Database : MEDLINE
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[PMID]: 29350503
[Au] Autor:Golubovic M; Lopicic M; Terzic N; Durovic M; Mugosa B; Mijovic G
[Ti] Title:Presence of histopathological premalignant lesions and infection caused by high-risk genotypes of human papillomavirus in patients with suspicious cytological and colposcopy results: A prospective study.
[So] Source:Vojnosanit Pregl;74(1):24-30, 2017 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:0042-8450
[Cp] Country of publication:Serbia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background/Aim: In patients with premalignant cervical lesions, human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, at any moment, may be spontaneously eliminated, or may persist or transform cervical epithelium from a lower to a higher degree. Due to that, it is necessary to wisely select the patients who are at high risk of cancer development. The aim of the study was to establish the interdependence between a suspicious Papanicolaou (Pap) test and colposcopy with the infection caused by high-risk genotypes of human papillomavirus and the presence of premalignant cervical lesions. Methods: This prospective study used cytological, colposcopy, real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of high-risk genotypes of human papillomavirus and histopathological analysis of cervical biopsy specimen. Out of 2,578 female patients sent to cytological analyses in Clinical Center of Montenegro, during 2012, 2013 and 2014, the study included 80 women who had to submit their biopsy specimens due to a suspicious Pap test and atypical colposcopy results. Results: In the group of 80 (3.1%; n = 80/2,578) of the selected female patients with suspicious Pap test and colposcopy, 2/3 or 56 (70%) of them had cervicitis, and 1/3 or 24 (30%) had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The most common type in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia was HPV16 in 8 female patients, ie 61.53% out of the number of infected, or 33.33% out of the total number of premalignant lesions Conclusion: Patients with suspicious Papanicolaou test, colposcopy results and infection which is caused by high-risk HPV infection (HPV 16 in particular) often have premalignant cervical lesions. In these cases, histopathological confirmation of lesions is mandatory, since it serves as a definitive diagnostic procedure.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Atypical Squamous Cells of the Cervix/pathology
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/pathology
Colposcopy
DNA, Viral/genetics
Human Papillomavirus DNA Tests
Papanicolaou Test
Papillomaviridae/genetics
Papillomavirus Infections/virology
Precancerous Conditions/pathology
Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions of the Cervix/pathology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/pathology
Vaginal Smears
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Atypical Squamous Cells of the Cervix/virology
Biopsy
Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia/virology
Child
Child, Preschool
Female
Genotype
Humans
Infant
Middle Aged
Neoplasm Staging
Papillomavirus Infections/pathology
Precancerous Conditions/virology
Predictive Value of Tests
Prospective Studies
Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction
Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions of the Cervix/virology
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/virology
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (DNA, Viral)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180213
[Lr] Last revision date:180213
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180120
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2298/VSP150205143G

  2 / 2317 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29331480
[Au] Autor:Xu HH; Zheng LZ; Lin AF; Dong SS; Chai ZY; Yan WH
[Ad] Address:Laboratory of Gynecologic Oncology, Medical Research Center, Taizhou Hospital of Zhejiang Province, Wenzhou Medical University, Linhai, Zhejiang, China.
[Ti] Title:Human papillomavirus (HPV) 18 genetic variants and cervical cancer risk in Taizhou area, China.
[So] Source:Gene;647:192-197, 2018 Mar 20.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0038
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 18 is predominantly associated with the development of cervical adenocarcinomas, whereas data on HPV18 genetic variability in China are limited. HPV18 genetic variants were formed phylogenetic tree, including lineages A, B, and C. We aimed to evaluate the diversity of HPV18 genetic variants by sequencing the entire E6, E7 and L1 genes. Between 2012 and 2015, a total of 138 (0.8%, 138/17669) women with single HPV18 infection were selected in this study. Finally, we observed 122 HPV18 isolates of the complete E6-E7-L1 sequences, and obtained 36 distinct variation patterns which the accession GenBank numbers as KY457805-KY457840. Except KY457805, KY457813, KY457819, KY457827, KY457829, the rest of HPV18 isolates (81.1%, 31/36) are novel variants. All of HPV18 variants belong to lineage A, while no lineage B, and C was found in our population of Taizhou region, Southeast China. Sublineage A1 was the most common variants (85.2%, 104/122), followed by sublineage A4, A3 and A5, while no sublineage A2 was obtained. Based on the tree topologies, there were three newly identified candidates' sublineages A6-A8. Out of 122 women, 67 (54.9%) had diagnosed by biopsy, including 49 women who diagnosed with cervicitis, 12 with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN)1, 4 with CIN2/3, and 2 with adenocarcinomas, respectively. Nevertheless, there was no association between HPV18 (sub) lineages and CIN1 or worse (CIN1+) lesions comparing with normal biopsies (P = .469). In conclusion, knowledge of the distribution of geographic/ethnical HPV18 genetic diversity provides critical information for developing diagnostic probes, epidemiologic correlate of cervical cancer risk and design of HPV vaccines for targeted populations.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Genetic Variation/genetics
Human papillomavirus 18/genetics
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/virology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Adenocarcinoma/virology
Adolescent
Adult
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Capsid Proteins/genetics
China
Female
Genotype
Humans
Middle Aged
Oncogene Proteins, Viral/genetics
Papillomavirus E7 Proteins/genetics
Papillomavirus Infections/complications
Papillomavirus Infections/virology
Risk
Uterine Cervical Neoplasms/etiology
Young Adult
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Capsid Proteins); 0 (Oncogene Proteins, Viral); 0 (Papillomavirus E7 Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180209
[Lr] Last revision date:180209
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180115
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 2317 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29259042
[Au] Autor:Stanley RL; Ohashi T; Gordon J; Mowa CN
[Ad] Address:Department of BiologyAppalachian State University, Boone, North Carolina, USA.
[Ti] Title:A proteomic profile of postpartum cervical repair in mice.
[So] Source:J Mol Endocrinol;60(1):17-28, 2018 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1479-6813
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A timely and complete uterine cervical tissue repair postpartum is of necessity to prevent obstetrical complications, such as cervicitis, ectropion, hemorrhage, repeated miscarriages or abortions and possibly preterm labor and malignancies. We recently characterized the morphological alterations, as well as changes in angiogenic expression profile in a mice uterine cervix during the immediate postpartum period. Here, we build on this previous study using a proteomic analysis to profile postpartum tissue changes in mice cervix during the same period, the first 48 h of postpartum. The current proteomics data reveal a variable expression of several intermediate filaments, cytoskeletal modulators and proteins with immune and/or wound-healing properties. We conclude that postpartum cervical repair involves a rapid and tightly regulated balance between a host of biological factors, notably between anti- and pro-inflammatory factors, executed by the M1 and M2 macrophage cells, as revealed by proteomics and verified by confocal immunofluorescence. Future studies will assess the suitability of some of the key proteins identified in this study as potential markers for determining the phase of postpartum cervical repair in obstetrical complications, such as cervical lacerations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 171220
[Lr] Last revision date:171220
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1530/JME-17-0179

  4 / 2317 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28883273
[Au] Autor:Mutoh T; Takatsuki H; Mannoji K; Kawamura K; Okura N; Ohshima K
[Ad] Address:Department of Hematological Internal Medicine, Kokura Medical Center, National Hospital Organization.
[Ti] Title:Regression of uterine cervical diffuse large B-cell lymphoma transformed from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue lymphoma subsequent to Chlamydia trachomatis eradication.
[So] Source:Rinsho Ketsueki;58(8):912-916, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:0485-1439
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:A 37-year-old-woman was referred to our center after her uterine cervix health screening presented abnormal findings. We performed a biopsy of the uterine cervix to examine for cervical dysplasia, and diagnosed a diffuse large B-cell lymphoma transformed from mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue (MALT) lymphoma of the cervix. The patient presented with concurrent chlamydial cervicitis and received eradication therapy for Chlamydia trachomatis. Four months later, the CD20 positive abnormal lymphocyte disappeared and complete remission was achieved. MALT lymphoma is considered to correlate with infection and inflammation. Particularly, the relationship between gastric MALT lymphoma and Helicobacter pylori is well known. MALT lymphoma of the uterine cervix is rare, and its relationship with C.trachomatis infection is unknown. Further studies are warranted to investigate this association.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 171019
[Lr] Last revision date:171019
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.11406/rinketsu.58.912

  5 / 2317 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28838078
[Au] Autor:Wiesenfeld HC; Manhart LE
[Ad] Address:Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Sciences, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, and Magee-Womens Research Institute, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
[Ti] Title:Mycoplasma genitalium in Women: Current Knowledge and Research Priorities for This Recently Emerged Pathogen.
[So] Source:J Infect Dis;216(suppl_2):S389-S395, 2017 Jul 15.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6613
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Health consequences of sexually transmitted diseases disproportionately affect women, making it important to determine whether newly emerged pathogens cause sequelae. Although the pathogenic role of Mycoplasma genitalium in male urethritis is clear, fewer studies have been conducted among women to determine its pathogenic role in the female reproductive tract. Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is an important cause of infertility and ectopic pregnancy, and Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae are recognized microbial causes. Emerging data demonstrate an association between M. genitalium and PID, and limited data suggest associations with infertility and preterm birth, yet the attributable risk for female genital tract infections remains to be defined. Further investigations are needed to better define the impact of M. genitalium on women's reproductive health. Importantly, prospective studies evaluating whether screening programs and targeted treatment of M. genitalium improve reproductive outcomes in women are necessary to guide public health policy for this emerging pathogen.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Mycoplasma Infections/complications
Mycoplasma Infections/diagnosis
Mycoplasma genitalium/isolation & purification
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease/microbiology
Uterine Cervicitis/microbiology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Humans
Infertility, Female/etiology
Male
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease/complications
Pregnancy
Pregnancy, Ectopic/etiology
Premature Birth/etiology
Risk Factors
Uterine Cervicitis/complications
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170906
[Lr] Last revision date:170906
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170826
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/infdis/jix198

  6 / 2317 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28838077
[Au] Autor:McGowin CL; Totten PA
[Ad] Address:Departments of 1 Microbiology, Immunology, and Parasitology.
[Ti] Title:The Unique Microbiology and Molecular Pathogenesis of Mycoplasma genitalium.
[So] Source:J Infect Dis;216(suppl_2):S382-S388, 2017 Jul 15.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6613
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Mycoplasma genitalium is increasingly appreciated as a common cause of sexually transmitted disease syndromes, including urethritis in men and cervicitis, endometritis, pelvic inflammatory disease, and possibly preterm birth, tubal factor infertility, and ectopic pregnancy in women. Despite these disease associations, which parallel those of Chlamydia trachomatis and Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the mechanisms by which this pathogen elicits inflammation, causes cellular damage, and persists in its only natural host (humans) are unique and are not fully understood. The purpose of this review is to briefly provide a historical background on the discovery, microbiology, and recognition of M. genitalium as a pathogen, and then summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular biology and pathogenesis of this unique urogenital organism. Collectively, the basic scientific discussions herein should provide a framework for understanding the clinical and epidemiological outcomes described in the accompanying articles in this supplemental issue.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Immune Evasion
Mycoplasma Infections/immunology
Mycoplasma genitalium/genetics
Mycoplasma genitalium/pathogenicity
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Bacterial/immunology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Female
Genome, Bacterial
Humans
Immunity
Male
Mycoplasma genitalium/immunology
Risk Factors
Sexually Transmitted Diseases, Bacterial/complications
Urethritis/complications
Urethritis/microbiology
Uterine Cervicitis/complications
Uterine Cervicitis/microbiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170906
[Lr] Last revision date:170906
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170826
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/infdis/jix172

  7 / 2317 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28838072
[Au] Autor:Gaydos CA
[Ad] Address:Division of Infectious Diseases, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland.
[Ti] Title:Mycoplasma genitalium: Accurate Diagnosis Is Necessary for Adequate Treatment.
[So] Source:J Infect Dis;216(suppl_2):S406-S411, 2017 Jul 15.
[Is] ISSN:1537-6613
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Mycoplasma genitalium is very difficult to grow in culture but has been more able to be studied for disease associations since the advent of research molecular amplification assays. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and other molecular assays have demonstrated an association with adverse disease outcomes, such as urethritis or nongonococcal urethritis in men and adverse reproductive sequelae in women-for example, cervicitis, endometritis, and pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), including an association with risk for human immunodeficiency virus. The lack of commercially available diagnostic assays has limited widespread routine testing. Increasing reports of high rates of resistance to azithromycin detected in research studies have heightened the need available commercial diagnostic assays as well as standardized methods for detecting resistance markers. This review covers available molecular methods for the diagnosis of M. genitalium and assays to predict the antibiotic susceptibility to azithromycin. Methods: A PubMed (US National Library of Medicine and National Institutes of Health) search was conducted for literature published between 2000 and 2016, using the search terms Mycoplasma genitalium, M. genitalium, diagnosis, and detection. Results: Early PCR diagnostic tests focused on the MPa adhesion gene and the 16S ribosomal RNA gene. Subsequently, a transcription-mediated amplification assay targeting ribosomes was developed and widely used to study the epidemiology of M. genitalium. Newer methods have proliferated and include quantitative PCR for organism load, AmpliSens PCR, PCR for the pdhD gene, a PCR-based microarray for multiple sexually transmitted infections, and multiplex PCRs. None yet are cleared by the Food and Drug Administration in the United States, although several assays are CE marked in Europe. As well, many research assays, including PCR, gene sequencing, and melt curve analysis, have been developed to detect the 23S ribosomal RNA gene mutations that confer resistance to azithromycin. One recently developed assay can test for both M. genitalium and azithromycin resistance mutations at the same time. Conclusions: It is recommended that more commercial assays to both diagnose this organism and guide treatment choices should be developed and made available through regulatory approval. Research is needed to establish the cost-effectiveness of routine M. genitalium testing in symptomatic patients and screening in all individuals at high risk of acquiring and transmitting sexually transmitted infections.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Mycoplasma Infections/diagnosis
Mycoplasma genitalium/isolation & purification
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use
Azithromycin/therapeutic use
Drug Resistance, Bacterial
Female
Humans
Macrolides/therapeutic use
Male
Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction
Mutation
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease/complications
Pelvic Inflammatory Disease/microbiology
RNA, Ribosomal, 16S/genetics
Urethritis/complications
Urethritis/microbiology
Uterine Cervicitis/complications
Uterine Cervicitis/microbiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Anti-Bacterial Agents); 0 (Macrolides); 0 (RNA, Ribosomal, 16S); 83905-01-5 (Azithromycin)
[Em] Entry month:1709
[Cu] Class update date: 170906
[Lr] Last revision date:170906
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170826
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1093/infdis/jix104

  8 / 2317 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28616412
[Au] Autor:Sisakht AJ; Omidifar N; Mohamadkhani N; Karimpoorfard M; Kargar M; Shokripour M
[Ad] Address:Department of Medical Microbiology, Paraclinic Faculty, Yasuj University of Medical Sciences, Yasuj, Iran.
[Ti] Title:Assessing the presence of genome in pregnant women with spontaneous abortion using polymerase chain reaction method in Yasuj: First report from Southwest of Iran.
[So] Source:J Educ Health Promot;6:45, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:2277-9531
[Cp] Country of publication:India
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:CONTEXT: is one of the most prevalent factors of sexually transmitted diseases worldwide, which causes abortion, premature rupture of membrane, uterine cervicitis, pelvic inflammatory diseases, and ectopic pregnancy. AIMS: The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of genome in pregnant women with abortion in Yasuj, Iran. SETTINGS AND DESIGN: This is a descriptive-analytical study in Shahid Mofateh Gyneco-obstetrics clinic and Emam sajjad Hospital. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Specimens of cervix, urine, placenta, and blood of 107 pregnant women were simultaneously collected at maternity ward and operation room and were stored for molecular tests. The molecular tests were performed, and the results were analyzed. STATISTICAL ANALYSIS USED: Analysis was performed using SPSS software 9.1 (IBM, Illinois, Chicago, USA) with descriptive-analytical statistics. RESULTS: Of 107 women, 15 had polymerase chain reaction-positive tests for . The age of the studied individuals was 15-38 years with mean age of 26.6 years. The highest infection rates were in the age group of 21-25 years (7.47%), and the lowest frequency was in the age group of 36-40 years. A significant difference was noted between the number of first abortions in the case and control groups. CONCLUSIONS: Our results showed that as a sexually transmitted agent causes severe complications such as abortion; thus, it is important to screen pregnant and sexually active women who are craving to carry a baby.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170902
[Lr] Last revision date:170902
[St] Status:PubMed-not-MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.4103/jehp.jehp_6_17

  9 / 2317 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28582343
[Au] Autor:Karpathiou G; Dal P; Chauleur C; Peoc'h M
[Ad] Address:Departments of Pathology (G.K, P.D.C., M.P.) Obstretics and Gynecology (C.C.), North Hospital, University Hospital of St-Etienne, St-Etienne, France.
[Ti] Title:Intravascular Lymphocytic Accumulation in the Uterine Cervix: A Frequent Finding.
[So] Source:Int J Gynecol Pathol;, 2017 Jun 02.
[Is] ISSN:1538-7151
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Intravascular accumulation of lymphocytes in any body site can raise concerns for a lymphoproliferative disorder, mainly intravascular lymphoma, leukemia, or a form of angiocentric lymphoma. We recently found an intravascular lymphocytic accumulation of non-neoplastic nature in a uterine cervix. The aim of the study was to define the frequency and the nature of this observation in the uterine cervix. Thirty cervical excision specimens including 23 cone biopsies and 7 hysterectomies were examined for the presence of intravascular accumulation of lymphocytes. Intravascular accumulation of lymphocytes was observed in 9 of the 30 specimens (30%). These were small-sized or medium-sized lymphocytes accumulating in lymphatic channels. The lymphocytes showed no atypia or mitotic activity. Intravascular lymphocytic accumulation was more common in cases with severe cervicitis (P<0.0001). Immunohistochemically, there was a mixed population of lymphocytes that were CD20 and CD3 positive; they were negative for CD30. Similar but larger lymph-node-like structures were noted inside the paracervical tissue in cases of wide excision. Intralymphatic accumulation of small nonatypical lymphocytes sometimes forming small corpuscles is a frequent and benign finding of the uterine cervix.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1706
[Cu] Class update date: 170605
[Lr] Last revision date:170605
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/PGP.0000000000000407

  10 / 2317 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28545987
[Au] Autor:Ali A; Derar D; Alsamri A; Al Sobayil F
[Ad] Address:Department of Veterinary Medicine, College of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, Qassim University, 51452 Qassim, Saudi Arabia; Department of Theriogenology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Assiut University, 71526 Assiut, Egypt. Electronic address: drahmedali77@gmail.com.
[Ti] Title:Echography of clinically relevant disorders in the genital tract of female dromedary camels.
[So] Source:Anim Reprod Sci;182:123-133, 2017 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1873-2232
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this study was to characterize the clinically relevant genital tract disorders of dromedary camels. Reproductive tract examinations were performed via transrectal palpation, ultrasonography and vaginal exploration. The ultrasonic appearance of the reproductive pathology was described and compared with its morphology at laparotomy, after surgical removal, during postmortem examination or upon slaughter. Diagnosis was also confirmed by histopathology. The most frequently encountered follicular structures were larger than typical follicles (56/338, 16.6%) having three echo textures: 1) thin walls and clear hyperechogenic content (11.6%); 2) thick walls and few fibrous trabeculae (33.7%); and 3) thick walls and many echogenic transecting fibrinous strands (54.7%). Corpora lutea with non-echoic central cavity (5/31, 16.1%) were greater in diameter than those with no cavity (26/31, 83.9%) (P=0.03). A granulosa cell tumor (1/338, 0.3%) was multilocular and honeycombed in shape. Presence of a large, well-demarcated, hypoechogenic sac lateral to or beneath the uterine horn encasing the ovary was diagnostic for ovarian hydrobursitis (102/338, 30.2%). Hydrosalpinx and pyosalpinx (6/338, 1.8%) were beaded in appearance, with the ovary located outside these structures. Clinical endometritis/cervicitis (122, 36.1%) was characterized by changes in the homogeneity in about half of the cases. A greatly dilated uterus with clear, hypoechogenic or echogenic contents with signs of hydrometra and pyometra, respectively, was another categorization of a reproductive pathology (24/338, 7.1%). Highly reflective, linear structures were observed in cases with intrauterine fetal bone retention (1/338, 0.3%). In conclusion, reproductive pathologies in dromedary camels can be efficiently imaged by use of ultrasonic technologies, thus familiarizing the practitioner with these disorders and facilitating application of these technologies so that suitable treatment can occur is important in managing reproduction of dromedary camels.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1705
[Cu] Class update date: 170613
[Lr] Last revision date:170613
[St] Status:In-Process


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