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[PMID]: 29462021
[Au] Autor:Ahadiat O; Higgins S; Ly A; Nazemi A; Wysong A
[Ad] Address:Department of Dermatology, Keck Medicine of USC, Los Angeles, California.
[Ti] Title:Review of Endovenous Thermal Ablation of the Great Saphenous Vein: Endovenous Laser Therapy Versus Radiofrequency Ablation.
[So] Source:Dermatol Surg;, 2018 Feb 15.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4725
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Endovenous thermal ablation is a popular treatment for varicose veins of the greater saphenous vein. Two common techniques of thermal ablation are endovenous laser therapy (EVLT) and radiofrequency ablation (RFA). OBJECTIVE: The authors compare EVLT and RFA in vein therapy. METHODS: A review was conducted using PubMed. Studies comparing the treatment modalities were gathered and compared on the basis of 5 main standpoints, including: efficacy, side effects, serious complications, recurrence, and quality of life. RESULTS: It was found that EVLT and RFA are both highly efficacious (>80%). Endovenous laser therapy seems to be slightly more efficacious than RFA in numerous studies but its significance is uncertain. Side effect profiles varied regarding postoperative pain and bruising because both were seen to be significantly less using RFA. Serious complications were found to be rare in both with no significant difference in incidence. Recanalization rate was observed to be higher using RFA with uncertainty in significance among various studies. Quality of life improved after both procedures with no significant difference among the 2. CONCLUSION: Efficacy and recurrence rate seem to favor EVLT, whereas postoperative pain and bruising favor RFA. Further studies are needed to validate the significance of the differences found.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1097/DSS.0000000000001478

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[PMID]: 29342028
[Au] Autor:Grisolia ABD; Nelson CC
[Ad] Address:Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, Michigan, U.S.A.
[Ti] Title:Lymphedema-Distichiasis Syndrome in a Male Patient Followed for 16 Years.
[So] Source:Ophthal Plast Reconstr Surg;34(2):e63-e65, 2018 Mar/Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1537-2677
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Distichiasis is a challenging condition that may require multiple surgical interventions. Besides ophthalmologic concerns in children, distichiasis may be part of the lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome, which presents with lymphedema of variable time of onset. Other significant systemic disorders such as coarctation of the aorta and varicose veins have been reported in association with this syndrome and must be reviewed for proper patient care. The authors report the case of a 22-year-old male patient who had been treated for distichiasis and followed for 16 years. At his initial evaluation, at 6 years of age, he presented solely with ocular complaints due to distichiasis. Only after 13 years of repeated ophthalmic treatments and continuous follow up, lymphedema was observed. Lymphedema-distichiasis syndrome diagnosis must be considered in children with distichiasis, even in the absence of lymphedema.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1097/IOP.0000000000001037

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[PMID]: 29198293
[Au] Autor:Gupta R; Ulfberg J; Allen RP; Goel D
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Himalayan Institute of Medical Sciences, Swami Ram Nagar, Jolly Grant, Dehradun, India.
[Ti] Title:Comparison of Subjective Sleep Quality of Long-Term Residents at Low and High Altitudes: SARAHA Study.
[So] Source:J Clin Sleep Med;14(1):15-21, 2018 Jan 15.
[Is] ISSN:1550-9397
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:STUDY OBJECTIVES: To study the effect of altitude on subjective sleep quality in populations living at high and low altitudes after excluding cases of restless legs syndrome (RLS). METHODS: This population-based study was conducted at three different altitudes (400 m, 1,900-2,000 m, and 3,200 m above sea level). All consenting subjects available from random stratified sampling in the Himalayan and sub-Himalayan regions of India were included in the study (ages 18 to 84 years). Sleep quality and RLS status were assessed using validated translations of Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) and Cambridge Hopkins RLS diagnostic questionnaire. Recent medical records were screened to gather data for medical morbidities. RESULTS: In the total sample of 1,689 participants included, 55.2% were women and average age of included subjects was 35.2 (± 10.9) years. In this sample, overall 18.4% reported poor quality of sleep (PSQI ≥ 5). Poor quality of sleep was reported more commonly at high altitude compared to low altitude (odds ratio [OR] = 2.65; 95% CI = 1.9-3.7; < .001). It was more frequently reported among patients with RLS (29.7% versus 17.1% without RLS; < .001). Other factors that were associated with poor quality of sleep were male sex, smoking, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and varicose veins. Binary logistic regression indicated that COPD (OR = 1.97; 95% CI = 1.36-2.86; < .001), high altitude (OR = 2.22; 95% CI = 1.55-3.18; < .001), and RLS (OR = 1.66; 95% CI = 1.12-2.46; = .01) increased the odds for poor quality of sleep. CONCLUSIONS: This study showed that poor quality of sleep was approximately twice as prevalent at high altitudes compared to low altitudes even after removing the potential confounders such as RLS and COPD.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.5664/jcsm.6870

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[PMID]: 29428534
[Au] Autor:Huang C; Yu G; Huang J
[Ad] Address:Department of Vascular Surgery, The First Affiliated Hospital of Wenzhou Medical University, Wenzhou, China. Electronic address: christopherhuang@qq.com.
[Ti] Title:Midterm Results of Endovascular Treatment for Iliac Vein Compression Syndrome from a Single Center.
[So] Source:Ann Vasc Surg;, 2018 Feb 09.
[Is] ISSN:1615-5947
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: The efficacy of endovascular interventional treatment for iliac vein compression syndrome (IVCS) is not well studied. The purpose of our study was to investigate the clinical outcome of endovascular interventional treatment for IVCS. METHODS: Data of 68 patients with IVCS, who underwent interventional treatment in our hospital, were analyzed retrospectively. Among these patients, 46 had lower extremity varicose veins. Sixty-five patients underwent stent implantation, and 3 patients underwent simple balloon angioplasty. Fourteen patients had post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) and 11 patients had acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Among these 14 patients with PTS, 12 underwent stent implantation and 2 underwent iliac venous simple balloon angioplasty. On the other hand, 9 of the 11 patients with DVT underwent catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) and then stent implantation. Of the remaining 2 patients, one underwent Angiojet Rheolytic thrombectomy (ART) before CDT and the other underwent CDT with simple balloon angioplasty. The stenosis rate of iliac vein and the circumference differences between the affected limb and healthy one were measured before and after operation. These patients were followed up with duplex ultrasound postoperatively. RESULTS: A total of 75 stents were placed in 65 patients. The diameter and the length of stent were 6 to 14 mm (mean 12.5 ± 2.0 mm) and 40 to 260 mm (mean 82.5 ± 36.9 mm), respectively. CDT with/without ART was performed, using urokinase and/or alteplase, after inferior vena cava filtration in all of 11 patients with DVT, without the recurrence of pulmonary embolism. The difference in iliac venous stenosis was statistically significant ([91.2% ± 8.4%] [70.0% ∼ 100.0%] vs. 3.9% ± 13.0% [0 ∼ 70.0%], P < 0.01). The patency rates at 1-, 3-, 6- months, 1 year, and 2 years were 98.5%, 95.6%, 94.1%, 92.4%, and 90.7%, respectively. Four patients (5.9%) suffered from minor bleeding at puncture point and were successfully treated with compression. However, 1 (1.5%) patient underwent stent implantation of right iliac vein that became complicated due to migration of stent to the right ventricle which was successfully arrested by Amplatz Goose Neck Snare Kit. The incidence of PTS was 10.3% (7/68) during the follow-up at 1 to 24 (mean 18.2 ± 7.7) months. CONCLUSIONS: Interventional therapy for patients of IVCS is safe and effective. Satisfactory outcomes were obtained for stent placement for IVCS.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 12641 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29249768
[Au] Autor:Baha A; Baha RM; Eroglu V; Logoglu A; Icen YK
[Ad] Address:Department of Pulmonary Medicine, Osmaniye National Hospital, Turkey.
[Ti] Title:A Case of Massive Pulmonary Embolism Following Varicose Vein Surgery That Was Successfully Treated with Thrombolytic Therapy.
[So] Source:Intern Med;56(24):3409, 2017.
[Is] ISSN:1349-7235
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Pulmonary Embolism
Thrombolytic Therapy
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Varicose Veins
Vascular Surgical Procedures
[Pt] Publication type:LETTER; COMMENT
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171219
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.2169/internalmedicine.9213-17

  6 / 12641 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29502781
[Au] Autor:Gibson K; Gunderson K
[Ad] Address:Lake Washington Vascular Surgeons, 1135 116th Avenue Northeast, Suite 305, Bellevue, WA 98004, USA. Electronic address: drgibson@lkwv.com.
[Ti] Title:Liquid and Foam Sclerotherapy for Spider and Varicose Veins.
[So] Source:Surg Clin North Am;98(2):415-429, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1558-3171
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Sclerotherapy has wide applicability in treating venous disease at every stage of clinical disease. The various sclerosant drugs and formulations each have unique properties, utilities, and side effects. Treating physicians should be aware of the differences between agents, accounting for disease presentation, vein characteristics, and patient comorbidities when selecting the appropriate sclerosing agents. Successful outcomes rely on proper patient evaluation and assessment for contraindications to sclerotherapy. Thorough patient education regarding realistic expectations with sclerotherapy in terms of symptoms relief, recurrence, and improvement in appearance is of chief importance.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process

  7 / 12641 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29502780
[Au] Autor:Geersen DF; Shortell CEK
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery, Division of Vascular and Endovascular Surgery, Duke University Medical Center, Box: DUMC 3538, Durham, NC 27710, USA. Electronic address: daniel.geersen@duke.edu.
[Ti] Title:Phlebectomy Techniques for Varicose Veins.
[So] Source:Surg Clin North Am;98(2):401-414, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1558-3171
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ambulatory phlebectomy is a well-known and widely used procedure for residual symptomatic venous disease. Tumescent anesthesia complements the procedure, providing the ability to perform this intervention in a wide range of practice settings. The procedures are well tolerated by most patients, and complications are rare. They include venous thromboembolism, infection, and hematoma and are generally simple to manage. Alternative and emerging techniques of powered phlebectomy and cyanoacrylate glue are providing alternative forms for treatment and will advance the practice further.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process

  8 / 12641 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29502775
[Au] Autor:Raffetto JD
[Ad] Address:Harvard Medical School, VA Boston Healthcare System, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, USA; VA Boston HCS, Surg 112, 1400 VFW Parkway, West Roxbury, MA 02132, USA. Electronic address: joseph.raffetto@med.va.gov.
[Ti] Title:Pathophysiology of Chronic Venous Disease and Venous Ulcers.
[So] Source:Surg Clin North Am;98(2):337-347, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1558-3171
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Chronic venous disease and venous leg ulceration are a common disease affecting millions of individuals. The fundamental problem is venous hypertension with resultant clinical manifestations of venous disease including varicose veins, skin changes, and venous leg ulceration. The pathophysiology leading to venous hypertension is complex and multifactorial, involving genetic predisposition, environmental factors, hormones, endothelial dysfunction, inflammatory cells and molecules and activation on the endothelium and vein wall, and disturbances in the balance of cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases. Understanding the pathophysiology of chronic venous disease and venous leg ulcers identifies cellular pathways, biomarkers, metabolic signatures, and cellular cross-talk for targeted therapy.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process

  9 / 12641 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29486040
[Au] Autor:Chang SL; Huang YL; Lee MC; Hu S; Hsiao YC; Chang SW; Chang CJ; Chen PC
[Ad] Address:Vein Clinic, Department of Dermatology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Association of Varicose Veins With Incident Venous Thromboembolism and Peripheral Artery Disease.
[So] Source:JAMA;319(8):807-817, 2018 02 27.
[Is] ISSN:1538-3598
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: Varicose veins are common but rarely associated with serious health risks. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT), pulmonary embolism (PE), and peripheral artery disease (PAD) are also vascular diseases but associated with serious systemic effects. Little is known about the association between varicose veins and the incidence of other vascular diseases including DVT, PE, and PAD. Objective: To investigate whether varicose veins are associated with an increased risk of DVT, PE, or PAD. Design, Setting, and Participants: A retrospective cohort study using claims data from Taiwan's National Health Insurance program. Patients aged 20 years and older with varicose veins were enrolled from January 1, 2001-December 31, 2013, and a control group of patients without varicose veins were matched by propensity score. Patients previously diagnosed with DVT, PE, or PAD were excluded. Follow-up ended December 31, 2014. Exposures: Presence of varicose veins. Main Outcomes and Measures: Incidence rates of DVT, PE, and PAD were assessed in people with and without varicose veins. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate relative hazards, with the control group as reference. Results: There were 212 984 patients in the varicose veins group (mean [SD] age, 54.5 [16.0] years; 69.3% women) and 212 984 in the control group (mean [SD] age, 54.3 [15.6] years; 70.3% women). The median follow-up duration was 7.5 years for DVT, 7.8 years for PE, and 7.3 years for PAD for patients with varicose veins, and for the control group, follow-up duration was 7.6 years for DVT, 7.7 years for PE, and 7.4 years for PAD. The varicose veins group had higher incidence rates than the control group for DVT (6.55 vs 1.23 per 1000 person-years [10 360 vs 1980 cases]; absolute risk difference [ARD], 5.32 [95% CI, 5.18-5.46]), for PE (0.48 for the varicose veins group vs 0.28 for the control group per 1000 person-years [793 vs 451 cases]; ARD, 0.20 [95% CI, 0.16-0.24]), and for PAD (10.73 for the varicose veins group vs 6.22 for the control group per 1000 person-years [16 615 vs 9709 cases]; ARD, 4.51 [95% CI, 4.31-4.71]). The hazard ratios for the varicose veins group compared with the control group were 5.30 (95% CI, 5.05-5.56) for DVT, 1.73 (95% CI, 1.54-1.94) for PE, and 1.72 (95% CI, 1.68-1.77) for PAD. Conclusions and Relevance: Among adults diagnosed with varicose veins, there was a significantly increased risk of incident DVT; the findings for PE and PAD are less clear due to the potential for confounding. Whether the association between varicose veins and DVT is causal or represents a common set of risk factors requires further research.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180302
[Lr] Last revision date:180302
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1001/jama.2018.0246

  10 / 12641 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29173136
[Au] Autor:Bai T; Chen Y; Jiang W; Yan F; Fan Y
[Ad] Address:1 Department of Applied Mechanics, Sichuan University, Chengdu, China.
[Ti] Title:Studies on Foam Decay Trend and Influence of Temperature Jump on Foam Stability in Sclerotherapy.
[So] Source:Vasc Endovascular Surg;52(2):98-106, 2018 Feb.
[Is] ISSN:1938-9116
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVES: This study investigated the influence of temperature jump and liquid-gas ratio on foam stability to derive the foam-decay law. METHODS: The experimental group conditions were as follows: mutation temperatures (10°C, 16°C, 20°C, 23°C, 25°C, and 27°C to >37°C) and liquid-gas ratios (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 1:4). The control group conditions were as follows: temperatures (10°C, 16°C, 20°C, 23°C, 25°C and 27°C) and liquid-gas ratios (1:1, 1:2, 1:3, and 1:4). A homemade device manufactured using the Tessari DSS method was used to prepare the foam. The decay process was videotape recorded. In the drainage rate curve, the temperature rose, and the liquid-gas ratio varied from 1:1 to 1:4, causing faster decay. RESULTS: In the entire process, the foam volume decreased with increasing drainage rate. The relationships were almost linear. Comparison of the experimental and control groups shows that the temperature jump results in a drainage time range of 1 to 15 seconds. The half-life ranges from 10 to 30 seconds. The maximum rate is 18.85%. Changes in the preparation temperature yields a drainage time range of 3 to 30 seconds. The half-life varies from 20 to 60 seconds. CONCLUSION: Decreasing the temperature jump range and liquid-gas ratio gradually enhances the foam stability. The foam decay time and drainage rate exhibit an exponential function distribution.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Sclerosing Solutions/chemistry
Sclerotherapy/methods
Sodium Morrhuate/chemistry
Temperature
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Drug Stability
Half-Life
Linear Models
Models, Chemical
Phase Transition
Time Factors
Video Recording
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Sclerosing Solutions); 8031-09-2 (Sodium Morrhuate)
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180228
[Lr] Last revision date:180228
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:171128
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1177/1538574417741786


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