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[PMID]: 29499642
[Au] Autor:Retchless AC; Kretz CB; Chang HY; Bazan JA; Abrams AJ; Norris Turner A; Jenkins LT; Trees DL; Tzeng YL; Stephens DS; MacNeil JR; Wang X
[Ad] Address:Division of Bacterial Diseases, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, GA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Expansion of a urethritis-associated Neisseria meningitidis clade in the United States with concurrent acquisition of N. gonorrhoeae alleles.
[So] Source:BMC Genomics;19(1):176, 2018 03 02.
[Is] ISSN:1471-2164
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Increased reports of Neisseria meningitidis urethritis in multiple U.S. cities during 2015 have been attributed to the emergence of a novel clade of nongroupable N. meningitidis within the ST-11 clonal complex, the "U.S. NmNG urethritis clade". Genetic recombination with N. gonorrhoeae has been proposed to enable efficient sexual transmission by this clade. To understand the evolutionary origin and diversification of the U.S. NmNG urethritis clade, whole-genome phylogenetic analysis was performed to identify its members among the N. meningitidis strain collection from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, including 209 urogenital and rectal N. meningitidis isolates submitted by U.S. public health departments in eleven states starting in 2015. RESULTS: The earliest representatives of the U.S. NmNG urethritis clade were identified from cases of invasive disease that occurred in 2013. Among 209 urogenital and rectal isolates submitted from January 2015 to September 2016, the clade accounted for 189/198 male urogenital isolates, 3/4 female urogenital isolates, and 1/7 rectal isolates. In total, members of the clade were isolated in thirteen states between 2013 and 2016, which evolved from a common ancestor that likely existed during 2011. The ancestor contained N. gonorrhoeae-like alleles in three regions of its genome, two of which may facilitate nitrite-dependent anaerobic growth during colonization of urogenital sites. Additional gonococcal-like alleles were acquired as the clade diversified. Notably, one isolate contained a sequence associated with azithromycin resistance in N. gonorrhoeae, but no other gonococcal antimicrobial resistance determinants were detected. CONCLUSIONS: Interspecies genetic recombination contributed to the early evolution and subsequent diversification of the U.S. NmNG urethritis clade. Ongoing acquisition of N. gonorrhoeae alleles by the U.S. NmNG urethritis clade may facilitate the expansion of its ecological niche while also increasing the frequency with which it causes urethritis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12864-018-4560-x

  2 / 5136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29512951
[Au] Autor:Dumusc A; Hügle T
[Ad] Address:Service de rhumatologie, Département de l'appareil locomoteur, CHUV, 1011 Lausanne.
[Ti] Title:Arthrite réactionnelle. [Reactive arthritis].
[So] Source:Rev Med Suisse;14(597):534-537, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1660-9379
[Cp] Country of publication:Switzerland
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:Reactive arthritis is usually regarded as a form of spondylarthritis. Patients generally present with an acute asymmetrical oligoarthritis following an episode of diarrhea or urethritis. The most frequent involved pathogens are Salmonella, Shigella, Campylobacter and Chlamydia trachomatis. Additional causative pathogens have been described. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs are the first line treatment for reactive arthritis, associated with physiotherapy. Occasionally, a short course of glucocorticoids or an intra-articular injection is needed. Chlamydia induced reactive arthritis should be treated with antibiotics. Some patients experience chronic persistent arthritis. These patients could benefit from a treatment with DMARDs such as sulfasalazine. In refractory cases, TNF-inhibitors are sometimes used.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  3 / 5136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29512421
[Au] Autor:Ballout RA; Maatouk I
[Ad] Address:1 66978 Faculty of Medicine, American University of Beirut , Beirut, Lebanon.
[Ti] Title:Isotretinoin-induced urethritis versus non-gonococcal urethritis in a man who has sex with men: an open debate.
[So] Source:Int J STD AIDS;:956462418761261, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1758-1052
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:This is the case of a young man presenting with urethritis despite a negative infectious work-up. Careful history taking elucidated a strong correlation between symptom onset and a recent dose escalation of isotretinoin for treatment of his refractory cystic acne. The urethral symptoms quickly resolved with dose reduction, suggesting urethritis as a rare adverse reaction of isotretinoin.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/0956462418761261

  4 / 5136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29511067
[Au] Autor:Clifton S; Town K; Furegato M; Cole M; Mohammed H; Woodhall SC; Kevin Dunbar J; Fifer H; Hughes G
[Ad] Address:Centre for Population Research in Sexual Health and HIV, Institute for Global Health, University College London, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Is previous azithromycin treatment associated with azithromycin resistance in ? A cross-sectional study using national surveillance data in England.
[So] Source:Sex Transm Infect;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1472-3263
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: It has been suggested that treatment of STIs with azithromycin may facilitate development of azithromycin resistance in (NG) by exposing the organism to suboptimal doses. We investigated whether treatment history for non-rectal (CT), non-gonococcal urethritis (NGU) or NG (proxies for azithromycin exposure) in sexual health (GUM) services was associated with susceptibility of NG to azithromycin. METHODS: Azithromycin susceptibility data from the Gonococcal Resistance to Antimicrobials Surveillance Programme (GRASP 2013-2015, n=4606) and additional high-level azithromycin-resistant isolates (HL-AziR) identified by the Public Health England reference laboratory (2013-2016, n=54) were matched to electronic patient records in the national GUMCAD STI surveillance dataset (2012-2016). Descriptive and regression analyses were conducted to examine associations between history of previous CT/NGU/NG and subsequent susceptibility of NG to azithromycin. RESULTS: Modal azithromycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was 0.25 mg/L (one dilution below the resistance breakpoint) in those with and without history of previous CT/NGU/NG (previous 1 month/6 months). There were no differences in MIC distribution by history of CT/NGU (P=0.98) or NG (P=0.85) in the previous 1 month/6 months or in the odds of having an elevated azithromycin MIC (>0.25 mg/L) (Adjusted OR for CT/NGU 0.97 (95% CI 0.76 to 1.25); adjusted OR for NG 0.82 (95% CI: 0.65 to 1.04)) compared with those with no CT/NGU/NG in the previous 6 months. Among patients with HL-AziR NG, 3 (4%) were treated for CT/NGU and 2 (3%) for NG in the previous 6 months, compared with 6% and 8%, respectively for all GRASP patients. CONCLUSIONS: We found no evidence of an association between previous treatment for CT/NGU or NG in GUM services and subsequent presentation with an azithromycin-resistant strain. As many CT diagnoses occur in non-GUM settings, further research is needed to determine whether azithromycin-resistant NG is associated with azithromycin exposure in other settings and for other conditions.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 5136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28468648
[Au] Autor:Clark JL; Segura ER; Oldenburg CE; Rios J; Montano SM; Perez-Brumer A; Villaran M; Sanchez J; Coates TJ; Lama JR
[Ad] Address:David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles, CA, USA. jlclark@mednet.ucla.edu.
[Ti] Title:Expedited Partner Therapy (EPT) increases the frequency of partner notification among MSM in Lima, Peru: a pilot randomized controlled trial.
[So] Source:BMC Med;15(1):94, 2017 05 04.
[Is] ISSN:1741-7015
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Expedited Partner Therapy (EPT) has been shown to improve treatment outcomes among heterosexual partners of individuals with curable sexually transmitted infections (STIs). Although the use of EPT with men who have sex with men (MSM) has been debated, due to the potential for missed opportunities to diagnose unidentified cases of HIV and syphilis infection in symptomatic partners, increases in partner notification (PN) resulting from use of EPT may promote testing and treatment of otherwise unidentified partners. We assessed the impact of EPT on self-reported PN among MSM in Peru with gonorrheal (GC) and/or chlamydial (CT) infection. METHODS: We enrolled 173 MSM in Lima, Peru with symptomatic or asymptomatic GC and/or CT infection between 2012 and 2014. We enrolled 44 MSM with symptomatic urethritis/proctitis and 129 MSM with asymptomatic GC/CT infection, diagnosed based on nucleic acid testing (Aptima Combo 2 Transcription-Mediated Amplification [TMA]) from urethral, pharyngeal, and rectal sites. Eligible participants were randomly assigned to receive either standard PN counseling (n = 84) or counseling plus EPT (cefixime 400 mg/azithromycin 1 g) for up to five recent partners (n = 89). Self-reported notification was assessed by computer-assisted self-administered survey among 155 participants who returned for 14-day follow-up. RESULTS: The median age of participants was 26 (interquartile range [IQR]: 23-31) with a median of 3 sexual partners (IQR: 2-4) in the previous 30-day period. Among all participants, 111/155 (71.6%) notified at least one partner at 14-day follow-up with a median of 1 partner notified per participant (IQR: 0-2). For participants randomized to receive EPT, 69/83 (83.1%) reported notifying at least one partner, compared with 42/72 (58.3%) of participants in the control arm (odds ratio = 3.52; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.68-7.39). The proportion of all recent partners notified was significantly greater in the EPT than in the control arm (53.5%, 95% CI: 45.0-62.0% versus 36.4%, 95% CI: 27.0-47.4%). CONCLUSIONS: Provision of EPT led to significant increases in notification among Peruvian MSM diagnosed with GC/CT infection. Additional research is needed to assess the impact of EPT on biological outcomes, including persistent or recurrent infection, antimicrobial resistance, and HIV/STI transmission, in MSM sexual networks. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01720654 . Registered on 10/29/2012.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Chlamydia Infections/therapy
Contact Tracing
Gonorrhea/therapy
Sexual Partners
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Homosexuality, Male
Humans
Male
Peru
Pilot Projects
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1710
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170505
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12916-017-0858-9

  6 / 5136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29465655
[Au] Autor:Jordan SJ; Aaron KJ; Schwebke JR; Van Der Pol BJ; Hook EW
[Ad] Address:Department of Medicine, University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Medicine, Birmingham, AL.
[Ti] Title:Defining the Urethritis Syndrome in Men Using Patient Reported Symptoms.
[So] Source:Sex Transm Dis;, 2018 Jan 16.
[Is] ISSN:1537-4521
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/OLQ.0000000000000790

  7 / 5136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29451375
[Au] Autor:Jordá GB; Hanke SE; Ramos-Rincón JM; Mosmann J; Lopéz ML; Entrocassi AC; Cuffini C
[Ad] Address:Graciela Beatriz Jordá, Cátedra de Virología, Facultad de Ciencias Exactas, Químicas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Misiones. Luis Pasteur 1551. CP: 3300. Posadas, Misiones, Argentina. gracielajorda@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Prevalencia y análisis filogenético de Chlamydia trachomatis en una población de mujeres de Posadas, Misiones. [Prevalence and phylogenetic analysis of Chlamydia trachomatis in a population of women in Posadas, Misiones].
[So] Source:Rev Esp Quimioter;31(1):21-26, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1988-9518
[Cp] Country of publication:Spain
[La] Language:spa
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Chlamydia trachomatis is the most prevalent bacteria causing sexually transmitted infections. In women, this infection can cause cervicitis and urethritis, although it's usually asymptomatic. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of C. trachomatis in women attending the lab Instituto de Previsión Social and detect the genotypes. METHODS: Endocervical samples from 505 symptomatic and asymptomatic women were assayed. It was determined the presence of C. trachomatis by PCR through amplification of a fragment of the cryptic plasmid. Positive samples were genotyped by the partial amplification of the ompA gene and analyzed phylogenetically. RESULTS: Forty-three positive samples were detected to infection with C. trachomatis, obtaining a prevalence of 8.5% (IC 95%: 6.4-11.3%). The prevalence of C. trachomatis was higher in women with vaginal symptoms [11.3% (30/265) vs. 5.4% (13/240)] (p = 0.018), as well as in women under 26 year-old [11.5% (28/244) vs. 6.2% (15/246)] (p = 0.021). Based on phylogenetic analysis, it was observed that 62% of the samples were genotype E, 15% genotype J, 15% genotype D, and 8% genotype F. CONCLUSIONS: This work is the first contribution on the molecular epidemiology of C. trachomatis in the Misiones province, Argentina, which shows the rate of prevalence of this bacterium and offers information on circulating genotypes.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180227
[Lr] Last revision date:180227
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 5136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29391293
[Au] Autor:Salakos E; Korb D; Morin C; Sibony O
[Ad] Address:Department of obstetrics and gynaecology, Robert-Debre hospital, 48, boulevard Sérurier, 75019 Paris, France. Electronic address: e.salakos@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:A case of non-treated Trichomonas vaginalis infection and severe preterm labor with positive obstetrical outcome.
[So] Source:J Gynecol Obstet Hum Reprod;, 2018 Jan 31.
[Is] ISSN:2468-7847
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Trichomonas vaginalis is a very common, sexually transmitted, infection that may sometimes be asymptomatic or cause vaginitis and urethritis. Recently, it has been associated with adverse obstetric outcomes such as preterm delivery, low birth weight and premature rupture of membranes. Trichomonas vaginalis can be vertically transmitted at birth. It has been found in pharynx and low respiratory tract of neonates with respiratory disease. It has also been involved in some cases of intellectual disability. The recommended treatment is a 2g metronidazole oral single dose, even for asymptomatic patients. This treatment is effective against Trichomonas and its use is safe during pregnancy. We report here a case of Trichomonas vaginalis infection diagnosed during pregnancy in a patient with severe preterm labor. The patient being allergic to nitroimidazole antibiotics, she did not receive any treatment. She finally gave birth at 34 weeks of gestation (WG) and 5 days, with no other adverse outcome than small prematurity.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180225
[Lr] Last revision date:180225
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 5136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29440466
[Au] Autor:Baumann L; Cina M; Egli-Gany D; Goutaki M; Halbeisen FS; Lohrer GR; Ali H; Scott P; Low N
[Ad] Address:Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland.
[Ti] Title:Prevalence of in different population groups: systematic review and meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Sex Transm Infect;, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1472-3263
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: is a common cause of non-gonococcal non-chlamydial urethritis and cervicitis. Testing of asymptomatic populations has been proposed, but prevalence in asymptomatic populations is not well established. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of in the general population, pregnant women, men who have sex with men (MSM), commercial sex workers (CSWs) and clinic-based samples, METHODS: We searched Embase, Medline, IndMED, African Index Medicus and LILACS from 1 January 1991 to 12 July 2016 without language restrictions. We included studies with 500 participants or more. Two reviewers independently screened and selected studies and extracted data. We examined forest plots and conducted random-effects meta-analysis to estimate prevalence, if appropriate. Between-study heterogeneity was examined using the I statistic and meta-regression. RESULTS: Of 3316 screened records, 63 were included. In randomly selected samples from the general population, the summary prevalence was 1.3% (95% CI 1.0% to 1.8%, I 41.5%, three studies, 9091 people) in countries with higher levels of development and 3.9% (95% CI 2.2 to 6.7, I 89.2%, three studies, 3809 people) in countries with lower levels. Prevalence was similar in women and men (P=0.47). In clinic based samples, prevalence estimates were higher, except in asymptomatic patients (0.8%, 95% CI 0.4 to 1.4, I 0.0%, three studies, 2889 people). Summary prevalence estimates were, in the following groups: pregnant women 0.9% (95% CI 0.6% to 1.4%, I 0%, four studies, 3472 people), MSM in the community 3.2% (95% CI 2.1 to 5.1, I 78.3%, five studies, 3012 people) and female CSWs in the community 15.9% (95% CI 13.5 to 18.9, I 79.9%, four studies, 4006 people). DISCUSSION: This systematic review can inform testing guidelines for . The low estimated prevalence of in the general population, pregnant women and asymptomatic attenders at clinics does not support expansion of testing to these groups. REGISTRATION NUMBERS: PROSPERO: CRD42015020420.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180214
[Lr] Last revision date:180214
[St] Status:Publisher

  10 / 5136 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29431025
[Au] Autor:Ison CA; Fifer H; Gwynn S; Horner P; Muir P; Nicholls J; Radcliffe K; Ross J; Taylor-Robinson D; White J
[Ad] Address:1 Formerly of Public Health England, London, UK.
[Ti] Title:Highlighting the clinical need for diagnosing Mycoplasma genitalium infection.
[So] Source:Int J STD AIDS;:956462417753527, 2018 Jan 01.
[Is] ISSN:1758-1052
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Despite Mycoplasma genitalium (MG) being increasingly recognised as a genital pathogen in men and women, awareness and utility of commercially available MG-testing has been low. The opinion of UK sexual health clinicians and allied professionals was sought on how MG-testing should be used. Thirty-two consensus statements were developed by an expert group and circulated to clinicians and laboratory staff, who were asked to evaluate their level of agreement with each statement; 75% agreement was set as the threshold for defining consensus for each statement. A modified Delphi approach was used and high levels of agreement obviated the need to test the original statement set further. Of 201 individuals who received questionnaires, 60 responded, most (48) being sexual health consultants, more than 10% of the total in the UK. Twenty-seven (84.4%) of the statements exceeded the 75% threshold. Respondents strongly supported MG-testing of patients with urethritis, pelvic inflammatory disease or unexplained persistent vaginal discharge, or post-coital bleeding. Fewer favoured testing patients with proctitis and support was divided for routinely testing Chlamydia-positive patients. Testing of current sexual contacts of MG-positive patients was supported, as was a test of cure for MG-positive patients, although agreement fell below the 75% threshold. Respondents agreed that all consultant- or specialist-led services should have access to testing for MG (98.3%). There was strong agreement for having MG-testing available for specific patient groups, which may reflect concern over antibiotic resistance and the desire to comply with clinical guidelines that recommend MG-testing in sexual health clinic settings.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180212
[Lr] Last revision date:180212
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1177/0956462417753527


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