Base de dados : LILACS
Pesquisa : D08.811.739.500.667 [Categoria DeCS]
Referências encontradas : 3 [refinar]
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Id: biblio-889188
Autor: Mares-Guia, Maria Angélica MM; Guterres, Alexandro; Rozental, Tatiana; Ferreira, Michelle dos Santos; Lemos, Elba RS.
Título: Clinical and epidemiological use of nested PCR targeting the repetitive element IS1111 associated with the transposase gene from Coxiella burnetii
Fonte: Braz. j. microbiol;49(1):138-143, Jan.-Mar. 2018. tab, graf.
Idioma: en.
Projeto: CNPq; . FAPERJ.
Resumo: ABSTRACT Q fever is a worldwide zoonosis caused by Coxiella burnetii—a small obligate intracellular Gram-negative bacterium found in a variety of animals. It is transmitted to humans by inhalation of contaminated aerosols from urine, feces, milk, amniotic fluid, placenta, abortion products, wool, and rarely by ingestion of raw milk from infected animals. Nested PCR can improve the sensitivity and specificity of testing while offering a suitable amplicon size for sequencing. Serial dilutions were performed tenfold to test the limit of detection, and the result was 10× detection of C. burnetti DNA with internal nested PCR primers relative to trans-PCR. Different biological samples were tested and identified only in nested PCR. This demonstrates the efficiency and effectiveness of the primers. Of the 19 samples, which amplify the partial sequence of C. burnetii, 12 were positive by conventional PCR and nested PCR. Seven samples—five spleen tissue samples from rodents and two tick samples—were only positive in nested PCR. With these new internal primers for trans-PCR, we demonstrate that our nested PCR assay for C. burnetii can achieve better results than conventional PCR.
Descritores: Proteínas de Bactérias/genética
Elementos de DNA Transponíveis
Reação em Cadeia da Polimerase/métodos
Coxiella burnetii/isolamento & purificação
Transposases/genética
Febre/microbiologia
-Proteínas de Bactérias/metabolismo
Coxiella burnetii/classificação
Coxiella burnetii/genética
Transposases/metabolismo
Limites: Seres Humanos
Tipo de Publ: Estudos de Avaliação
Responsável: BR1.1 - BIREME


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Lemos, Elba Regina Sampaio de
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Id: lil-643760
Autor: Rozental, Tatiana; Mascarenhas, Luis Filipe; Rozenbaum, Ronaldo; Gomes, Raphael; Mattos, Grasiely Souza; Magno, Cecília Carlos; Almeida, Daniele Nunes; Rossi, Maria Inês Doria; Favacho, Alexsandra RM; Lemos, Elba Regina Sampaio de.
Título: Coxiella burnetii, the agent of Q fever in Brazil: its hidden role in seronegative arthritis and the importance of molecular diagnosis based on the repetitive element IS1111 associated with the transposase gene
Fonte: Mem. Inst. Oswaldo Cruz;107(5):695-697, Aug. 2012.
Idioma: en.
Resumo: Coxiella burnetii is the agent of Q fever , an emergent worldwide zoonosis of wide clinical spectrum. Although C. burnetii infection is typically associated with acute infection, atypical pneumonia and flu-like symptoms, endocarditis, osteoarticular manifestations and severe disease are possible, especially when the patient has a suppressed immune system; however, these severe complications are typically neglected. This study reports the sequencing of the repetitive element IS1111 of the transposase gene of C. burnetii from blood and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from a patient with severe pneumonia following methotrexate therapy, resulting in the molecular diagnosis of Q fever in a patient who had been diagnosed with active seronegative polyarthritis two years earlier. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the first documented case of the isolation of C. burnetii DNA from a BAL sample.
Descritores: Artrite/microbiologia
Coxiella burnetii/genética
DNA Bacteriano/genética
Febre Q/diagnóstico
Sequências Repetitivas de Ácido Nucleico/genética
Transposases/genética
-Doença Aguda
Lavagem Broncoalveolar
Coxiella burnetii/isolamento & purificação
Limites: Adulto
Seres Humanos
Masculino
Tipo de Publ: Relatos de Casos
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Responsável: BR1.1 - BIREME


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Id: lil-604484
Autor: Marcon, HS; Domingues, DS; Coscrato, VE; Selivon, D; Perondini, ALP; Marion, CL.
Título: New mariner elements in Anastrepha species (Diptera: Tephritidae)
Fonte: Neotrop. entomol;40(5):568-574, Sept.-Oct. 2011. ilus.
Idioma: en.
Projeto: FAPESP.
Resumo: Mariner-like elements (MLE) are members from class II of transposable elements also known as DNA transposons. These elements have a wide distribution among different groups of organisms, including insects, which can be explained by horizontal and vertical gene-transfer. MLE families have been described in tephritid flies and other genera. During screening for Wolbachia bacteria in fruit flies of the genus Anastrepha, we discovered two sequences related to mariner-like elements. Based on these sequences, we designed primers that allowed us to isolate and characterize two new mariner-like elements (Anmar1 and Anmar2) in Anastrepha flies. These elements, which belong to the mellifera and rosa subfamilies have a low nucleotide diversity, and are probably inactive and acquired by vertical transfer. This is the first report of mariner-like transposons in flies found in South America.
Descritores: Proteínas de Ligação a DNA/genética
Tephritidae/classificação
Tephritidae/genética
Transposases/genética
-Filogenia
Limites: Animais
Tipo de Publ: Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Responsável: BR1.1 - BIREME



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