
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Tufts Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts.
[Ti] Title:Case Report: Metastasis of a Trigeminal Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor to the Corpus Callosum.
[So] Source:Neurosurgery;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4040
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND IMPORTANCE: Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are relatively rare tumors of peripheral nerves that are notable for their locally aggressive nature, ability to metastasize, poor prognosis, and association with Neurofibromatosis type I. We present the case of a patient with a trigeminal nerve MPNST who developed an unusual metastasis to the corpus callosum, in the absence of any other central nervous system or systemic metastatic disease. We review the pathology and presentation of MPNST. CLINICAL PRESENTATION: A 53-yr-old woman presented with a 1-yr history of paroxysmal facial pain and dysesthesias in the right V1 and V2 distributions of the trigeminal nerve. She was initially diagnosed with trigeminal neuralgia although further imaging showed a cavernous sinus mass extending along the trigeminal nerve. She later developed an isolated lesion in the corpus callosum that was biopsied and consistent with MPNST. CONCLUSION: This case reviews the pathology and aggressive nature of MPNST and demonstrates an unusual site of metastasis. Clinicians should remain aware that MPNST can metastasize to sites in the central nervous system as well as systemically. Furthermore, clinicians should have a high index of suspicion for secondary causes of trigeminal neuralgia in cases with atypical features.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/neuros/nyy016

  3 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29400038
[Au] Autor:Podeur P; Okhremchuk I; Morvan JB; Vatin L; Rivière D; de Faria A; Joubert C; Dagain A
[Ti] Title:[Multiple intracranial epidermoid cysts: Case report].
[So] Source:Rev Laryngol Otol Rhinol (Bord);136(4):159-62, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:0035-1334
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Epidermoid cyst is a benign and rare tumor, that evolves slowly. We describe the case of a 55 years-old woman, who came to our consultation for atypical trigeminal neuralgia of left V1 and V2 nerves. Brain MRI found two tumors: T1W hypointense with no appreciable enhancement after gadolinium injection and T2W and diffusion hyperintense. This last feature was in favour of an epidermoid cyst, but the multiplicity of cerebral lesions was definitely not in favor of such a diagnos­tic. They were located behind the right eye and in the left Meckel's cave (trigeminal cave). The surgical strategy consis­ted in removal the retro orbital tumor witch was the most acces­si­ble of both the diagnostic of epidermoid cyst was retaned thanks to the anatomopathology report. As these lesions had the exact same characteristics, we concluded that they were simi­lar. The second epidermoid cyst was not removed because of surgical risk, its benign nature and low evolutionary potential.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Brain Diseases/diagnostic imaging
Cranial Fossa, Posterior/diagnostic imaging
Epidermal Cyst/diagnostic imaging
Orbital Diseases/diagnostic imaging
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Brain Diseases/pathology
Cranial Fossa, Posterior/pathology
Epidermal Cyst/pathology
Epidermal Cyst/surgery
Female
Humans
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Middle Aged
Orbital Diseases/pathology
Orbital Diseases/surgery
Trigeminal Neuralgia/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180206
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29425330
[Au] Autor:Jani RH; Hughes MA; Gold MS; Branstetter BF; Ligus ZE; Sekula RF
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurological Surgery, University of Pittsburgh School of Med-icine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
[Ti] Title:Trigeminal Nerve Compression Without Trigeminal Neuralgia: Intraoperative vs Imaging Evidence.
[So] Source:Neurosurgery;, 2018 Feb 06.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4040
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: While high-resolution imaging is increasingly used in guiding decisions about surgical interventions for the treatment of trigeminal neuralgia, direct assessment of the extent of vascular contact of the trigeminal nerve is still considered the gold standard for the determination of whether nerve decompression is warranted. OBJECTIVE: To compare intraoperative and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings of the prevalence and severity of vascular compression of the trigeminal nerve in patients without classical trigeminal neuralgia. METHODS: We prospectively recruited 27 patients without facial pain who were undergoing microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm and had undergone high-resolution preoperative MRI. Neurovascular contact/compression (NVC/C) by artery or vein was assessed both intraoperatively and by MRI, and was stratified into 3 types: simple contact, compression (indentation of the surface of the nerve), and deformity (deviation or distortion of the nerve). RESULTS: Intraoperative evidence of NVC/C was detected in 23 patients. MRI evidence of NVC/C was detected in 18 patients, all of whom had intraoperative evidence of NVC/C. Thus, there were 5, or 28% more patients in whom NVC/C was detected intraoperatively than with MRI (Kappa = 0.52); contact was observed in 4 of these patients and compression in 1 patient. In patients where NVC/C was observed by both methods, there was agreement regarding the severity of contact/compression in 83% (15/18) of patients (Kappa = 0.47). No patients exhibited deformity of the nerve by imaging or intraoperatively. CONCLUSION: There was moderate agreement between imaging and operative findings with respect to both the presence and severity of NVC/C.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/neuros/nyx636

  5 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29351686
[Au] Autor:Singh H; da Silva HB; Zeinalizadeh M; Elarjani T; Straus D; Sekhar LN
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
[Ti] Title:Basilar Artery Ectasia Causing Trigeminal Neuralgia: An Evolved Technique of Transpositional Suture-Pexy.
[So] Source:Oper Neurosurg (Hagerstown);14(2):194-199, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:2332-4260
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Microvascular decompression for patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TGN) is widely accepted as one of the modalities of treatment. The standard approach has been retrosigmoid suboccipital craniotomy with placement of a Teflon pledget to cushion the trigeminal nerve from the offending artery, or cauterize and divide the offending vein(s). However, in cases of severe compression caused by a large artery, the standard decompression technique may not be effective. OBJECTIVE: To describe a unique technique of vasculopexy of the ectatic basilar artery to the tentorium in a patient with TGN attributed to a severely ectatic and tortuous basilar artery. A case series of patients who underwent this technique of vasculopexy for arterial compression is presented. METHODS: The patient underwent a subtemporal transtentorial approach and the basilar artery was mobilized away from the trigeminal nerve. A suture was then passed through the wall of the basilar artery (tunica media) and secured to the tentorial edge, to keep the artery away from the nerve. RESULTS: The neuralgia was promptly relieved after the operation, with no complications. A postoperative magnetic resonance imaging scan showed the basilar artery to be away from the trigeminal root. In a series of 7 patients who underwent this technique of vasculopexy, no arterial complications were noted at short- or long-term follow-up. CONCLUSION: Repositioning and vasculopexy of an ectatic basilar artery for the treatment of TGN is safe and effective. This technique can also be used for other neuropathies that result from direct arterial compression.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/ons/opx087

  6 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29309632
[Au] Autor:Hadjipanayis CG; Carlson ML; Link MJ; Rayan TA; Parish J; Atkins T; Asher AL; Dunn IF; Corrales CE; Van Gompel JJ; Sughrue M; Olson JJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Mount Sinai Beth Israel, Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, New York, New York.
[Ti] Title:Congress of Neurological Surgeons Systematic Review and Evidence-Based Guidelines on Surgical Resection for the Treatment of Patients With Vestibular Schwannomas.
[So] Source:Neurosurgery;82(2):E40-E43, 2018 Feb 01.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4040
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:QUESTION 1: What surgical approaches for vestibular schwannomas (VS) are best for complete resection and facial nerve (FN) preservation when serviceable hearing is present? RECOMMENDATION: There is insufficient evidence to support the superiority of either the middle fossa (MF) or the retrosigmoid (RS) approach for complete VS resection and FN preservation when serviceable hearing is present. QUESTION 2: Which surgical approach (RS or translabyrinthine [TL]) for VS is best for complete resection and FN preservation when serviceable hearing is not present? RECOMMENDATION: There is insufficient evidence to support the superiority of either the RS or the TL approach for complete VS resection and FN preservation when serviceable hearing is not present. QUESTION 3: Does VS size matter for facial and vestibulocochlear nerve preservation with surgical resection? RECOMMENDATION: Level 3: Patients with larger VS tumor size should be counseled about the greater than average risk of loss of serviceable hearing. QUESTION 4: Should small intracanalicular tumors (<1.5 cm) be surgically resected? RECOMMENDATION: There are insufficient data to support a firm recommendation that surgery be the primary treatment for this subclass of VSs. QUESTION 5: Is hearing preservation routinely possible with VS surgical resection when serviceable hearing is present? RECOMMENDATION: Level 3: Hearing preservation surgery via the MF or the RS approach may be attempted in patients with small tumor size (<1.5 cm) and good preoperative hearing. QUESTION 6: When should surgical resection be the initial treatment in patients with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2)? RECOMMENDATION: There is insufficient evidence that surgical resection should be the initial treatment in patients with NF2. QUESTION 7: Does a multidisciplinary team, consisting of neurosurgery and neurotology, provides the best outcomes of complete resection and facial/vestibulocochlear nerve preservation for patients undergoing resection of VSs? RECOMMENDATION: There is insufficient evidence to support stating that a multidisciplinary team, usually consisting of a neurosurgeon and a neurotologist, provides superior outcomes compared to either subspecialist working alone. QUESTION 8: Does a subtotal surgical resection of a VS followed by stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to the residual tumor provide comparable hearing and FN preservation to patients who undergo a complete surgical resection? RECOMMENDATION: There is insufficient evidence to support subtotal resection (STR) followed by SRS provides comparable hearing and FN preservation to patients who undergo a complete surgical resection. QUESTION 9: Does surgical resection of VS treat preoperative balance problems more effectively than SRS? RECOMMENDATION: There is insufficient evidence to support either surgical resection or SRS for treatment of preoperative balance problems. QUESTION 10: Does surgical resection of VS treat preoperative trigeminal neuralgia more effectively than SRS? RECOMMENDATION: Level 3: Surgical resection of VSs may be used to better relieve symptoms of trigeminal neuralgia than SRS. QUESTION 11: Is surgical resection of VSs more difficult (associated with higher facial neuropathies and STR rates) after initial treatment with SRS? RECOMMENDATION: Level 3: If microsurgical resection is necessary after SRS, it is recommended that patients be counseled that there is an increased likelihood of a STR and decreased FN function. The full guideline can be found at: https://www.cns.org/guidelines/guidelines-management-patients-vestibular-schwannoma/chapter_8.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/neuros/nyx512

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[PMID]: 29294132
[Au] Autor:Romanelli P; Conti A; Bianchi L; Bergantin A; Martinotti A; Beltramo G
[Ad] Address:Centro Diagnostico Italiano, Milan, Italy.
[Ti] Title:Image-Guided Robotic Radiosurgery for Trigeminal Neuralgia.
[So] Source:Neurosurgery;, 2017 Dec 23.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4040
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Frameless, non-isocentric irradiation of an extended segment of the trigeminal nerve introduces new concepts in stereotactic radiosurgery for medically resistant trigeminal neuralgia (TN). OBJECTIVE: To report the results of the largest single-center experience about image-guided robotic radiosurgery for TN. METHODS: A cohort of 138 patients treated with CyberKnife® (Accuray Incorporated, Sunnyvale, California) radiosurgery with a minimum follow-up of 36 mo were recruited. Pain relief, medications, sensory disturbances, rate and time of pain recurrence were prospectively analyzed. RESULTS: Median follow-up was 52.4 mo; median dose 75 Gy; median target length 5.7-mm; median target volume 40 mm³; median prescription dose 60 Gy (80% isodose line). Actuarial pain control rate (Barrow Neurological Institute [BNI] class I-IIIa) at 6, 12, 24, and 36 mo were 93.5%, 85.8%, 79.7%, and 76%, respectively. Overall, 33 patients (24%) required a second treatment. Overall, 18.1% developed sensory disturbances after 16.4 ± 8.7 mo. One patient (0.7%) developed BNI grade IV dysfunction; 6 (4.3%) developed BNI grade III (somewhat bothersome) hypoesthesia after retreatment; BNI grade II (not bothersome) hypoesthesia was reported by 18 patients (11 after retreatment). Shorter nerve length (<6 mm vs 6 mm), smaller nerve volume (<30 mm3 vs >30 mm3), and lower prescription dose (<58 vs >58 Gy) were associated with treatment failure (P = .01, P = .02, P = .03, respectively). Re-irradiation independently predicted sensory disturbance (P < .001). CONCLUSION: Targeting a 6-mm segment of the trigeminal nerve with a prescribed dose of 60 Gy appears safe and effective. Persistent pain control was achieved in most patients with acceptable risk of sensory complications, which were typically found after re-irradiation.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/neuros/nyx571

  8 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29510278
[Au] Autor:Wu M; Fu X; Ji Y; Ding W; Deng D; Wang Y; Jiang X; Niu C
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of University of Science and Technology, Hefei, Anhui, China; Anhui provincial stereotactic neurological institute, Hefei, Anhui, China; Anhui provincial Key Laboratory of Brain Function and Disease, Hefei, Anhui, China.
[Ti] Title:Microvascular decompression for classical trigeminal neuralgia caused by venous compression: novel anatomical classifications and surgical strategy.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Microvascular decompression (MVD) of the trigeminal nerve is the most effective treatment for trigeminal neuralgia (TN). However, when encountering with classical trigeminal neuralgia caused by venous compression, the procedure becomes much more difficult, and failure or recurrence due to incomplete decompression may become frequent. This study aimed to investigate the anatomical variation of the culprit veins, and discuss the surgical strategy for different types respectively. METHODS: We performed a retrospective analysis of consecutive 64 cases in whom veins were considered as responsible vessels alone or combined with other adjacent arteries. The study classified culprit veins according to operative anatomy, designed personalized approach and decompression management according to different forms of compressive veins. Curative effect were assessed by Barrow Neurological Institute (BNI) pain intensity score and BNI facial numbness score. RESULTS: The most commonly encountered veins were the superior petrosal venous complex (SPVC), which were artificially divided into four types according to both venous tributary distribution and empty point site. We synthetically considered these factors and selected approach to expose the trigeminal root entre zoon (TREZ) between suprafloccular transhorizontal-fissure approach (STA) and infratentorial supracerebellar approach (ISA). The methods of decompression consist of interposing and transposing by using Teflon, and with aid of medical adhesive sometimes. Nerve combing (NC) of trigeminal root (TR) was conducted in situation of extremely difficulty NVC, instead of sacrificing veins. Pain was completely disappeared in 51 patients, the 'excellent' rate was 79.7%. There were 13 patients with pain relief were treated with re-operation. Postoperative complications included: 10 cases of facial numbness, 1 case of intracranial infection, 1 case in high-frequency hearing loss. CONCLUSION: The accuracy recognition of anatomical variation of SPVC is crucial for the management of classical trigeminal neuralgia caused by venous compression. Selecting appropriate approach and utilizing reasonable decompression methods can bring complete postoperative pain relieve for most of those cases. NC can be an alternative choice for extremely difficult cases, but would lead to facial numbness more frequently.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29294398
[Au] Autor:Zakrzewska JM; Wu J; Brathwaite TS
[Ad] Address:Facial Pain Unit, Eastman Dental Hospital, UCLH NHS Foundation Trust, London, United Kingdom. Electronic address: j.zakrzewska@ucl.ac.uk.
[Ti] Title:A Systematic Review of the Management of Trigeminal Neuralgia in Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;111:291-306, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Patients with trigeminal neuralgia (TN) and multiple sclerosis (MS) are often treated with medications or a surgical procedure. However, there is little evidence that such treatments result in 50% pain reduction and improvement in quality of life. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of treatments in patients with MS and trigeminal neuralgia. METHODS: We searched Medline, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Collaboration database from inception until October 2016. Two authors independently selected studies for inclusions, data extraction, and bias assessment. RESULTS: All studies were of low quality using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. For medical management, 10 studies were included, of which one was a randomized controlled trial. Two studies were on the use of misopropol, unique to patients with MS. For surgical therapy, 26 studies with at least 10 patients and a minimum of 2 years follow-up were included. All types of surgical procedures are reported and the results are poorer for TN with MS, with 50% having a recurrence by 2 years. The main complication was sensory loss. Many patients had to undergo further procedures to become pain free and there were no agreed prognostic factors. CONCLUSIONS: There was insufficient evidence to support any 1 medical therapy and so earlier surgery may be preferable. A patient with TN and MS has therefore to make a decision based on low-level evidence, beginning with standard drug therapy and then choosing a surgical procedure.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  10 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29288851
[Au] Autor:Fukuoka T; Nishimura Y; Hara M; Nomura K; Ryu H; Yoshikawa S; Wakabayashi T
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurosurgery, Nagoya University, Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Flat Posterior Cranial Fossa Affects Outcomes of Microvascular Decompression for Trigeminal Neuralgia.
[So] Source:World Neurosurg;111:e519-e526, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1878-8769
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prognostic factors for microvascular decompression (MVD) in patients with primary trigeminal neuralgia (TN), with a particular focus on the morphology of the posterior cranial fossa (PCF). METHODS: The present study investigated 126 surgically treated patients with primary TN with more than 1-year follow-up who underwent high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging between April 2003 and September 2015. We retrospectively reviewed clinical information and operative findings. Outcomes of MVD were also evaluated and patients were classified into "success" and "failure" groups. Furthermore, length, width, and height of the PCF were measured by approximation to an ellipsoid with reference to the anterior commissure-posterior commissure line. These values were compared between groups. RESULTS: Atypical type 2 TN (P < 0.001) and weak neurovascular compression (P < 0.001) correlated significantly with poor outcomes of MVD for primary TN. In terms of PCF morphology, the failure group showed a flatter PCF than the success group, whereas sex, age, affected side, topography of facial pain, interval between onset and surgery, responsible vessel, location of compression along the nerve, and site of compression around the circumference of the nerve root did not significantly affect outcomes of MVD for primary TN. CONCLUSIONS: The present study identified type 2 TN, weak neurovascular compression, and flatness of the PCF as predictors of poor prognosis after MVD for primary TN.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180303
[Lr] Last revision date:180303
[St] Status:In-Data-Review


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