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[PMID]: 29287221
[Au] Autor:Walsh AS; Sinclair V; Watmough P; Henderson AA
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Royal Bolton Hospital, Minerva Road, Bolton, BL4 0JR, United Kingdom. Electronic address: Annawalsh@nhs.net.
[Ti] Title:Ankle fractures: Getting it right first time.
[So] Source:Foot (Edinb);34:48-52, 2017 Nov 28.
[Is] ISSN:1532-2963
[Cp] Country of publication:Scotland
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Ankle fractures are common injuries presenting to trauma departments and ankle open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF ) is one of the first procedures targeted in early orthopaedic training. Failure to address the fracture pattern with the appropriate surgical technique and hardware may lead to early failure, resulting in revision procedures or premature degenerative change. Patients undergoing revision ORIF are known to be at much greater risk of complications and many of these secondary procedures may be preventable. METHOD: A retrospective analysis of all patients attending our unit for ankle ORIF over a two year period was undertaken. Patients were identified from our Bluespier database and a review of x-rays was undertaken. All patients undergoing re-operation within eight weeks of the primary procedure were studied. The cause of primary failure was established and potential contributing patient and surgical factors were recorded. RESULTS: 236 patients undergoing ankle ORIF were identified. 13 patients (5.5%) returned to theatre for a secondary procedure within eight weeks. Within this group, seven (54%) patients returned for treatment of a neglected or under treated syndesmotic injury, three (23%) for complete failure of fixation, two (15%) with wound problems and one (8%) for medial malleolus mal-reduction. Of the patient group, five (39%) were known type 2 diabetics. Consultants performed two (15%) procedures, supervised registrars five (39%) and unsupervised registrars six (46%) operations. CONCLUSION: Errors are being made at all levels of training in applying basic principles such as restoring fibula length and screening the syndesmosis intra-operatively. Appropriate placement and selection of hardware is not always being deployed in osteopenic bone resulting in premature failure of fixation and fracture patterns are not being fully appreciated. Patients are undergoing preventable secondary procedures in the operative treatment of ankle fractures.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher

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[PMID]: 29523928
[Au] Autor:Shi L; Feng L; Liu Y; Duan JQ; Lin WP; Zhang JF; Li G
[Ad] Address:Department of Orthopaedics & Traumatology, Li Ka Shing Institute of Health Sciences and Lui Che Woo Institute of Innovative Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Prince of Wales Hospital, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, Shatin, Hong Kong SAR, People's Republic of China.
[Ti] Title:MicroRNA-218 Promotes Osteogenic Differentiation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Accelerates Bone Fracture Healing.
[So] Source:Calcif Tissue Int;, 2018 Mar 09.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0827
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:As a regulator of osteogenesis, microRNA-218 (miR-218) is reported to promote osteogenesis of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). However, the in vivo osteogenic effect of miR-218 remains elusive. In this study, miR-218 was confirmed to promote osteogenic differentiation of MSCs by stimulating the alkaline phosphatase activity, calcium nodule formation, and osteogenic marker gene expression. For in vivo study, the miR-218-overexpressing BMSCs were locally administrated into the fracture sites in a femur fracture mouse model. Based on the X-rays, micro-computed tomography, mechanical testing, histology, and immunohistochemistry examinations, miR-218 overexpression improved new bone formation and accelerated fracture healing. These findings suggest that miR-218 may be a promising therapeutic target for bone repair in future clinical applications.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180310
[Lr] Last revision date:180310
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00223-018-0410-8

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[PMID]: 28450244
[Au] Autor:El-Naggar AWM; Senna MM; Mostafa TA; Helal RH
[Ad] Address:Radiation Chemistry Department, National Center for Radiation Research and Technology, Nasr City, Atomic Energy Authority, Cairo, Egypt. Electronic address: ab_nagga@yahoo.com.
[Ti] Title:Radiation synthesis and drug delivery properties of interpenetrating networks (IPNs) based on poly(vinyl alcohol)/ methylcellulose blend hydrogels.
[So] Source:Int J Biol Macromol;102:1045-1051, 2017 Sep.
[Is] ISSN:1879-0003
[Cp] Country of publication:Netherlands
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Gamma radiation was used to prepare blend hydrogels from poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and low ratios of methylcellulose (MC). The structure-property behavior was characterized by IR spectroscopy, gel fraction, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and swelling at room temperature and different pH values. The PVA/MC hydrogels were used as a carrier for doxycycline hyclate (DOX-h) drug. The results showed that the gel fraction of PVA/MC hydrogels decreased greatly with increasing the ratio of MC in the initial feeding solution. The PVA/MC hydrogels displayed pH-sensitive swelling character. The drug uptake-release study indicated that PVA/MC hydrogels possessed controlled release behavior and that the release process depends on pH. In this respect, the release of DOX-h drug was significant in alkaline medium.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Drug Carriers/chemistry
Drug Carriers/chemical synthesis
Hydrogels/chemistry
Hydrogels/chemical synthesis
Methylcellulose/chemistry
Polyvinyl Alcohol/chemistry
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Chemistry Techniques, Synthetic
Doxycycline/chemistry
Drug Liberation
Gamma Rays
Hydrogen-Ion Concentration
Radiochemistry
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Nm] Name of substance:0 (Drug Carriers); 0 (Hydrogels); 9002-89-5 (Polyvinyl Alcohol); 9004-67-5 (Methylcellulose); N12000U13O (Doxycycline)
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[Js] Journal subset:IM
[Da] Date of entry for processing:170429
[St] Status:MEDLINE

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[PMID]: 29519741
[Au] Autor:Kumar B; Strouse J; Swee M; Lenert P; Suneja M
[Ad] Address:Division of Immunology, Department of Internal Medicine, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52242. Electronic address: Bharat-Kumar@UIowa.edu.
[Ti] Title:Hydralazine-associated vasculitis: Overlapping features of drug-induced lupus and vasculitis.
[So] Source:Semin Arthritis Rheum;, 2018 Jan 12.
[Is] ISSN:1532-866X
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Hydralazine is an antihypertensive medication that has been associated with drug-induced lupus erythematosus (DIL) as well as ANCA-associated vasculitis (AAV). Although rare, early diagnosis is critical since drug cessation is the mainstay of therapy. This retrospective study aims to characterize the clinical, laboratory, and histopathologic features of this disease. METHODS: Once approval was obtained from the Institutional Review Board at the University of Iowa, all patients carrying a diagnosis of vasculitis (ICD9 code: 447.6 or ICD10 code: I77.6, I80, L95, M30, or M31) and positive ANCA lab results over the past 15 years were identified. Age, gender, comorbid conditions, medications taken over the prior 6 months, laboratory data, including electrolytes, urine studies and serologies, chest x-rays, CT scans, and pathologic biopsy records were abstracted from the electronic medical record. RESULTS: 323 cases of AAV were identified, of which 12 were exposed to hydralazine, all at the time of diagnosis. The average duration of hydralazine therapy was 22 months and mean cumulative dose was 146g. Patients were typically older (70.3 years old) with slight female preponderance (7 females). Eleven patients presented with dyspnea, fatigue, and unintentional weight loss. Five had polyarthralgias and 8 had lower extremity petechiae. All 12 patients were both ANA and ANCA positive. ANA titers ranged from 1:160 and 1:2560. Ten were of diffuse pattern while 2 were nucleolar. ANCA titers ranged from 1:320 to 1:2560. Eleven had a pANCA pattern while one had cANCA. All 12 patients were positive for histone and 11 were positive for myeloperoxidase antibodies. Eleven also had dsDNA antibodies, and 4 had anti-cardiolipin IgG or IgM antibodies. Nine patients were also hypocomplementemic (mean C3 level: 88.4mg/dL; mean C4 level: 16.5mg/dL). All patients had variable levels of proteinuria (1+ to 3+) and eleven had active urine sediment. Urine protein:creatinine ratios ranged from 0.2 to 1.7. Of the 6 patients who underwent kidney biopsy, all 6 showed pauci-immune crescentic glomerulonephritis. Seven patients had bilateral pulmonary interstitial infiltrates and four had pleural effusions on CT scan. Four had pericardial effusions as demonstrated by echocardiography. CONCLUSIONS: Hydralazine-associated vasculitis is a drug-associated autoimmune syndrome that presents with interstitial lung disease, hypocomplementemia, and pauci-immune glomerulonephritis. Patients have elements of both DIL and DIV, as manifested by high ANA and ANCA titers as well as the presence of histone and MPO antibodies. Further research is needed to understand the etiopathogenesis of this condition.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher

  5 / 345705 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29518207
[Au] Autor:Shi L; Tashiro S
[Ad] Address:Department of Cellular Biology, Research Institute for Radiation Biology Medicine, Hiroshima University, Kasumi 1-2-3, Minamiku, Hiroshima 734-8553, Japan.
[Ti] Title:Estimation of the effects of medical diagnostic radiation exposure based on DNA damage.
[So] Source:J Radiat Res;, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1349-9157
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:X-rays are widely applied in the medical field for the diagnosis and treatment of diseases. Among the uses of X-rays in diagnosis, computed tomography (CT) has been established as one of the most informative diagnostic radiology examinations. Moreover, recent advances in CT scan technology have made this examination much easier and more informative and increased its application, especially in Japan. However, the radiation dose of CT scans is higher than that of simple X-ray examinations. Therefore, the health risk of a CT scan has been discussed in various studies, but is still controversial. Consequently, the biological and cytogenetic effects of CT scans are being analyzed. Here, we summarize the recent findings concerning the biological and cytogenetic effects of ionizing radiation from a CT scan, by focusing on DNA damage and chromosome aberrations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/jrr/rry006

  6 / 345705 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29503983
[Au] Autor:Yoda Y; Okada K; Wang H; Cramer SP; Seto M
[Ad] Address:Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute/SPring-8, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo-cho, Sayo-gun, Hyogo, 679-5198, Japan.
[Ti] Title:High-resolution monochromator for iron nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of biological samples.
[So] Source:Jpn J Appl Phys Pt 1;55(12), 2016 Dec.
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:A new high-resolution monochromator for 14.4-keV X-rays has been designed and developed for the Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy of biological samples. Higher flux and stability are especially important for measuring biological samples, because of the very weak signals produced due to the low concentrations of Fe-57. A 24% increase in flux while maintaining a high resolution below 0.9 meV is achieved in the calculation by adopting an asymmetric reflection of Ge, which is used as the first crystal of the three-bounce high-resolution monochromator. The small cost resulting from a 20% increase of the exit beam size is acceptable to our biological applications. The higher throughput of the new design has been experimentally verified. A fine rotation mechanics that that combines a weak-link hinge with a piezoelectric actuator was used for controlling the photon energy of the monochromatic beam. The resulting stability is sufficient to preserve the intrinsic resolution.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review

  7 / 345705 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29394528
[Au] Autor:Mattana E; Sacande M; Bradamante G; Gomez-Barreiro P; Sanogo S; Ulian T
[Ad] Address:Natural Capital and Plant Health Department, Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Ardingly, UK.
[Ti] Title:Understanding biological and ecological factors affecting seed germination of the multipurpose tree Anogeissus leiocarpa.
[So] Source:Plant Biol (Stuttg);, 2018 Feb 02.
[Is] ISSN:1438-8677
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Anogeissus leiocarpa (DC.) Guill. & Perr. (Combretaceae) has important economic and cultural value in West Africa as source of wood, dye and medicine. Although this tree is in high demand by local communities, its planting remains limited due to its very low propagation via seed. In this study, X-rays were used to select filled fruits in order to characterise their morphology and seed germination responses to treatment with sulphuric acid and different incubation temperatures. Morphological observations highlighted a straight orthotropous seed structure. The increase in mass detected for both intact and scarified fruits through imbibition tests, as well as morphological observations of fruits soaked in methylene blue solution, confirmed that they are water-permeable, although acid-scarified fruits reached significantly higher mass increment values than intact ones. Acid scarification (10 min soaking in 98% H SO ) positively affected seed germination rate but not final germination proportions. When intact fruits where incubated at a range of temperatures, no seeds germinated at 10 °C, while maximum seed germination (ca. 80%) was reached at 20 °C. T values ranged from a minimum of ca. 12 days at 25 °C to a maximum of ca. 34 days at 15 and 35 °C. A theoretical base temperature for germination (T ) of ca. 10 °C and a thermal requirement for 50% germination (S) of ca. 195 °Cd were also identified for intact fruits. The results of this study revealed the seed germination characteristics driven by fruit and seed morphology of this species, which will help in its wider propagation in plantations.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/plb.12702

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[PMID]: 29332238
[Au] Autor:Hey HWD; Tan KLM; Moorthy V; Lau ET; Lau LL; Liu G; Wong HK
[Ad] Address:University Orthopaedics, Hand and Reconstructive Microsurgery (UOHC), National University Health System, 1E Kent Ridge Road, NUHS Tower Block Level 11, Singapore, 119228, Singapore. dennis_hey@nuhs.edu.sg.
[Ti] Title:Normal variation in sagittal spinal alignment parameters in adult patients: an EOS study using serial imaging.
[So] Source:Eur Spine J;27(3):578-584, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1432-0932
[Cp] Country of publication:Germany
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:PURPOSE: To describe normal variations in sagittal spinal radiographic parameters over an interval period and establish physiological norms and guidelines for which these images should be interpreted. METHODS: Data were prospectively collected from a continuous series of adult patients with first-episode mild low back pain presenting to a single institution. The sagittal parameters of two serial radiographic images taken 6-months apart were obtained with the EOS slot scanner. Measured parameters include CL, TK, TL, LL, PI, PT, SS, and end and apical vertebrae. Chi-squared test and Wilcoxon Signed Rank test were used to compare categorical and continuous variables, respectively. RESULTS: Sixty patients with a total of 120 whole-body sagittal X-rays were analysed. Mean age was 52.1 years (SD 21.2). Mean interval between the first and second X-rays was 126.2 days (SD 47.2). Small variations (< 1°) occur for all except PT (1.2°), CL (1.2°), and SVA (2.9 cm). Pelvic tilt showed significant difference between two images (p = 0.035). Subgroup analysis based on the time interval between X-rays, and between the first and second X-rays, did not show significant differences. Consistent findings were found for end and apical vertebrae of the thoracic and lumbar spine between the first and second X-rays for sagittal curve shapes. CONCLUSIONS: Radiographic sagittal parameters vary between serial images and reflect dynamism in spinal balancing. SVA and PT are predisposed to the widest variation. SVA has the largest variation between individuals of low pelvic tilt. Therefore, interpretation of these parameters should be patient specific and relies on trends rather than a one-time assessment.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1007/s00586-017-5459-y

  9 / 345705 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29302687
[Au] Autor:de Boer M; van Leeuwen FE; Hauptmann M; Overbeek LIH; de Boer JP; Hijmering NJ; Sernee A; Klazen CAH; Lobbes MBI; van der Hulst RRWJ; Rakhorst HA; de Jong D
[Ad] Address:Plastic, Reconstructive and Hand-Surgery, Maastricht University Medical Centre, School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht, the Netherlands.
[Ti] Title:Breast Implants and the Risk of Anaplastic Large-Cell Lymphoma in the Breast.
[So] Source:JAMA Oncol;4(3):335-341, 2018 Mar 01.
[Is] ISSN:2374-2445
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Importance: Breast implants are among the most commonly used medical devices. Since 2008, the number of women with breast implants diagnosed with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma in the breast (breast-ALCL) has increased, and several reports have suggested an association between breast implants and risk of breast-ALCL. However, relative and absolute risks of breast-ALCL in women with implants are still unknown, precluding evidence-based counseling about implants. Objective: To determine relative and absolute risks of breast-ALCL in women with breast implants. Design, Setting, and Participants: Through the population-based nationwide Dutch pathology registry we identified all patients diagnosed with primary non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the breast between 1990 and 2016 and retrieved clinical data, including breast implant status, from the treating physicians. We estimated the odds ratio (OR) of ALCL associated with breast implants in a case-control design, comparing implant prevalence between women with breast-ALCL and women with other types of breast lymphoma. Cumulative risk of breast-ALCL was derived from the age-specific prevalence of breast implants in Dutch women, estimated from an examination of 3000 chest x-rays and time trends from implant sales. Main Outcomes and Measures: Relative and absolute risks of breast-ALCL in women with breast implants. Results: Among 43 patients with breast-ALCL (median age, 59 years), 32 had ipsilateral breast implants, compared with 1 among 146 women with other primary breast lymphomas (OR, 421.8; 95% CI, 52.6-3385.2). Implants among breast-ALCL cases were more often macrotextured (23 macrotextured of 28 total implants of known type, 82%) than expected (49 193 sold macrotextured implants of total sold 109 449 between 2010 and 2015, 45%) based on sales data (P < .001). The estimated prevalence of breast implants in women aged 20 to 70 years was 3.3%. Cumulative risks of breast-ALCL in women with implants were 29 per million at 50 years and 82 per million at 70 years. The number of women with implants needed to cause 1 breast-ALCL case before age 75 years was 6920. Conclusions and Relevance: Breast implants are associated with increased risk of breast-ALCL, but the absolute risk remains small. Our results emphasize the need for increased awareness among the public, medical professionals, and regulatory bodies, promotion of alternative cosmetic procedures, and alertness to signs and symptoms of breast-ALCL in women with implants.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1801
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1001/jamaoncol.2017.4510

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[PMID]: 29517674
[Au] Autor:Martins P; Ferreira CS; Cunha-Melo JR; Professor Emeritus of Surgery
[Ad] Address:Department of Surgery.
[Ti] Title:Esophageal transit time in patients with chagasic megaesophagus: Lack of linear correlation between dysphagia and grade of dilatation.
[So] Source:Medicine (Baltimore);97(10):e0084, 2018 Mar.
[Is] ISSN:1536-5964
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:The aim of this study was to determine the esophageal transit time in control individuals and in chagasic patients with or without megaesophagus.A total of 148 patients were allocated in 6 groups according to serological diagnostic of Chagas disease and the degree of esophageal dilatation: A, control healthy individuals (n = 34, 22.9%); B, indeterminate form (n = 23, 15.5%); C, megaesophagus I (n = 37, 25.0%); D, megaesophagus II (n = 19, 12.8%); E, megaesophagus III (n = 21, 14.2%); and F, megaesophagus IV (n = 14, 9.5%). After 8-hour fasting, patients were asked to swallow 75 mL of barium sulfate solution. x-Rays were obtained after 8, 30, 60, and 90 seconds, 5, 10, 30, 60, and 90 minutes, 2, 6, 12, 24 hours, and at every 12 hours until no more contrast was seen in the esophagus. This was the transit time.The transit time varied from 8 seconds to 36 hours (median = 90 seconds). A linear correlation was observed between transit time and megaesophagus grade: 8 seconds in groups A and B, 5 minutes in C, 30 minutes in D, 2 hours in E, and 9:15 hours in F. Dysphagia was not reported by 60 of 114 (52.6%) patients with positive serological tests for Chagas disease (37/91-40.7%-of patients with megaesophagus I-IV grades). The esophageal transit time increased with the grade of megaesophagus.The esophageal transit time has a direct correlation with the grade of megaesophagus; dysphagia complaint correlates with the grade of megaesophagus. However, many patients with megaesophagus do not report dysphagia.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1097/MD.0000000000010084


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