Database : MEDLINE
Search on : urolithiasis [Words]
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[PMID]: 29520386
[Au] Autor:Ryu HY; Lee YK; Park J; Son H; Cho SY
[Ad] Address:Department of Urology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Dietary risk factors for urolithiasis in Korea: A case-control pilot study.
[So] Source:Investig Clin Urol;59(2):106-111, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:2466-054X
[Cp] Country of publication:Korea (South)
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose: Dietary factors are one of the main causes of urolithiasis. However, little research has evaluated dietary factors related to urolithiasis in Korea. We investigated the various dietary risk factors for urinary stone formation in Korean people. Materials and Methods: We conducted a prospective case-control pilot study. A total of 27 patients newly diagnosed with urolithiasis and 20 applicants without urolithiasis were designated as the patients and the control group, respectively. A face-to-face survey was carried out using a food-frequency questionnaire. After adjustment for physical activity level and total energy intake, multivariate logistic regression models were applied to search for risk factors for urolithiasis. Results: There were no significant differences between the two groups in gender, age, body mass index, family history, or total energy intake. The physical activity level of the control group was significantly higher than that of the patients (p=0.012). The results of the multivariate logistic regression model demonstrated that intake of carbohydrate (odds ratio [OR], 1.055; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.012-1.099), protein (OR, 1.101; 95% CI, 1.001-1.211), and cereals (OR, 1.012; 95% CI, 1.002-1.023) could increase the risk for urolithiasis. Conclusions: A higher intake of carbohydrate, protein, and cereal may increase the risk of urinary stone formation among Korean people.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.4111/icu.2018.59.2.106

  2 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524341
[Au] Autor:Tan T; Zhang J; Xu X; Huang WP; Luo Y
[Ad] Address:The National Pharmaceutical Engineering Center (NPEC) for Solid Preparation in Chinese Herbal Medicine, Jiangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Jiangxi, Nanchang, China.
[Ti] Title:Geographical discrimination of Glechomae Herba based on fifteen phenolic constituents determined by LC-MS/MS method combined with chemometric methods.
[So] Source:Biomed Chromatogr;, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1099-0801
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Glechomae Herba (GH) is rich in bioactive phenolic constituents, which is widely used for treatment of cholelithiasis, urolithiasis and dropsy. The simultaneous determination of phenolic constituents in GH from different geographical origins is significant for authentication and quality control purposes. In this study, we developed a strategy integrating targeted analysis and chemometric methods for quality evaluation and discrimination of GH from different geographical origins. Firstly, an accurate and reliable liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for simultaneous quantification of fifteen phenolic constituents in GH from different geographical origins. The established method was well validated in terms of desirable specificity, linearity, precision and accuracy. Secondly, the quantitative data were subjected to the principal component analysis (PCA) and orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA). Thirdly, a heatmap visualization was employed for clarifying the distribution of fifteen phenolic compounds in GH from different geographical origins. These results indicated that GH samples from Shandong province have obviously different with those from other provinces in the content of bioactive phenolic constituents. Collectively, the proposed platform might be well-acceptable tool for quality evaluation and discrimination of GH from different geographical origins, providing promising perspectives in tracking the formulation processes of TCMs products.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1002/bmc.4239

  3 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29524246
[Au] Autor:Jones ML; Dominguez BJ; Deveau MA
[Ad] Address:Department of Large Animal Clinical Sciences, Texas A&M University College of Veterinary Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, College Station, Texas.
[Ti] Title:An experimental model for calcium carbonate urolithiasis in goats.
[So] Source:J Vet Intern Med;, 2018 Mar 10.
[Is] ISSN:1939-1676
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Calcium carbonate is a common urolith type in small ruminants with no high-yield experimental model to evaluate animal susceptibility or preventative measure response. HYPOTHESIS: That novel plastic winged implants would allow accumulation and quantification of calcium carbonate calculus formation in goats on a high-calcium diet and identify individual variation between goats in the mass of calculi produced. ANIMALS: Eight nonpregnant 3- and 4-year-old Boer-cross does, weighing 22.3-39.5 kg, determined to be healthy based on physical examination, were used in these experiments. METHODS: Prospective cohort study for in vivo experimental model development. Implants were placed into the urinary bladder lumen in 8 goats over 2 evaluation periods. The alfalfa-based ration had a total ration Ca : P of 3.29 and 3.84 : 1, respectively. Urine was collected at 0, 28, 56, and 84 days in the 1st experiment; blood and urine at those timepoints in the 2nd experiment. For each evaluation period, the implants were removed 84 days after implantation and weighed. Accumulated calculi mass was calculated and compared between goats and was analyzed for composition. RESULTS: Implant retention was 100% and 86% in the 2 studies. All goats with retained implants accumulated calcium carbonate at a mean implant gain per day across studies ranging from 0.44 to 57.45 mg. Two goats accumulated (0.44-7.65 mg/day and 33.64 & 57.45 mg/day) significantly more urolith material than the cohort across both studies (P = .047). No routine analytes on blood or urine were found to be explanatory for the difference observed. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL IMPORTANCE: These findings form a basis for implant and diet selection for use in future studies of urolithiasis development and for studies regarding individual susceptibility to urolithiasis.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/jvim.15061

  4 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522553
[Au] Autor:Chen CH; Lin CL; Jeng LB
[Ad] Address:Digestive Disease Center, Show-Chwan Memorial Hospital, Changhua, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Association between chronic pancreatitis and urolithiasis: A population-based cohort study.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(3):e0194019, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Chronic pancreatitis (CP) can cause fat or bile acid malabsorption due to exocrine insufficiency. Fat or bile acid malabsorption has been reported to increase the risk of urolithiasis through increased intestinal oxalate absorption. However, no studies have reported an association between CP and urolithiasis. METHODS: We identified 15,848 patients (age: ≥20 years) diagnosed as having CP between 2000 and 2010 from the National Health Insurance Research Database as the study cohort. Beneficiaries without a history of CP were randomly selected and propensity-matched with the study cohort in a 1:4 ratio according to age; sex; comorbidities of hyperlipidemia, diabetes, obesity, hypertension, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, alcohol-related illness, stroke, and coronary artery disease; and the index date. The prevalence of inflammatory bowel disease (0.44%), hyperparathyroidism (0.10%), or end stage renal disease (1.55%) in CP patients was low, but these comorbidities were also considered in the analysis. All patients were followed until the end of 2011 or withdrawal from the National Health Insurance program to determine the incidence of urolithiasis. RESULTS: The cumulative incidence of urolithiasis was higher in the CP cohort than that in the non-CP cohort (log-rank test, P < 0.001) with a 1.89-fold risk of urolithiasis (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.74-2.06). The prevalence of CP was higher in men (81.9%) and in patients younger than 49 years (63.5%; mean age: 48.5 ± 15.3 years). CP was associated with the development of urolithiasis in each age group (≤49 years: aHR = 2.00, 95% CI = 1.81-2.22; 50-64 years: aHR = 1.71, 95% CI = 1.40-2.09; ≥65 years: aHR = 1.54, 95% CI = 1.20-1.98) and each sex (women: aHR = 2.10, 95% CI = 1.67-2.66; men; aHR = 1.86, 95% CI = 1.70-2.04). Among the patients without comorbidities, the rate of urolithiasis increased from 2.93/1,000 person-years in non-CP patients to 8.28/1,000 person-years in CP patients. Among the patients with comorbidities, the rate of urolithiasis increased from 6.12/1,000 person-years in non-CP patients to 10.9/1,000 person-years in CP patients. The contribution of CP to the relative risk of urolithiasis was greater in patients without comorbidities (without comorbidities: aHR = 2.81, 95% CI = 2.30-3.44) than in those with comorbidities (aHR = 1.76, 95% CI = 1.61-1.94). CONCLUSION: CP is associated with urolithiasis in this population-based cohort study. The contribution of CP to the relative risk of urolithiasis was even greater in patients with a lower risk of urolithiasis, such as those without other comorbidities. Our findings warrant a survey and education on urolithiasis for patients with CP.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0194019

  5 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29505519
[Au] Autor:Guo ZL; Wang JY; Gong LL; Gan S; Gu CM; Wang SS
[Ad] Address:The Second Clinical College, Guangzhou University of Chinese Medicine, Guangzhou.
[Ti] Title:Association between cadmium exposure and urolithiasis risk: A systematic review and meta-analysis.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(1):e9460, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: We performed a meta-analysis to determine whether a consistent relationship exists between cadmium exposure and urolithiasis in humans. Accordingly, we summarized and reviewed previously published quantitative studies. METHODS: Eligible studies with reference lists published before June 1, 2017 were obtained from searching several databases. Random effects models were used to summary the overall estimate of the multivariate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). RESULTS: Six observational studies involving 88,045 participants were identified and stratified into the following categories according to cadmium assessment results: occupational (n = 4) and dietary (n = 2). The findings of the meta-analysis suggested that the risk of urolithiasis increases significantly by 1.32 times at higher cadmium exposure (OR = 1.32; 95% CI = 1.08-1.62; for highest vs lowest category urinary cadmium values). The summary OR in occupational exposure (OR = 1.56; 95% CI = 1.13-2.14) increased at the same condition. Meanwhile, no association was observed between cadmium exposure and urolithiasis risk in dietary exposure (OR = 1.13; 95% CI = 0.87-1.47). A significant association remained consistent, as indicated by subgroup analyses and sensitivity analyses. CONCLUSIONS: The meta-analysis indicated that increased risk of urolithiasis is associated with high cadmium exposure, and this association is higher in occupational exposure than in dietary exposure. Nevertheless, well-designed observational studies with different ethnic populations are still needed.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cadmium/toxicity
Occupational Exposure/adverse effects
Urolithiasis/chemically induced
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:00BH33GNGH (Cadmium)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180306
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000009460

  6 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29376598
[Au] Autor:Arustamov LD; Katibov MI; Merinov DS; Gurbanov SS; Artemov AV; Epishov VA
[Ad] Address:N.A. Lopatkin Scientific Research Institute of Urology and Interventional Radiology branch of the NMRRC of Minzdrav of Russia, Moscow, Russia.
[Ti] Title:[Analysis of clinical effectiveness and risk factors for complication of percutaneous nephrolototripsia in patients with a solitary kidney].
[So] Source:Urologiia;(6):65-71, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1728-2985
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:RELEVANCE: Management of patients with large and staghorn stones of a solitary kidney is widely debated among urologists and has not been sufficiently investigated, which determined the relevance of this study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study comprised 80 patients with large (>20 mm) and staghorn stones of an anatomically or functionally solitary kidney. Of them, 58 patients underwent percutaneous nephrolithotripsy (PNL), and 22 had open surgery. The criterion of the treatment effectiveness was the complete stone clearance or small residual fragments sized less than 3 mm. The safety criterion was the absence of intra- and postoperative complications, according to Clavien-Dindo grading system. The study analyzed the following factors influencing the effectiveness and safety of PNL: the number of accesses; nephroscope diameter; use of a nephroscope sheath; type of lithotripter; size, density, type and composition of the stone. RESULTS: Percutaneous nephrolithotripsy demonstrated statistically significantly better safety results compared with open surgery with comparable effectiveness. Long-term stone recurrence rate after PNL and open surgery was 10.4 and 18.2%, respectively. PNL resulted in a statistically significant improvement in the kidney function while it worsened after open surgery. The effectiveness of PNL depends on the stone type and size and the kind of lithotripter. It was 7.5 times greater for a large stone than for staghorn calculi and 4.6 times higher for stones sized less or equal 45 mm than for those sized > 45 mm. Ultrasonic lithotripter was 2.2 times more effective than another type of lithotripter. The safety of PNL depends on the nephroscope diameter, of a sheath, the number of accesses, the type of lithotripter and the type of stone. Using a 24-Ch nephroscope was 3.6 times safer than that with a diameter greater than 24-Ch; not using a sheath was 3.2 times safer than using it; one access was 3 times safer than at multiple ones; using an ultrasound lithotripter was 2.7 times safer than with another type of lithotripter; treating a large stone was 2.1 times safer than a staghorn stone. CONCLUSION: The study findings can be used to optimize the treatment of patients with large and staghorn stones of a solitary kidney.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Kidney Calculi
Kidney
Nephrolithotomy, Percutaneous/methods
Postoperative Complications/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adult
Female
Follow-Up Studies
Humans
Kidney/diagnostic imaging
Kidney/surgery
Kidney Calculi/diagnostic imaging
Kidney Calculi/surgery
Male
Middle Aged
Nephrolithotomy, Percutaneous/adverse effects
Retrospective Studies
Risk Factors
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  7 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29376594
[Au] Autor:Kadyrov ZA; Suleymanov SI; Ramishvili VS; Istratov VG
[Ad] Address:Faculty of Postgraduate Education of the RUDN University, Moscow, Russia.
[Ti] Title:[Clinical and biochemical aspects of pathogenesis of urolithiasis].
[So] Source:Urologiia;(6):43-49, 2017 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1728-2985
[Cp] Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
[La] Language:rus
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: To investigate the role of infection in the pathogenesis of urolithiasis using chromatography mass spectrometry analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The study analyzed clinical and laboratory data of 316 urolithiasis patients hospitalized between February 2005 and January 2015. All patients underwent a comprehensive clinical examination, including laboratory tests (hematological and biochemical blood tests, clinical and bacteriological tests of urine) and chromatography mass spectrometry analysis urine and blood. The laboratory testing was carried out both during the patients hospital stay and outpatient follow-up. RESULTS: We analyzed the biological material for the presence of characteristic ions. Urine samples of 316 urolithiasis patients were found to contain activators of "cooperative sensitivity." Moreover, there was a significant increase in the concentration of signaling compounds of the "cooperative sensitivity" of microorganisms in patients with complicated urolithiasis in comparison with the control indices (lactones-0.006 plus/minus 0.0004 mmol/L, normal values less than 0.002, quinolones 0.004 plus/minus 0.0003 mmol/l, normal values - less than 0.002 and furan esters - 0.005 plus/minus 0.0004, normal values less than 0.002). Threshold values of the activators of "cooperative sensitivity" demonstrated the readiness of the microbial community to initiate an inflammatory process. The presence of activators such as lactones, quinolones and furan esters in the samples of urolithiasis patients predisposes to the activation of pathogenic genes in a large group of microorganisms, including gram positive and gram negative species. DISCUSSION: In our opinion, to improve the quality of diagnostic, treatment and preventive measures in patients with different types of stone formation, it is advisable to use chromatography mass spectrometry analysis, which allows determination of priority clinical and laboratory indicators. CONCLUSION: The data on the role of infection in the pathogenesis of urolithiasis obtained by chromatographic methods suggest the possibility of using the indicators of the activators of the "cooperative sensitivity" of microbes in patients with various forms of urolithiasis to assess the disease severity.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Lactones/blood
Lactones/urine
Quinolones/blood
Quinolones/urine
Urolithiasis/blood
Urolithiasis/urine
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Lactones); 0 (Quinolones)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522293
[Au] Autor:Prattley S; Voss J; Cheung S; Geraghty R; Jones P; Somani BK
[Ad] Address:University Hospital Southampton, NHS Trust, United Kingdom, UK.
[Ti] Title:Ureteroscopy and stone treatment in the elderly (≥70 years): prospective outcomes over 5- years with a review of literature.
[So] Source:Int Braz J Urol;44, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1677-6119
[Cp] Country of publication:Brazil
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To assess outcomes of ureteroscopy for treatment of stone disease in the elderly. Ureteroscopy (URS) is an increasingly popular treatment modality for urolithiasis and its applications are ever expanding with the development of newer technologies. Its feasibility and outcomes within the elderly population to our knowledge remain under-reported. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We examined the patient demographics and surgical outcomes from our prospective database for patients ≥70 years who underwent URS for urolithiasis, in a 5-year period between March 2012 and December 2016. RESULTS: A total of 110 consecutive patients underwent 121 procedures (1.1 procedure/ patient) with a mean age of 77.2 years (range: 70-91 years). Stone location was in the kidney/ pelviureteric junction (PUJ) in 29%, ureter in 37% and in multiple locations in 34%. The initial and final stone free rate (SFR) was 88% and 97% respectively. While 73% were done as true day case procedures, 89% patients were discharged within 24 hours. Eleven patients (9%) underwent complications of which 10 were Clavien I/II including acute urinary retention, urinary tract infection, stent symptoms and pneumonia. One patient underwent Clavien IV complication where they needed intensive care unit admission for urosepsis but fully recovered and were discharged home subsequently. CONCLUSION: Ureteroscopy is a safe and effective method of managing urolithiasis in elderly patients. Although most patients are discharged within 24-hours, consideration needs to be made for patients where social circumstances can impact their discharge planning.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1590/S1677-5538.IBJU.2017.0516

  9 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29520723
[Au] Autor:Ergul AB; Kara M; Karakukcu C; Tasdemir A; Aslaner H; Ergul MA; Muhtaroglu S; Zararsiz GE; Torun YA
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics, University of Health Sciences, Kayseri Training and Research Hospital, Kayseri, Turkey. abergul@hotmail.com.
[Ti] Title:High Doses of Boron Have No Protective Effect Against Nephrolithiasis or Oxidative Stress in a Rat Model.
[So] Source:Biol Trace Elem Res;, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1559-0720
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Boron plays roles in the metabolism of calcium, vitamin D, steroid hormones, healthy bone development, and maintenance of cell membranes. The biological effects of boron are dose-dependent but follow a U-shaped pattern, rendering it important to define the active range. The studies of Bahadoran et al. on rats and Naghii et al. on humans showed that low doses of boron (3 and 10 mg/day) prevented kidney stone formation. The aim of this study was to determine whether high doses of boron have an anti-urolithiatic or antioxidant effect on nephrolithiasis in an experimental rat model. The study was conducted on 50 adult male Wistar rats randomized to five groups. Nephrolithiasis was induced with water containing 0.75% ethylene glycol (EG) and 2% ammonium chloride (AC). This treatment was given to animals in all groups for 10 days, except the positive and negative controls. Simultaneously, groups 2, 3, and 4 were given boric acid via gavage at doses of 25, 50, and 100 mg/kg/day (equivalent to 4/8/16 mg boron respectively) as the source of boron. Animals in the negative and positive control groups were given 6 µL/g distilled water without boric acid. At day 10, intra-cardiac blood samples were drawn from all animals. The right and left kidneys were removed for biochemical and histopathological examinations, respectively. The groups were compared with respect to serum urea, creatinine, calcium, phosphorous, total antioxidant status (TAS), total oxidant status (TOS), serum paraoxonase (PON1) activity, tissue calcium and oxalate levels, and stone burden as determined by histopathological examination. Serum urea and creatinine levels were significantly higher (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05, respectively), while serum calcium and phosphorous levels were significantly lower (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively), in animals given EG/AC compared to negative controls. No significant differences were detected in serum calcium, phosphorous, urea, or creatinine levels between animals treated with boron and positive controls (p > 0.05). Serum PON1 activity was significantly lower in animals given EG/AC than in negative controls (p < 0.001), while no significant difference in serum PON1 level was detected between rats treated with boron and positive controls. No significant differences were detected in vitamin D, TAS, TOS, tissue calcium, or tissue oxalate levels among groups. No stone formation was detected on histopathological examination in negative controls. No significant differences were found in stone formation between rats treated with boron and positive controls. Based on this study, high doses of boron had no protective effect against nephrolithiasis and oxidative stress.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s12011-018-1294-1

  10 / 7489 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519638
[Au] Autor:Meibom S
[Ti] Title:Patient-Friendly Summary of the ACR Appropriateness Criteria Acute Onset Flank Pain-Suspicion of Stone Disease (Urolithiasis).
[So] Source:J Am Coll Radiol;, 2018 Mar 05.
[Is] ISSN:1558-349X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher


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