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[PMID]: 29510704
[Au] Autor:Grensman A; Acharya BD; Wändell P; Nilsson GH; Falkenberg T; Sundin Ö; Werner S
[Ad] Address:Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Family Medicine and Primary Care, Karolinska Institutet, Alfred Nobels allé 23, 141 83, Stockholm, Sweden. astrid.grensman@ki.se.
[Ti] Title:Effect of traditional yoga, mindfulness-based cognitive therapy, and cognitive behavioral therapy, on health related quality of life: a randomized controlled trial on patients on sick leave because of burnout.
[So] Source:BMC Complement Altern Med;18(1):80, 2018 Mar 06.
[Is] ISSN:1472-6882
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: To explore if health related quality of life(HRQoL) increased after traditional yoga(TY), mindfulness based cognitive therapy(MBCT), or cognitive behavioral therapy(CBT), in patients on sick leave because of burnout. METHODS: Randomized controlled trial, blinded, in ninety-four primary health care patients, block randomized to TY, MBCT or CBT (active control) between September 2007 and November 2009. Patients were living in the Stockholm metropolitan area, Sweden, were aged 18-65 years and were on 50%-100% sick leave. A group treatment for 20 weeks, three hours per week, with homework four hours per week. HRQoL was measured by the SWED-QUAL questionnaire, comprising 67 items grouped into 13 subscales, each with a separate index, and scores from 0 (worse) to 100 (best). SWED-QUAL covers aspects of physical and emotional well-being, cognitive function, sleep, general health and social and sexual functioning. Statistics: Wilcoxon's rank sum and Wilcoxon's sign rank tests, Bonett-Price for medians and confidence intervals, and Cohen's D. RESULTS: Twenty-six patients in the TY (21 women), and 27 patients in both the MBCT (24 women) and in the CBT (25 women), were analyzed. Ten subscales in TY and seven subscales in MBCT and CBT showed improvements, p < 0.05, in several of the main domains affected in burnout, e.g. emotional well-being, physical well-being, cognitive function and sleep. The median improvement ranged from 0 to 27 points in TY, from 4 to 25 points in CBT and from 0 to 25 points in MBCT. The effect size was mainly medium or large. Comparison of treatments showed no statistical differences, but better effect (small) of both TY and MBCT compared to CBT. When comparing the effect of TY and MBCT, both showed a better effect (small) in two subscales each. CONCLUSIONS: A 20 week group treatment with TY, CBT or MBCT had equal effects on HRQoL, and particularly on main domains affected in burnout. This indicates that TY, MBCT and CBT can be used as both treatment and prevention, to improve HRQoL in patients on sick leave because of burnout, reducing the risk of future morbidity. TRIAL REGISTRATION: July 22, 2012, retrospectively registered. ClinicalTrails.gov NCT01168661 . FUNDING: Stockholm County Council, grant 2003-5.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180311
[Lr] Last revision date:180311
[Cl] Clinical Trial:ClinicalTrial
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.1186/s12906-018-2141-9

  2 / 4190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29522669
[Au] Autor:Ciosek Z; Rusnarczyk D; Szylinska A; Kot K; Mosiejczuk H; Rotter I
[Ti] Title:[Is training yoga regulary can have an effective impact on dealing with stress?].
[So] Source:Pomeranian J Life Sci;61(4):454-9, 2015.
[Is] ISSN:2450-4637
[Cp] Country of publication:Poland
[La] Language:pol
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: The word yoga (Goya) is derived from the Sanskrit yii and means: bind, connect, attach and focus attention on something. It also means connection, and the union. The system of yoga has collected and systematized Patanjali in his "Yoga Sittrach" work. Yoga has the task of shaping proper physical culture and spirit (mind), regardless of religious beliefs, national origin, membership in a social group. The aim of the study was to evaluate the relationship between yoga and regular coaching strategy for coping with stress, blood pressure and abdominal obesity. Material and methods: The study involved 100 people divided into 2 groups. The first group comprised students regularly practicing yoga. The second group were randomly selected subjects not regularly engaged in sport. The age of the subjects ranged 18­60 years and over. Research material was gathered using a questionnaire designed by the authors, and the mini -COPE test. In addition, blood pressure and waist circumference were measured to assess the prevalence of abdominal obesity. Results: Among people who practice yoga the average waist circumference was 82.8 ±8 in women and 90.3 ±11 in men (p < 0.034). A healthy waistline was found in 43 (86%)subjects in the yoga group, and 34 (68%) subjects in the control group. Body mass index (BMI) also falls in favour of yoga, and in this group 15 (30%) more subjects had normal BMI. Abdominal obesity and BMI indicating obesity was found in 10 (20%) subjects from the yoga group and 15 (30%) from the control group. The study revealed no significant differences in mean blood pressure between the analysed groups. Conclusions: Based on the analysis of the questionnaire mini-COPE people regularly Training Yoga choose more effective strategies for coping with stress. Regular practice of yoga is a factor in reducing abdominal obesity. Men who trains yoga have blood pressure lower than those who doesn't practice any sport.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180309
[Lr] Last revision date:180309
[St] Status:In-Process

  3 / 4190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29415222
[Au] Autor:Cushing RE; Braun KL; Alden C-Iayt SW; Katz AR
[Ad] Address:1st Infantry Division, Attn. DIV SURG Office Bld. 580, 1st Division Rd., Fort Riley, KS 66442.
[Ti] Title:Military-Tailored Yoga for Veterans with Post-traumatic Stress Disorder.
[So] Source:Mil Med;, 2018 Feb 05.
[Is] ISSN:1930-613X
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Introduction: Among veterans of post-9/11 conflicts, estimates of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) range from 9% shortly after returning from deployment to 31% a year after deployment. Clinical and pharmaceutically based treatments are underutilized. This could be due to concerns related to lost duty days, as well as PTSD patients' fears of stigma of having a mental health condition. Yoga has been shown to reduce PTSD symptoms in the civilian population, but few studies have tested the impact of yoga on veterans of post-9/11 conflicts. The purpose of this study is to test the impact of yoga on post-9/11 veterans diagnosed with PTSD. Materials and Methods: Participants were 18 yr of age or older and veterans of post-9/11 conflicts. They had subthreshold or diagnostic-level PTSD related to their combat military service, as determined by a score of 30 or higher on the PTSD Checklist-Military version (PCL-M). Veterans participated in 60-min weekly yoga sessions for 6 wk taught by a Warriors at Ease-trained yoga instructor who is a, post-9/11 veteran. The yoga sessions incorporated Vinyasa-style yoga and a trauma-sensitive, military-culture informed approach advocated by two separate organizations: Warriors at Ease and Meghan's Foundation. Data were collected at baseline and again after 7 wk. The primary outcome was PCL-M score. Participants also completed the Patient Health Questionnaire, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index, and the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale at both time points. Results: Eighteen Operation Enduring Freedom, Operation Iraqi Freedom, and Operation New Dawn veterans completed the pre- and post-intervention self-report questionnaires. Age ranged from 26 to 62 yr (median = 43 yr), length of service ranged from 2 to 34 yr (median = 18.8 yr), and 13 (72.2%) had completed college. Decreased PTSD symptomatology was demonstrated in the three-symptom clusters represented in the PCL-M (i.e., hyperarousal, re-experiencing, and avoidance). In addition, the total score on the PCL-M decreased significantly, by both statistical and clinical measures. The participants also demonstrated improved mindfulness scores and reported decreased insomnia, depression, and anxiety symptoms. Conclusion: This study demonstrates that a trauma-sensitive yoga intervention may be effective for veterans with PTSD symptoms, whether as stand-alone or adjunctive therapy. The impressive decrease in PTSD symptomatology may be due to the tailored military-specific nature of this intervention and the fact that it was led by a veteran of post-9/11 conflicts. More research is needed with a larger sample and a more diverse veteran population.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1093/milmed/usx071

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[PMID]: 29202204
[Au] Autor:Hartfiel N; Clarke G; Havenhand J; Phillips C; Edwards RT
[Ad] Address:Centre for Health Economics and Medicines Evaluation, Bangor University, Bangor, Wales.
[Ti] Title:Cost-effectiveness of yoga for managing musculoskeletal conditions in the workplace.
[So] Source:Occup Med (Lond);67(9):687-695, 2017 Dec 30.
[Is] ISSN:1471-8405
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:Background: Back pain and musculoskeletal conditions negatively affect the health-related quality of life (HRQL) of employees and generate substantial costs to employers. Aims: To assess the cost-effectiveness of yoga for managing musculoskeletal conditions. Methods: A randomized controlled trial evaluated an 8-week yoga programme, with a 6-month follow-up, for National Health Service (NHS) employees. Effectiveness in managing musculoskeletal conditions was assessed using repeated-measures generalized linear modelling for the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RDQ) and the Keele STarT Back Screening Tool. Cost-effectiveness was determined using area-under-the-curve linear regression for assessing HRQL from healthcare and societal perspectives. The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) was also calculated. Sickness absence was measured using electronic staff records at 6 months. Results: There were 151 participants. At 6 months, mean differences between groups favouring yoga were observed for RDQ [-0.63 (95% CI, -1.78, 0.48)], Keele STarT [-0.28 (95% CI, -0.97, 0.07)] and HRQL (0.016 QALY gain). From a healthcare perspective, yoga yielded an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £2103 per QALY. Given a willingness to pay for an additional QALY of £20 000, the probability of yoga being cost-effective was 95%. From a societal perspective, yoga was the dominant treatment compared with usual care. At 6 months, electronic staff records showed that yoga participants missed a total of 2 working days due to musculoskeletal conditions compared with 43 days for usual care participants. Conclusions: Yoga for NHS employees may enhance HRQL, reduce disability associated with back pain, lower sickness absence due to musculoskeletal conditions and is likely to be cost-effective.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1712
[Cu] Class update date: 180308
[Lr] Last revision date:180308
[St] Status:In-Data-Review
[do] DOI:10.1093/occmed/kqx161

  5 / 4190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29512839
[Au] Autor:Reddy K; Kearns M; Alvarez-Arango S; Carrillo-Martin I; Cuervo-Pardo N; Cuervo-Pardo L; Dimov V; Lang DM; Lopez-Alvarez S; Schroer B; Mohan K; Dula M; Zheng S; Kozinetz C; Gonzalez-Estrada A
[Ad] Address:Department of Pediatrics East, Tennessee State University, Johnson City, TN, USA.
[Ti] Title:YouTube and Food Allergy: An Appraisal of the Educational Quality of Information.
[So] Source:Pediatr Allergy Immunol;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1399-3038
[Cp] Country of publication:England
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:BACKGROUND: Food allergy affects an estimated 8% of children and 3% of adults in the US. Food-allergic individuals increasingly use the web for medical information. We sought to determine the educational quality of food allergy YouTube videos. METHODS: We performed a YouTube search using keywords "food allergy" and "food allergies". The 300 most viewed videos were included and analyzed for characteristics, source, and content. Source was further classified as health care provider, alternative medicine provider, patient, company, media, and professional society. A scoring system (FA-DQS) was created to evaluate quality (-10 to +34 points). Negative points were assigned for misleading information. Eight blinded reviewers scored each video independently. RESULTS: Three hundred videos were analyzed, with a median of 6,351.50 views, 19 likes, one dislike. More video presenters were female (54.3%). The most common type of video source was alternative medicine provider (26.3%). Alternative treatments included: water fast, juicing, ayurveda, apple cider, yoga, visualization, and sea moss. Controversial diagnostics included kinesiology, IgG testing, pulse test. Almost half of the videos depicted a non-IgE mediated reaction (49.0%).Videos by professional societies had the highest FA-DQS (7.27). Scores for videos by professional societies were significantly different from other sources (p < 0.001). There was a high degree of agreement among reviewers (ICC = 0.820; p < 0.001). CONCLUSION: YouTube videos on food allergy frequently recommend controversial diagnostics and commonly depict non-IgE mediated reactions. There is a need for high quality, evidence-based, educational videos on food allergy. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/pai.12885

  6 / 4190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29512356
[Au] Autor:Usher C; Thompson A; Griebeler M; Senders A; Seibel C; Ly R; Murchison C; Hagen K; Afong KA; Bourdette D; Ross R; Borgatti A; Shinto L
[Ad] Address:Department of Psychiatry, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon.
[Ti] Title:Meals, Mindfulness, & Moving Forward: A feasibility study to a multi-modal lifestyle approach in early psychosis.
[So] Source:Early Interv Psychiatry;, 2018 Mar 07.
[Is] ISSN:1751-7893
[Cp] Country of publication:Australia
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: The primary aim was to demonstrate adherence to a novel 6-week lifestyle intervention program ("Meals, Mindfulness, & Moving Forward" [M ]) designed to help improve lifestyle practices of youth with a history of at least 1 psychotic episode. METHODS: M used a non-equivalent control group design involving clients from a community early intervention program. Seventeen individuals in the active M program and 16 controls were assessed for secondary outcomes at baseline, 6-weeks, and 12-weeks (6 weeks post-intervention) on cardiometabolic and symptomatic outcomes. RESULTS: The program met its primary aim with 88% (15/17) of participants meeting adherence criteria. Compared with the controls, M participants showed significant improvement in positive psychotic symptoms (P = .002). CONCLUSION: This pilot study showed that young people involved in a community early intervention program adhered to an activity-based lifestyle program which included mindfulness meditation, yoga and nutrition education, warranting further evaluation with a larger sample size.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher
[do] DOI:10.1111/eip.12546

  7 / 4190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29510966
[Au] Autor:Sauvan M; Chabbert-Buffet N; Canis M; Collinet P; Fritel X; Geoffron S; Legendre G; Wattier JM; Fernandez H
[Ad] Address:Service de gynécologie-obstétrique, CHU Bicêtre, AP-HP, 78, avenue du Général de Gaulle, 94275 Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. Electronic address: marine.sauvan@aphp.fr.
[Ti] Title:Traitement médical de l'endométriose douloureuse sans infertilité, RPC Endométriose CNGOF-HAS. [Medical treatment for the management of painful endometriosis without infertility: CNGOF-HAS Endometriosis Guidelines].
[So] Source:Gynecol Obstet Fertil Senol;, 2018 Mar 03.
[Is] ISSN:2468-7189
[Cp] Country of publication:France
[La] Language:fre
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To provide clinical practice guidelines for the management of painful endometriosis in women without infertility. METHODS: Systematic review of the literature literature since 2006, level of evidence rating, external proofreading and grading of the recommendation grade by an expert group according to HAS methodology. RESULTS: Combined hormonal contraceptives (COP) and the levonorgestrel-releasing intra-uterin system (LNG-IUS) are recommended as first-line hormonal therapies for the treatment of painful endometriosis (grade B). Second-line therapy relies on oral desogestrel microprogestative, etonogestrel-releasing implant, GnRH analogs (GnRHa) and dienogest (grade C). It is recommended to use add-back therapy containing estrogen in association with GnRHa (grade B). After endometriosis surgery, hormonal treatment relying on COP or LNG-IUS is recommended to prevent pain recurrence (grade B). COP is recommended to reduce the risk of endometrioma recurrence after surgery (grade B) but the prescription of GnRHa is not recommended (grade C). Continuous COP is recommended in case of dysmenorrhea (grade B). GnRHa is not recommended as first line endometriosis treatment for adolescent girl because of the risk of bone demineralization (grade B). The management of endometriosis-induced chronic pain requires an interdisciplinary evaluation. Physical therapies improving the quality of life such as yoga, relaxation or osteopathy can be proposed (expert agreement). Promising medical alternatives are currently under preclinical and clinical evaluation.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[St] Status:Publisher

  8 / 4190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 27776835
[Au] Autor:Mustian KM; Cole CL; Lin PJ; Asare M; Fung C; Janelsins MC; Kamen CS; Peppone LJ; Magnuson A
[Ti] Title:Exercise Recommendations for the Management of Symptoms Clusters Resulting From Cancer and Cancer Treatments.
[So] Source:Semin Oncol Nurs;32(4):383-393, 2016 11.
[Is] ISSN:1878-3449
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To review existing exercise guidelines for cancer patients and survivors for the management of symptom clusters. DATA SOURCES: Review of PubMed literature and published exercise guidelines. CONCLUSION: Cancer and its treatments are responsible for a copious number of incapacitating symptoms that markedly impair quality of life. The exercise oncology literature provides consistent support for the safety and efficacy of exercise interventions in managing cancer- and treatment-related symptoms, as well as improving quality of life in cancer patients and survivors. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING PRACTICE: Effective management of symptoms enhances recovery, resumption of normal life activities and quality of life for patients and survivors. Exercise is a safe, appropriate, and effective therapeutic option before, during, and after the completion of treatment for alleviating symptoms and symptom clusters.
[Mh] MeSH terms primary: Exercise
Neoplasms/nursing
Quality of Life
[Mh] MeSH terms secundary: Humans
Survivors
Symptom Assessment
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180307
[Lr] Last revision date:180307
[Js] Journal subset:IM; N
[Da] Date of entry for processing:161026
[St] Status:MEDLINE

  9 / 4190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29413079
[Au] Autor:Kwasky AN; Serowoky ML
[Ad] Address:University of Detroit Mercy, McAuley School of Nursing, 4001 W. McNichols, Detroit, MI 48221, United States. Electronic address: Kwaskyan@udmercy.edu.
[Ti] Title:Yoga to Enhance Self Efficacy: An Intervention for At-risk Youth.
[So] Source:Arch Psychiatr Nurs;32(1):82-85, 2018 02.
[Is] ISSN:1532-8228
[Cp] Country of publication:United States
[La] Language:eng
[Ab] Abstract:OBJECTIVE: Yoga has demonstrated effectiveness in improving self-management in a variety of disease states however little is known about the impact of yoga as a health promotion intervention for adolescent females in an urban school based environment. This pilot study was conducted to determine if yoga could improve the self-efficacy and body core tone in at-risk adolescent female participants. METHOD: A quasi-experimental design was employed, with data collection at baseline, end of program, and 1month post-program. Fifteen participants ages 11-14 were recruited. Yoga was practiced twice weekly for eight weeks. Self-efficacy was measured using a standardized tool, the Self-Efficacy Questionnaire for Children (SEQ-C). Improvements in flexibility and core body tone were also examined. The researchers collected data on adverse childhood events using the Adverse Childhood Event (ACEs) scale. RESULTS: Fifteen participants were successfully recruited and 14 (87%) were retained through the duration of the project. Based on the small sample size, non-parametric tests were used (Freidman's test). Although there were no significant improvements in total SEQ-C, there were significant improvements in SEQ-C social subscale (p=0.028). Significant improvements were also identified in waist circumference (p=0.001) and in flexibility (p=0.034). CONCLUSIONS: Participant attendance/dose did not correlate to any of the outcomes, however with the physical and emotional improvements noted, it is assumed that any level of attendance was beneficial. Improvements in the social subscale of the SEQ-C could be the result of belonging to a group and strengthening healthy relationships.
[Pt] Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
[Em] Entry month:1802
[Cu] Class update date: 180306
[Lr] Last revision date:180306
[St] Status:In-Process

  10 / 4190 MEDLINE  
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[PMID]: 29503371
[Au] Autor:Okamoto R; Mizukami K
[Ad] Address:Doctoral Program in Human Care Science. Graduate School of Comprehensive Human Sciences, University of Tsukuba.
[Ti] Title:[The effective of facial exercises on the mental health in elderly adults].
[So] Source:Nihon Ronen Igakkai Zasshi;55(1):74-80, 2018.
[Is] ISSN:0300-9173
[Cp] Country of publication:Japan
[La] Language:jpn
[Ab] Abstract:AIM: Although it is well documented that exercising is good for the mental health and cognitive function as well as the physical condition in elderly people, exercising is difficult in elderly individuals with a low motor function. To develop an exercise program targeting elderly individuals unsuited for whole-body exercises, we assessed the effects of facial exercises on the mental health in healthy elderly people. METHODS: Community-dwelling older adults (N = 75, age range = 65-87 years) were randomly divided into a facial exercises group and a wait-listed control group. A facial exercises program of 30 min was given twice a week for 12 weeks. This program consisted of rhythmic facial movement, muscle stretching, facial yoga, and Tanden breathing. The GHQ-12 for mental health were administered to both groups before and after the 12-week study period. In addition, the facial expression and tongue muscle power were measured. RESULTS: Fifty-three participants completed the protocol. In the intervention group, the GHQ-12, facial expression, and tongue muscle power improved post-intervention. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest that facial exercises are effective in improving the mental health, facial expression, tongue muscle power of elderly people, and that exercises may be useful as a therapeutic modality in this population.
[Pt] Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
[Em] Entry month:1803
[Cu] Class update date: 180305
[Lr] Last revision date:180305
[St] Status:In-Process
[do] DOI:10.3143/geriatrics.55.74


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