Database : MEDLINE
Search on : vestibulocochlear and nerve and injuries [Words]
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  1 / 201 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28818271
[Au] Autor:Tigno TA; Armonda RA; Bell RS; Severson MA
[Ad] Address:Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD, United States. Electronic address: teodoro.tigno@usuhs.edu.
[Ti] Title:The vestibulocochlear bases for wartime posttraumatic stress disorder manifestations.
[So] Source:Med Hypotheses;106:44-56, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2777
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Preliminary findings based on earlier retrospective studies of 229 wartime head injuries managed by the Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC)/National Naval Medical Center (NNMC) Neurosurgery Service during the period 2003-08 detected a threefold rise in Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) manifestations (10.45%) among Traumatic Brain Injuries (TBI) having concomitant vestibulocochlear injuries compared to 3% for the TBI group without vestibulo-cochlear damage (VCD), prompting the authors to undertake a more focused study of the vestibulo-auditory pathway in explaining the development of posttraumatic stress disorder manifestations among the mostly Blast-exposed head-injured. The subsequent historical review of PTSD pathophysiology studies, the evidence for an expanded vestibular system and of a dominant vestibular system, the vascular vulnerability of the vestibular nerves in stress states as well as the period of cortical imprinting has led to the formation of a coherent hypotheses utilizing the vestibulocochlear pathway in understanding the development of PTSD manifestations. Neuroimaging and neurophysiologic tests to further validate the vestibulocochlear concept on the development of PTSD manifestations are proposed.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1708
[Cu] Class update date: 170818
[Lr] Last revision date:170818
[St] Status:In-Process

  2 / 201 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 28314420
[Au] Autor:Osetinsky LM; Hamilton GS; Carlson ML
[Ad] Address:Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic, 200 1st Street Southwest, Rochester, MN 55905, USA.
[Ti] Title:Sport Injuries of the Ear and Temporal Bone.
[So] Source:Clin Sports Med;36(2):315-335, 2017 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1556-228X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:In cases of head trauma, the ear should be evaluated in all of its components. A good understanding of otologic and skull base anatomy enables a thorough trauma assessment of this complex anatomic region. Auricular laceration, abrasion, avulsion, hematoma, frostbite, otitis externa, exostosis, tympanic membrane perforation, ossicular discontinuity, perilymphatic fistula, labyrinthine concussion, temporal bone fracture, facial nerve paresis, and sensorineural hearing loss are a few of the more common otologic injuries seen in active patients. Prevention of otologic trauma by wearing protective equipment during activity is the best way of maintaining the long-term health of the ear and audiovestibular function.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Athletic Injuries
Ear/injuries
Temporal Bone/injuries
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Athletic Injuries/diagnosis
Athletic Injuries/prevention & control
Athletic Injuries/therapy
Ear/anatomy & histology
Humans
Physical Examination
Skull Base/anatomy & histology
Temporal Bone/anatomy & histology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1707
[Cu] Class update date: 170713
[Lr] Last revision date:170713
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170319
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  3 / 201 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27257624
[Au] Autor:Anttonen T; Herranen A; Virkkala J; Kirjavainen A; Elomaa P; Laos M; Liang X; Ylikoski J; Behrens A; Pirvola U
[Ad] Address:Department of Biosciences, University of Helsinki , 00014 Helsinki, Finland.
[Ti] Title:c-Jun N-Terminal Phosphorylation: Biomarker for Cellular Stress Rather than Cell Death in the Injured Cochlea.
[So] Source:eNeuro;3(2), 2016 Mar-Apr.
[Is] ISSN:2373-2822
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Prevention of auditory hair cell death offers therapeutic potential to rescue hearing. Pharmacological blockade of JNK/c-Jun signaling attenuates injury-induced hair cell loss, but with unsolved mechanisms. We have characterized the c-Jun stress response in the mouse cochlea challenged with acoustic overstimulation and ototoxins, by studying the dynamics of c-Jun N-terminal phosphorylation. It occurred acutely in glial-like supporting cells, inner hair cells, and the cells of the cochlear ion trafficking route, and was rapidly downregulated after exposures. Notably, death-prone outer hair cells lacked c-Jun phosphorylation. As phosphorylation was triggered also by nontraumatic noise levels and none of the cells showing this activation were lost, c-Jun phosphorylation is a biomarker for cochlear stress rather than an indicator of a death-prone fate of hair cells. Preconditioning with a mild noise exposure before a stronger traumatizing noise exposure attenuated the cochlear c-Jun stress response, suggesting that the known protective effect of sound preconditioning on hearing is linked to suppression of c-Jun activation. Finally, mice with mutations in the c-Jun N-terminal phosphoacceptor sites showed partial, but significant, hair cell protection. These data identify the c-Jun stress response as a paracrine mechanism that mediates outer hair cell death.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Biomarkers/metabolism
Hair Cells, Vestibular/metabolism
Hearing Loss, Noise-Induced/pathology
JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism
Vestibulocochlear Nerve Injuries/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Animals, Newborn
Apoptosis
Cell Death/drug effects
Cell Death/physiology
DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics
DNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism
Disease Models, Animal
Female
Green Fluorescent Proteins/genetics
Green Fluorescent Proteins/metabolism
Kanamycin/toxicity
Male
Mice
Mice, Inbred CBA
Mice, Transgenic
Noise/adverse effects
Protein Synthesis Inhibitors/toxicity
Time Factors
Transcription Factors/genetics
Transcription Factors/metabolism
Vestibulocochlear Nerve Injuries/chemically induced
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers); 0 (DNA-Binding Proteins); 0 (Gfi1 protein, mouse); 0 (Protein Synthesis Inhibitors); 0 (Transcription Factors); 147336-22-9 (Green Fluorescent Proteins); 59-01-8 (Kanamycin); EC 2.7.11.24 (JNK Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases)
[Em] Entry month:1612
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160604
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  4 / 201 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26859792
[Au] Autor:Landier W
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Institute for Cancer Outcomes and Survivorship, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
[Ti] Title:Ototoxicity and cancer therapy.
[So] Source:Cancer;122(11):1647-58, 2016 Jun 01.
[Is] ISSN:1097-0142
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ototoxicity is a well-established toxicity associated with a subgroup of antineoplastic therapies that includes platinum chemotherapy, radiation or surgery involving the ear and auditory nerve, and supportive care agents such as aminoglycoside antibiotics and loop diuretics. The reported prevalence of ototoxicity in patients who have received potentially ototoxic therapy ranges from 4% to 90% depending on factors such as age of the patient population, agent(s) used, cumulative dose, and administration techniques. The impact of ototoxicity on subsequent health-related and psychosocial outcomes in these patients can be substantial, and the burden of morbidity related to ototoxic agents is particularly high in very young children. Considerable interindividual variability in the prevalence and severity of ototoxicity has been observed among patients receiving similar treatment, suggesting genetic susceptibility as a risk factor. The development and testing of otoprotective agents is ongoing; however, to the author's knowledge, no US Food and Drug Administration-approved otoprotectants are currently available. Prospective monitoring for ototoxicity allows for comparison of auditory outcomes across clinical trials, as well as for early detection, potential alterations in therapy, and auditory intervention and rehabilitation to ameliorate the adverse consequences of hearing loss. Cancer 2016;122:1647-58. © 2016 American Cancer Society.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Antineoplastic Agents/adverse effects
Ear Diseases/etiology
Neoplasms/therapy
Postoperative Complications/etiology
Radiotherapy/adverse effects
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Age Factors
Ear/anatomy & histology
Ear/physiology
Ear/radiation effects
Ear Diseases/epidemiology
Ear Diseases/prevention & control
Genetic Predisposition to Disease
Hearing Loss/epidemiology
Hearing Loss/etiology
Hearing Loss/therapy
Humans
Medical Illustration
Postoperative Complications/prevention & control
Prevalence
Radiation Injuries/complications
Radiation Injuries/prevention & control
Tinnitus/epidemiology
Tinnitus/etiology
Vertigo/epidemiology
Vertigo/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antineoplastic Agents)
[Em] Entry month:1703
[Cu] Class update date: 170303
[Lr] Last revision date:170303
[Js] Journal subset:AIM; IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160210
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/cncr.29779

  5 / 201 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26847826
[Au] Autor:Kuo CT; Lin YW; Tang NY; Cheng CY; Hsieh CL
[Ad] Address:Graduate Institute of Acupuncture Science, College of Chinese Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan.
[Ti] Title:Electric stimulation of the ears ameliorated learning and memory impairment in rats with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury.
[So] Source:Sci Rep;6:20381, 2016 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:2045-2322
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Ear acupuncture enhances the secretion of acetylcholine, which has anti-inflammatory effects. Here we want to investigate the effect of electric stimulation (ES) of the ears on learning and memory impairment in rats with cerebral ischemia-reperfusion injury. At 24 h after reperfusion, 2-Hz ES was applied to the ears for 20 min/day (10 min for each ear) for 7 days continuously. The step-through time of the passive avoidance test was greater in the ES group than in the control group (300.0 ± 0.0 s vs 45.0 ± 26.7 s, p < 0.05). Our results showed that neither neurological deficit score nor motor functions were improved after 2-Hz ES (4.0 ± 0 vs 4.5 ± 0.8, p > 0.05). The numbers of nicotinic acetylcholine receptor α4 positively stained cells in the CA2 and dentate gyrus of the hippocampus were 19.0 ± 11.5 and 269.2 ± 79.3, respectively, in the ES group, which were greater than those in the control group (7.0 ± 5.9 and 165.5 ± 30.8, respectively) (both p < 0.05). These results suggested that 2-Hz ES of the ears ameliorated learning and memory impairment in rats with ischemia-reperfusion injury. ES of the ears has neuroprotective effects, which are related to acetylcholine release.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Ear/physiology
Electric Stimulation
Maze Learning/physiology
Memory/physiology
Reperfusion Injury/pathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Antigens, Nuclear/metabolism
Disease Models, Animal
Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein/metabolism
Hippocampus/metabolism
Ki-67 Antigen/metabolism
Male
Microscopy, Fluorescence
Nerve Tissue Proteins/metabolism
Rats
Rats, Sprague-Dawley
Receptors, Nicotinic/metabolism
Reperfusion Injury/metabolism
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Antigens, Nuclear); 0 (Glial Fibrillary Acidic Protein); 0 (Ki-67 Antigen); 0 (Nerve Tissue Proteins); 0 (NeuN protein, rat); 0 (Receptors, Nicotinic); 0 (nicotinic acetylcholine receptor alpha4 subunit)
[Em] Entry month:1701
[Cu] Class update date: 170220
[Lr] Last revision date:170220
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:160206
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1038/srep20381

  6 / 201 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26470871
[Au] Autor:Shane Tubbs R; Hose N; Loukas M; De Caro R; Cohen-Gadol AA
[Ad] Address:Seattle Science Foundation, Seattle, WA, USA.
[Ti] Title:Neural connections between the nervus intermedius and the facial and vestibulocochlear nerves in the cerebellopontine angle: an anatomic study.
[So] Source:Surg Radiol Anat;38(5):619-23, 2016 Jul.
[Is] ISSN:1279-8517
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: Unexpected clinical outcomes following transection of single nerves of the internal acoustic meatus have been reported. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate interneural connections between the nervus intermedius and the adjacent nerves in the cerebellopontine angle. METHODS: On 100 cadaveric sides, dissections were made of the facial/vestibulocochlear complex in the cerebellopontine angle with special attention to the nervus intermedius and potential connections between this nerve and the adjacent facial or vestibulocochlear nerves. RESULTS: A nervus intermedius was identified on all but ten sides. Histologically confirmed neural connections were found between the nervus intermedius and either the facial or vestibulocochlear nerves on 34 % of sides. The mean diameter of these small interconnecting nerves was 0.1 mm. The fiber orientation of these nerves was usually oblique (anteromedial or posterolateral) in nature, but 13 connections traveled anteroposteriorly. Connecting fibers were single on 81 % of sides, doubled on 16 %, and tripled on 3 %, six sides had connections both with the facial nerve anteriorly and the vestibular nerves posteriorly. On 6.5 % of sides, a connection was between the nervus intermedius and cochlear nerve. For vestibular nerve connections with the nervus intermedius, 76 % were with the superior vestibular nerve and 24 % with the inferior vestibular nerve. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge of the possible neural interconnections found between the nervus intermedius and surrounding nerves may prove useful to surgeons who operate in these regions so that inadvertent traction or transection is avoided. Additionally, unanticipated clinical presentations and exams following surgery may be due to such neural interconnections.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cerebellopontine Angle/anatomy & histology
Facial Nerve/anatomy & histology
Neural Pathways/anatomy & histology
Temporal Bone/innervation
Vestibulocochlear Nerve/anatomy & histology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Anatomic Variation
Cadaver
Cerebellopontine Angle/surgery
Dissection
Facial Nerve/surgery
Female
Humans
Intraoperative Complications/prevention & control
Male
Microsurgery/adverse effects
Middle Aged
Neurosurgical Procedures
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1704
[Cu] Class update date: 170926
[Lr] Last revision date:170926
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:151017
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00276-015-1571-z

  7 / 201 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 26209185
[Au] Autor:Pfingst BE; Hughes AP; Colesa DJ; Watts MM; Strahl SB; Raphael Y
[Ad] Address:Kresge Hearing Research Institute, Department of Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI, USA. Electronic address: bpfingst@umich.edu.
[Ti] Title:Insertion trauma and recovery of function after cochlear implantation: Evidence from objective functional measures.
[So] Source:Hear Res;330(Pt A):98-105, 2015 Dec.
[Is] ISSN:1878-5891
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Partial loss and subsequent recovery of cochlear implant function in the first few weeks following cochlear implant surgery has been observed in previous studies using psychophysical detection thresholds. In the current study, we explored this putative manifestation of insertion trauma using objective functional measures: electrically-evoked compound action potential (ECAP) amplitude-growth functions (ECAP amplitude as a function of stimulus level). In guinea pigs implanted in a hearing ear with good post-implant hearing and good spiral ganglion neuron (SGN) survival, consistent patterns of ECAP functions were observed. The slopes of ECAP growth functions were moderately steep on the day of implant insertion, decreased to low levels over the first few days after implantation and then increased slowly over several weeks to reach a relatively stable level. In parallel, ECAP thresholds increased over time after implantation and then recovered, although more quickly, to a relatively stable low level as did thresholds for eliciting a facial twitch. Similar results were obtained in animals deafened but treated with an adenovirus with a neurotrophin gene insert that resulted in good SGN preservation. In contrast, in animals implanted in deaf ears that had relatively poor SGN survival, ECAP slopes reached low levels within a few days after implantation and remained low. These results are consistent with the idea that steep ECAP growth functions require a healthy population of auditory nerve fibers and that cochlear implant insertion trauma can temporarily impair the function of a healthy SGN population.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Cochlear Implantation/adverse effects
Cochlear Implantation/methods
Cochlear Implants
Cochlear Nerve/physiology
Ear/injuries
Spiral Ganglion/physiology
Wounds and Injuries/physiopathology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Acoustics
Action Potentials
Animals
Auditory Threshold
Cochlea/physiology
Electric Stimulation
Evoked Potentials, Auditory/physiology
Guinea Pigs
Hearing/physiology
Immunohistochemistry
Male
Neurons/physiology
Prostheses and Implants
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1610
[Cu] Class update date: 161230
[Lr] Last revision date:161230
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:150726
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  8 / 201 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 25280052
[Au] Autor:Iseli CE; Merwin WH; Klatt-Cromwell C; Hutson KA; Ewend MG; Adunka OF; Fitzpatrick DC; Buchman CA
[Ad] Address:Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, U.S.A.
[Ti] Title:Effect of cochlear nerve electrocautery on the adult cochlear nucleus.
[So] Source:Otol Neurotol;36(4):670-7, 2015 Apr.
[Is] ISSN:1537-4505
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:HYPOTHESIS: Electrocauterization and subsequent transection of the cochlear nerve induce greater injury to the cochlear nucleus than sharp transection alone. BACKGROUND: Some studies show that neurofibromatosis Type 2 (NF2) patients fit with auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) fail to achieve speech perception abilities similar to ABI recipients without NF2. Reasons for these differences remain speculative. One hypothesis posits poorer performance to surgically induced trauma to the cochlear nucleus from electrocautery. Sustained electrosurgical depolarization of the cochlear nerve may cause excitotoxic-induced postsynaptic nuclear injury. Equally plausible is that cautery in the vicinity of the cochlear nucleus induces necrosis. METHODS: The cochlear nerve was transected in anesthetized adult gerbils sharply with or without bipolar electrocautery at varying intensities. Gerbils were perfused at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days postoperatively; their brainstem and cochleas were embedded in paraffin and sectioned at 10 µm. Alternate sections were stained with flourescent markers for neuronal injury or Nissl substance. In additional experiments, anterograde tracers were applied directly to a sectioned eighth nerve to verify that fluorescent-labeled profiles seen were terminating auditory nerve fibers. RESULTS: Cochlear nerve injury was observed from 72 hours postoperatively and was identical across cases regardless of surgical technique. Postsynaptic cochlear nucleus injury was not seen after distal transection of the nerve. By contrast, proximal transection was associated with trauma to the cochlear nucleus. CONCLUSION: Distal application of bipolar electrocautery seems safe for the cochlear nucleus. Application near the root entry zone must be used cautiously because this may compromise nuclear viability needed to support ABI stimulation.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Auditory Brain Stem Implantation
Cochlear Nerve/surgery
Cochlear Nucleus/pathology
Electrocoagulation/adverse effects
Electrocoagulation/methods
Vestibulocochlear Nerve Injuries/complications
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Animals
Auditory Brain Stem Implantation/adverse effects
Auditory Brain Stem Implantation/methods
Auditory Brain Stem Implants
Cochlear Nerve/injuries
Disease Models, Animal
Gerbillinae
Male
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1509
[Cu] Class update date: 150313
[Lr] Last revision date:150313
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:141004
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1097/MAO.0000000000000588

  9 / 201 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24343775
[Au] Autor:Hendrix P; Griessenauer CJ; Foreman P; Loukas M; Fisher WS; Rizk E; Shoja MM; Tubbs RS
[Ad] Address:Division of Neurosurgery, Department of Surgery, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama.
[Ti] Title:Arterial supply of the lower cranial nerves: a comprehensive review.
[So] Source:Clin Anat;27(1):108-17, 2014 Jan.
[Is] ISSN:1098-2353
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The lower cranial nerves receive their arterial supply from an intricate network of tributaries derived from the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories. A contemporary, comprehensive literature review of the vascular supply of the lower cranial nerves was performed. The vascular supply to the trigeminal, facial, vestibulocochlear, glossopharyngeal, vagus, spinal accessory, and hypoglossal nerves are illustrated with a special emphasis on clinical issues. Frequently the external carotid, internal carotid, and vertebrobasilar territories all contribute to the vascular supply of an individual cranial nerve along its course. Understanding of the vasculature of the lower cranial nerves is of great relevance for skull base surgery.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Basilar Artery/anatomy & histology
Carotid Artery, External/anatomy & histology
Carotid Artery, Internal/anatomy & histology
Cranial Nerves/blood supply
Vertebral Artery/anatomy & histology
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Cranial Nerve Injuries/etiology
Humans
Nerve Compression Syndromes/etiology
Skull Base/anatomy & histology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1409
[Cu] Class update date: 131217
[Lr] Last revision date:131217
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131218
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1002/ca.22318

  10 / 201 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 24306235
[Au] Autor:Ying T; Thirumala P; Chang Y; Habeych M; Crammond D; Balzer J
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurological Surgery, Xinhua Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, China.
[Ti] Title:Emprical factors associated with Brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring during microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm and its correlation to hearing loss.
[So] Source:Acta Neurochir (Wien);156(3):571-5, 2014 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:0942-0940
[Cp] Country of publication:Austria
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Cranial nerve VIII is at risk during microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS). The primary aim of this study is to evaluate the empirical factors associated with brainstem auditory evoked potential monitoring and its correlation to post operative hearing loss (HL) after MVD for HFS. METHODS: Pre-operative and post-operative audiogram data and BAEP from ninety-four patients who underwent MVD for HFS were analyzed. Pure tone audiometry (PTA) and Speech Discrimination Score (SDS) were performed on all patients before and after surgery. Intraoperative neurophysiological data were reviewed independently. HL was assessed using the AAO-HNS classification system for non-serviceable hearing loss (Class C/D), defined as PTA >50 dB and/or SDS <50% within the speech range of frequencies. RESULTS: Patients with HL had higher rates of loss in the amplitude of wave V and prolongation in the interpeak latency of peak I-V latency during MVD. Gender, age, side, and MVD duration did not increase the risk of HL. There was no correlation between successive number of BAEP changes (reflective of the number of surgical attempts) and HL. There was no association between the speed of recovery of BAEPs and HL. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with new post-operative HL have a faster rate of change in the amplitude of wave V and the interpeak I-V latency during intraoperative BAEP monitoring for HFS. Our alarm criteria to inform the surgeon about impending nerve injury might have to be modified and prospectively tested to prevent rapid change in BAEPs.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Evoked Potentials, Auditory, Brain Stem
Hearing Loss/prevention & control
Hemifacial Spasm/surgery
Microvascular Decompression Surgery/methods
Monitoring, Intraoperative/methods
Vestibulocochlear Nerve Injuries/diagnosis
Vestibulocochlear Nerve Injuries/prevention & control
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Audiometry, Pure-Tone
Deafness/diagnosis
Deafness/prevention & control
Female
Hearing Loss/diagnosis
Humans
Intraoperative Complications/diagnosis
Intraoperative Complications/etiology
Intraoperative Complications/prevention & control
Male
Microvascular Decompression Surgery/adverse effects
Middle Aged
Retrospective Studies
Vestibulocochlear Nerve Injuries/etiology
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1501
[Cu] Class update date: 140213
[Lr] Last revision date:140213
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:131206
[St] Status:MEDLINE
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00701-013-1957-9


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