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  1 / 31967 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29377910
[Au] Autor:Ikezono T; Matsumura T; Matsuda H; Shikaze S; Saitoh S; Shindo S; Hasegawa S; Oh SH; Hagiwara Y; Ogawa Y; Ogawa H; Sato H; Tono T; Araki R; Maeda Y; Usami SI; Kase Y
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Saitama Medical University, Saitama, Japan.
[Ti] Title:The diagnostic performance of a novel ELISA for human CTP (Cochlin-tomoprotein) to detect perilymph leakage.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(1):e0191498, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Perilymphatic fistula is defined as an abnormal communication between the perilymph-filled space and the middle ear, or cranial spaces. The manifestations include a broad spectrum of neuro-otological symptoms such as hearing loss, vertigo/dizziness, disequilibrium, aural fullness, tinnitus, and cognitive dysfunction. By sealing the fistula, perilymphatic fistula is a surgically correctable disease. Also, appropriate recognition and treatment of perilymphatic fistula can improve a patient's condition and hence the quality of life. However, the difficulty in making a definitive diagnosis due to the lack of an appropriate biomarker to detect perilymph leakage has caused a long-standing debate regarding its management. We have reported a clinical test for the diagnosis of perilymphatic fistula by detecting a perilymph specific protein, Cochlin-tomoprotein, as a diagnostic marker using a western blot. The aim of this study is to establish an ELISA-based human Cochlin-tomoprotein detection test and to evaluate its diagnostic accuracy in clinical subjects. The results of ELISA showed good dilution reproducibility. The mean concentration was 49.7±9.4 of 10 perilymph samples. The ROC curve in differentiating the perilymph leakage condition from the normal middle ear was significant (P < 0.001) with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.918 (95% CI 0.824-0.100). We defined the diagnostic criteria as follows: CTP<0.4 negative; 0.4≦CTP<0.8 intermediate; 0.8≦CTP(ng/ml) positive in the clinical usage of the hCTP ELISA, and sensitivity and specificity were 86.4% and 100%, respectively. We further tested the expression specificity of the Cochlin-tomoprotein by testing blood and CSF samples. The concentration was below the detection limit (0.2 ng/ml) in 38 of the 40 blood, and 14 of the 19 CSF samples. We report the accuracy of this test for the diagnosis of perilymphatic fistula. Using ELISA, we can improve the throughput of the test. Furthermore, it is useful for a large-scale study to characterize the clinical picture and delineate the management of this medical condition.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay/methods
Extracellular Matrix Proteins/metabolism
Perilymph/metabolism
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Blotting, Western
Extracellular Matrix Proteins/blood
Extracellular Matrix Proteins/cerebrospinal fluid
Humans
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (COCH protein, human); 0 (Extracellular Matrix Proteins)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180130
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0191498

  2 / 31967 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29519455
[Au] Autor:Dieterich M; Brandt T
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany; German Center for Vertigo and Balance Disorders-IFB, Ludwig-Maximilians-University, Munich, Germany; Munich Cluster for Systems Neurology (SyNergy), Munich, Germany. Electronic address: Marianne.Dieterich@med.uni-muenchen.de.
[Ti] Title:The parietal lobe and the vestibular system.
[So] Source:Handb Clin Neurol;151:119-140, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:0072-9752
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The vestibular cortex differs in various ways from other sensory cortices. It consists of a network of several distinct and separate temporoparietal areas. Its core region, the parietoinsular vestibular cortex (PIVC), is located in the posterior insula and retroinsular region and includes the parietal operculum. The entire network is multisensory (in particular, vestibular, visual, and somatosensory). The peripheral and central vestibular systems are bilaterally organized; there are various pontomesencephalic brainstem crossings and at least two transcallosal connections of both hemispheres, between the PIVC and the motion-sensitive visual cortex areas, which also mediate vestibular input. Structural and functional vestibular dominance characterizes the right hemisphere in right-handers and the left hemisphere in left-handers. This explains why right-hemispheric lesions in right-handers more often generally cause hemispatial neglect and the pusher syndrome, both of which involve vestibular function. Vestibular input also contributes to cognition and may determine individual lateralization of brain functions such as handedness. Bilateral organization is a major key to understanding cortical functions and disorders, for example, the visual-vestibular interaction that occurs in spatial orientation. Although the vestibular cortex is represented in both hemispheres, there is only one global percept of body position and motion. The chiefly vestibular aspects of the multiple functions and disorders of the parietal lobe dealt with in this chapter cannot be strictly separated from various multisensory vestibular functions within the entire brain.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 31967 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29466539
[Au] Autor:Roberts RA
[Ad] Address:Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, Nashville, TN.
[Ti] Title:Management of Recurrent Vestibular Neuritis in a Patient Treated for Rheumatoid Arthritis.
[So] Source:Am J Audiol;27(1):19-24, 2018 Mar 08.
[Is] ISSN:1558-9137
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Purpose: This clinical report is presented to describe how results of vestibular function testing were considered along with other medical history to develop a management plan that was ultimately successful. Method: The patient underwent audio-vestibular assessment including comprehensive audiogram, videonystagmography, cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential, and postural stability testing. Results: Results from initial testing were most consistent with uncompensated peripheral vestibular dysfunction affecting the right superior vestibular nerve. These results, considered along with history and symptoms, supported vestibular neuritis. After a second vertigo event, we became concerned about the potential temporal association between the patient's rheumatoid arthritis treatment and symptom onset. It is established that treatment for rheumatoid arthritis can exacerbate latent viral issues, but this has not specifically been reported for vestibular neuritis. There are reports in the literature in which patients successfully used viral suppressant medication to decrease viral activity while they were able to continue benefiting from immunosuppressive therapy. We hypothesized that, if the current patient's vestibular neuritis events were related to her treatment for rheumatoid arthritis, she may also benefit from use of viral suppressant medication while continuing her otherwise successful immunosuppressive intervention. Conclusions: Patients treated with biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are more susceptible to viral issues, and this may include vestibular neuritis. For the current case, identifying this possibility and recommending viral suppressant medication allowed her to continue with successful treatment of rheumatoid arthritis while avoiding additional vertigo events.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1044/2017_AJA-17-0090

  4 / 31967 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29459396
[Au] Autor:Saber Tehrani AS; Kattah JC; Kerber KA; Gold DR; Zee DS; Urrutia VC; Newman-Toker DE
[Ad] Address:From the Department of Neuro-Ophthalmology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Boston (A.S.S.T.); Department of Neurology, University of Illinois College of Medicine in Peoria (J.C.K.); Department of Neurology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor (K.A.K.); and D
[Ti] Title:Diagnosing Stroke in Acute Dizziness and Vertigo: Pitfalls and Pearls.
[So] Source:Stroke;49(3):788-795, 2018 03.
[Is] ISSN:1524-4628
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1161/STROKEAHA.117.016979

  5 / 31967 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29197811
[Au] Autor:Reneker JC; Cheruvu VK; Yang J; James MA; Cook CE
[Ad] Address:Department of Biostatistics, Environmental Health Sciences, and Epidemiology, College of Public Health, Kent State University, Kent, OH, United States; Department of Physical Therapy, School of Health Related Professions, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, MS, United States; Departme
[Ti] Title:Physical examination of dizziness in athletes after a concussion: A descriptive study.
[So] Source:Musculoskelet Sci Pract;34:8-13, 2018 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:2468-7812
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Dizziness is commonly reported after concussion. With the forces experienced at the time of the injury, several anatomical locations may have been altered, causing dizziness. OBJECTIVE: Describe an objective examination and the types of impairment/dysfunction implicated by the results of clinical examination tests in subjects with dizziness after a concussion. DESIGN: Cross-Sectional. METHODS: Athletes between ages 10-23 were enrolled with a diagnosis of concussion. An examination was completed to identify areas potentially contributing to dizziness, including tests of oculomotor control, the vestibular system, neuromotor control, and musculoskeletal components of the cervical spine. Descriptive analyses were completed to define the anatomical areas/types of dysfunction identified by positive findings of the examination tests. RESULTS: All (n = 41; 100%) subjects had examination findings consistent with central dysfunction. Of these, 36 (97.8%) had oculomotor control deficits; 29 (70.7%) demonstrated motion sensitivity; and 6 (15%) had central vestibular deficits. Nineteen (46.3%) had peripheral dysfunction, including 18 (43.9%) with unilateral hypofunction, and 2 (4.9%) with Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo. Thirty-four (82.9%) had cervical dysfunction, with 11 (26.8%) presenting with cervicogenic dizziness, and 31 (75.6%) with altered neuromotor control. CONCLUSIONS: Functional injury to centrally-mediated pathways, specifically oculomotor control, and afferent and efferent pathways in the cervical spine are commonly identified through clinical examination tests in individuals with a complaint of dizziness post-concussion. According to results presented here, a high majority (90%) of the participants demonstrated dizziness that appeared to be multifactorial in nature and was not attributable to one main type of dysfunction. The common pathways between the systems make it difficult to isolate only one anatomical area as a contributor to dizziness.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  6 / 31967 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29513720
[Au] Autor:Hoppes CW; Sparto PJ; Whitney SL; Furman JM; Huppert TJ
[Ad] Address:Department of Physical Therapy, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States of America.
[Ti] Title:Functional near-infrared spectroscopy during optic flow with and without fixation.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(3):e0193710, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Individuals with visual vertigo describe symptoms of dizziness, disorientation, and/or impaired balance in environments with conflicting visual and vestibular information or complex visual stimuli. Physical therapists often prescribe habituation exercises using optic flow to treat these symptoms, but there are no evidence-based guidelines for delivering optic flow and it is unclear how the brain processes such stimuli. The purposes of this study were to use functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS) to explore cerebral activation during optic flow, and determine if visual fixation had a modulating effect on brain activity. METHODS: Fifteen healthy participants (7 males and 8 females; mean age 41 years old) stood in a virtual reality environment and viewed optic flow moving unidirectionally in the yaw plane with and without fixation. Changes in cerebral activation were recorded from the bilateral fronto-temporo-parietal and occipital lobes using fNIRS. RESULTS: Cerebral activation was greater with visual motion than while viewing a stationary scene. Greater cerebral activation in the bilateral fronto-temporo-parietal lobes was observed when optic flow was viewed with fixation. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: Optic flow activates the bilateral fronto-temporo-parietal regions of the cerebral cortex. This activation is greater while viewing optic flow and a fixation target, providing preliminary evidence supporting the use of a fixation target during habituation exercises.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0193710

  7 / 31967 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29513688
[Au] Autor:Kim SK; Kim JH; Jeon SS; Hong SM
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Dongtan Sacred Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Hwaseong, Korea.
[Ti] Title:Relationship between sleep quality and dizziness.
[So] Source:PLoS One;13(3):e0192705, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:1932-6203
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Poor sleep quality has a number of significant negative effects on daytime function. However, few studies have examined sleep quality in patients with dizziness. Here, we investigated the potential association between sleep quality and various types of dizziness. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We examined dizziness and sleep disturbance in 237 patients experiencing dizziness using Korean versions of the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), the Insomnia Severity Index (ISI), and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). All participants were classified as having benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), Ménière's disease (MD), vestibular neuritis (VN), vestibular migraine (VM), psychogenic dizziness (PD), or Other. RESULTS: The mean PSQI and ISI scores were highest in the PD group. The rate of sleep disturbance was highest in the Other group when the cut-off score for each questionnaire was set differently, except ISI ≥ 15. The correlation between DHI and sleep disturbance indices was highest in the VM group. Multivariate regression showed that PSQI score and DHI-E score were significantly related to the PD and Other groups, while the Other group was significantly related to the ISI score. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study strongly suggest that there are associations between sleep quality and some disease subtypes associated with dizziness. Therefore, it is important to consider sleep disturbance in patients with psychogenic dizziness, such as phobic postural vertigo and chronic subjective dizziness, or nonspecific dizziness.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1371/journal.pone.0192705

  8 / 31967 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29493628
[Au] Autor:Zamyslowska-Szmytke E; Szostek-Rogula S; Sliwinska-Kowalska M
[Ad] Address:Instytut Medycyny Pracy im. prof. J. Nofera / Nofer Institute of Occupational Medicine, Lódz, Poland (Klinika Audiologii i Foniatrii / Audiology and Phoniatrics Clinic). ewa.zamyslowska@imp.lodz.pl.
[Ti] Title:Badanie czynnosciowe osób z zawrotami glowy i zaburzeniami równowagi dla potrzeb medycyny pracy. [Functional assessment of patients with vertigo and dizziness in occupational medicine].
[So] Source:Med Pr;, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:0465-5893
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:pol
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Balance assessment relies on symptoms, clinical examination and functional assessment and their verification in objective tests. Our study was aimed at calculating the assessment compatibility between questionnaires, functional scales and objective vestibular and balance examinations. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A group of 131 patients (including 101 women; mean age: 59±14 years) of the audiology outpatient clinic was examined. Benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, phobic vertigo and central dizziness were the most common diseases observed in the study group. Patients' symptoms were tested using the questionnaire on Cawthworne-Cooksey exercises (CC), Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) and Duke Anxiety-Depression Scale. Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Dynamic Gait Index (DGI), the Tinetti test, Timed Up and Go test (TUG), and Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA) were used for the functional balance assessment. Objective evaluation included: videonystagmography caloric test and static posturography. RESULTS: The study results revealed statistically significant but moderate compatibility between functional tests BBS, DGI, TUG, DVA and caloric results (Kendall's W = 0.29) and higher for posturography (W = 0.33). The agreement between questionnaires and objective tests were very low (W = 0.08-0.11).The positive predictive values of BBS were 42% for caloric and 62% for posturography tests, of DGI - 46% and 57%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The results of functional tests (BBS, DGI, TUG, DVA) revealed statistically significant correlations with objective balance tests but low predictive values did not allow to use these tests in vestibular damage screening. Only half of the patients with functional disturbances revealed abnormal caloric or posturography tests. The qualification to work based on objective tests ignore functional state of the worker, which may influence the ability to work. Med Pr 2018;69(2).
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher

  9 / 31967 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29429184
[Au] Autor:Gu CY; Han WW; Wu YQ; Fan ZY; Chen CJ; Chen HM
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurology, Ningbo No.2 Hospital, Ningbo 315010, China.
[Ti] Title:[Study on bone metabolism in postmenopausal women with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo].
[So] Source:Zhonghua Er Bi Yan Hou Tou Jing Wai Ke Za Zhi;53(2):134-137, 2018 Feb 07.
[Is] ISSN:1673-0860
[Cp] Country of publication:China
[La] Language:chi
[Ab] Abstract:To analyze the bone mineral density and serum osteocalcin levels in postmenopausal women with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. A total of 64 postmenopausal women with idiopathic BPPV were selected as the study group, and 98 postmenopausal healthy women were selected as the control group. Bone mineral density and serum osteocalcin levels were analyzed and compared between the groups.χ(2) test was used for numeration data and test was used for measurement data. The prevalence of osteoporosis or osteopenia in BPPV group 67.2% (43/64) was significantly higher than that in the control group 51.0% (50/98) (χ(2)=4.139, =0.042). Among BPPV subjects, there was a negative correlation between osteocalcin and bone density T ( =-0.469, <0.001). Osteocalcin was found in normal bone mass subgroup (13.61±4.32)µg/L, decreased bone mass subgroup (17.49±7.61)µg/L, and osteoporosis subgroup (20.83±6.72)µg/L, respectively, and the difference was statistically significant ( =5.39, =0.007). Bone mineral density in BPPV group is lower than that in control group. The lower the bone mineral density of the patients, the higher the osteocalcin in BPPV group.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Benign Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo/blood
Bone Density
Osteocalcin/blood
Postmenopause/blood
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Case-Control Studies
Female
Humans
Osteoporosis/epidemiology
Prevalence
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:104982-03-8 (Osteocalcin)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:180213
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.3760/cma.j.issn.1673-0860.2018.02.010

  10 / 31967 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29513260
[Au] Autor:Sowula K; Skladzien J; Szaleniec J; Gawlik J
[Ad] Address:Otolaryngology Clinic, Jagiellonian University Collegium Medicum, Krakow, Poland; Head Department: Jacek Skladzien, PH, MD.
[Ti] Title:Otolaryngological symptoms in patients treated for tick-borne diseases.
[So] Source:Otolaryngol Pol;72(1):30-34, 2018 Feb 28.
[Is] ISSN:2300-8423
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:infections are borreliosis (Lyme disease) and tick-borne encephalitis (TBE). Lately there is growing incidence of Bartonella, Babesia, Anaplasma and Brucella co-infections. The similarity between the symptoms of tick-borne diseases and other pathologies causes serious diagnostic issues. MATERIAL AND METHODS: 216 patients aged 18-55, who presented to the outpatient clinic for tick-borne diseases in the years 2014-2016, were enrolled in the study. The patients had been diagnosed with Lyme disease and co-infections. The principal diagnostic tests to confirm the infections included ELISA, Western-Blot and circulating immune complexes (CIC). RESULTS: In the group of 216 patients, 162 presented with otolaryngological symptoms. The most common complaint was tinnitus (76,5%) accompanied by vertigo and dizziness (53,7%), headache (39%), unilateral sensorineural hearing loss (16,7%). The patients also had tick-borne coinfections, among them the most common was Bartonella henselae (33,4%) and Bartonella quintana (13%). CONCLUSIONS: Otolaryngological symptoms are a common manifestation of tick-borne diseases. They are most frequently observed in Lyme disease and Bartonella spp. infections. The symptoms in the head and neck region are usually occur in chronic Lyme disease with predominant IgG antibodies nad VlsE antigen.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.5604/01.3001.0011.5948


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