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  1 / 11260 MEDLINE  
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PMID:29069023
Autor:Collado-Mateo D; Domínguez-Muñoz FJ; Olivares PR; Adsuar JC; Gusi N
Dirección:aFaculty of Sport Science, University of Extremadura, Spain bFacultad de Educación, Universidad Autónoma de Chile, Talca, Chile.
Título:Stair negotiation in women with fibromyalgia: A descriptive correlational study.
Fuente:Medicine (Baltimore); 96(43):e8364, 2017 Oct.
ISSN:1536-5964
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:Walking up and down stairs is a common and important activity of daily living. Women with fibromyalgia often show a reduced ability to perform this task.The objective of this study was to evaluate the test-retest reliability of stair negotiation tasks and to assess the impact of fibromyalgia symptoms on the ability to negotiate stairs.Forty-two women with fibromyalgia participated in this descriptive correlational study. The relevance of the stair negotiation (both walking up and down) was evaluated by assessing its association with the revised version of the fibromyalgia impact questionnaire (FIQ-R) and other health-related variables. Test-retest reliability was also analyzed. The main outcome measures were time spent walking up and down stairs and impact of fibromyalgia, quality of life, number of falls, weight, and lower limb strength and endurance.The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) for stair descent was 0.929 whereas that for ascent was 0.972. The score in these tests correlated significantly with the total score for the FIQ-R and the score for many of dimensions and symptoms: that is, physical function, overall impact of fibromyalgia, pain, energy, stiffness, restorative sleep, tenderness, self-perceived balance problems, and sensitivity.Given the importance of the stair negotiation as activity of daily living and the high reliability, both stair ascent and descent tasks may be useful as outcome measures in studies on patients with fibromyalgia.
Tipo de publicación:EVALUATION STUDIES; JOURNAL ARTICLE


  2 / 11260 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28801079
Autor:Bradshaw K; Wagels M
Dirección:Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Princess Alexandra Hospital, 199 Ipswich Road, Woolloongabba 4102, Australia. Electronic address: kim.rose.bradshaw@gmail.com.
Título:Re-raising muscle flaps: A randomised controlled animal study.
Fuente:J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg; 70(11):1556-1562, 2017 Nov.
ISSN:1878-0539
País de publicación:Netherlands
Idioma:eng
Resumen:BACKGROUND: In the experience of our centre, 33% of reconstructed compound lower limb injuries will need an orthopaedic revision. A flap may be re-raised through numerous methods, and historically, the approach of choice has been based on the principle of protecting the vascular pedicle rather than the inset. Our aim was to determine whether a marginal versus a split approach to re-raising inferred a higher risk of flap necrosis and whether more attention should be paid to protecting the inset of the flap, particularly at the distal portion. METHOD: A pedicled pectoralis profundus muscle flap was raised in 32 Sprague-Dawley rats and transposed to the lateral chest wall. After 21 days, the flaps were randomised into one of four treatment groups according to the surgical approach and whether or not the anatomical vascular pedicle was ligated. Necrosis was assessed 48 h later, both clinically and through the analysis of digital photographs. RESULTS: The rate of necrosis in the marginal group was higher than that in the split group (63% vs 0%, p < 0.001, McNemar). More necrosis occurred in the former when the pedicle was ligated (p < 0.001, Fisher's exact test). Measured necrosis was also higher in the marginal group (18% vs 0%, p = 0.002, Wilcoxon signed-rank test). Twenty-nine percent more flap could be raised using the split approach (p = 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test). CONCLUSIONS: Splitting a muscle flap produces significantly less necrosis than incising the inset, regardless of whether the pedicle is in flow. It also offers wider exposure of structures deep to the flap. These findings provide a detailed model for human trials, which is presented as a proposed management algorithm. It also highlights conditions that must be met for translation to a human population.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  3 / 11260 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28411958
Autor:Lim YP; Lin YC; Pandy MG
Dirección:Dept of Mechanical Engineering, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia. Electronic address: y.lim10@pgrad.unimelb.edu.au.
Título:Effects of step length and step frequency on lower-limb muscle function in human gait.
Fuente:J Biomech; 57:1-7, 2017 May 24.
ISSN:1873-2380
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of step length and step frequency on lower-limb muscle function in walking. Three-dimensional gait data were used in conjunction with musculoskeletal modeling techniques to evaluate muscle function over a range of walking speeds using prescribed combinations of step length and step frequency. The body was modeled as a 10-segment, 21-degree-of-freedom skeleton actuated by 54 muscle-tendon units. Lower-limb muscle forces were calculated using inverse dynamics and static optimization. We found that five muscles - GMAX, GMED, VAS, GAS, and SOL - dominated vertical support and forward progression independent of changes made to either step length or step frequency, and that, overall, changes in step length had a greater influence on lower-limb joint motion, net joint moments and muscle function than step frequency. Peak forces developed by the uniarticular hip and knee extensors, as well as the normalized fiber lengths at which these muscles developed their peak forces, correlated more closely with changes in step length than step frequency. Increasing step length resulted in larger contributions from the hip and knee extensors and smaller contributions from gravitational forces (limb posture) to vertical support. These results provide insight into why older people with weak hip and knee extensors walk more slowly by reducing step length rather than step frequency and also help to identify the key muscle groups that ought to be targeted in exercise programs designed to improve gait biomechanics in older adults.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  4 / 11260 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28273653
Autor:Pomeranz CB; Wehrli NE; Tyberg A; Belfi LM
Dirección:New York Presbyterian Hospital, Weill Cornell Medical Center, 525 East 68th Street, Box 141, New York, NY 10065-4870, Department of Radiology, United States. Electronic address: chp9024@med.cornell.edu.
Título:Unusual migration of fractured ERCP guidewire: A case report.
Fuente:Clin Imaging; 43:93-96, 2017 May - Jun.
ISSN:1873-4499
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) routinely uses hydrophilic guidewires to cannulate ducts and traverse stenoses. Fracture of these guidewires have been reported, however, migration of these fractured fragments is an extremely rare occurrence that has yet to be reported in the literature. We present a case of a fractured ERCP guidewire with extensive migration in the retroperitoneal and lower extremity soft tissues and vasculature with radiologic correlation across multiple modalities-MRI, CT, and radiographs-as well as pathologic correlation. This case illustrates a rare but serious complication of ERCP and demonstrates the imaging findings associated with it.
Tipo de publicación:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE


  5 / 11260 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28194903
Autor:De Mauri A; Torreggiani M; Brambilla M; Chiarinotti D
Dirección:Nephrology and Dialysis Unit, University Hospital "Maggiore della Carità", Novara, Italy.
Título:Vitamin K Antagonist Therapy Is a Risk Factor for Ulcer Development and Death Among Dialyzed Patients.
Fuente:Ther Apher Dial; 21(2):150-156, 2017 Apr.
ISSN:1744-9987
País de publicación:Australia
Idioma:eng
Resumen:Peripheral artery disease is a common complication among dialyzed patients. Since Vitamin K antagonists promote metastatic calcifications and these are the main determinants of vascular damage, we investigated their role in the development of lower limb ulcers in dialyzed patients. We retrospectively enrolled 316 dialyzed patients, aged 68 ± 15 years, 65% male, 32% diabetic, 43% with ischemic heart disease and followed them for 36 ± 25 months. 60 patients assumed Vitamin K antagonists: they were older, with a higher prevalence of heart disease, at greater risk of death and they developed more ulcers and underwent more lower limb amputations compared to the rest of our cohort. Peripheral artery disease, Vitamin K antagonists and diabetes were independent risk factors for foot lesions. In addition, Vitamin K antagonists were also an independent risk factor for death. Vitamin K antagonists are a potent independent risk factor for the development of the uremic foot syndrome and death.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Nombre de substancia:0 (Anticoagulants); 12001-79-5 (Vitamin K)


  6 / 11260 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27987245
Autor:Willekens SM; van der Kroon I; Bos D; Joosten L; Frielink C; Boerman OC; Brom M; Gotthardt M
Dirección:Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, The Netherlands.
Título:Quantitative and longitudinal imaging of intramuscular transplanted islets of Langerhans with SPECT using [ I]IBZM.
Fuente:Diabetes Obes Metab; 19(4):604-608, 2017 Apr.
ISSN:1463-1326
País de publicación:England
Idioma:eng
Resumen:A non-invasive imaging method to monitor islet grafts could provide novel and improved insight into the fate of transplanted islets and, potentially, monitor the effect of therapeutic interventions. Therefore, such an imaging method could help improve long-term transplantation outcome. Here, we investigated the use of [ I]IBZM for insulin positive graft volume quantification and longitudinal graft monitoring. SPECT images were acquired 6 weeks after islet transplantation in the calf muscle of rats. For longitudinal graft analysis, rats were monitored by SPECT for 10 weeks. After animals were euthanized, graft containing muscles were dissected for ex vivo analysis and insulin-positive graft volume determination. Six weeks after transplantation, a clear signal was observed in all grafts by SPECT imaging. Moreover, the intensity of the SPECT signal correlated linearly with insulin-positive graft volume, as determined histologically. Longitudinal graft follow-up showed a clear SPECT signal of the transplant from 3 until 10 weeks after transplantation. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time the successful application of a radiotracer, [ I]IBZM, for non-invasive, in vivo graft volume quantification and longitudinal graft monitoring.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Nombre de substancia:0 (Benzamides); 0 (Contrast Media); 0 (Pyrrolidines); 84226-06-2 (3-iodo-2-hydroxy-6-methoxy-N-((1-ethyl-2-pyrrolidinyl)methyl)benzamide)


  7 / 11260 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28538320
Autor:Charlton JM; Hammond CA; Cochrane CK; Hatfield GL; Hunt MA
Dirección:Motion Analysis and Biofeedback Laboratory, Department of Physical Therapy, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.
Título:The Effects of a Heel Wedge on Hip, Pelvis and Trunk Biomechanics During Squatting in Resistance Trained Individuals.
Fuente:J Strength Cond Res; 31(6):1678-1687, 2017 06.
ISSN:1533-4287
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:Barbell back squats are a popular exercise for developing lower extremity strength and power. However, this exercise has potential injury risks, particularly to the lumbar spine, pelvis, and hip joint. Previous literature suggests heel wedges as a means of favorably adjusting trunk and pelvis kinematics with the intention of reducing such injury risks. Yet no direct biomechanical research exists to support these recommendations. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the effects of heel wedges compared with barefoot on minimally loaded barbell back squats. Fourteen trained male participants performed a barbell back squat in bare feet or with their feet raised bilaterally with a 2.5-cm wooden block while 3-dimensional kinematics, kinetics, and electromyograms were collected. The heel wedge condition elicited significantly less forward trunk flexion angles at peak knee flexion, and peak external hip joint moments (p ≤ 0.05) compared with barefoot conditions. However, no significant differences were observed between conditions for trunk and pelvis angle differences at peak knee flexion (p > 0.05). Lastly, no peak or root mean square differences in muscle activity were elicited between conditions (p > 0.05). Our results lend support for the suggestions provided in literature aimed at using heel wedges as a means of reducing excessive forward trunk flexion. However, the maintenance of a neutral spine, another important safety factor, is not affected by the use of heel wedges. Therefore, heel wedges may be a viable modification for reduction of excessive forward trunk flexion but not for reduction in relative trunk-pelvis flexion during barbell back squats.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  8 / 11260 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28538314
Autor:Cotter JA; Jamison ST; Schloemer SA; Chaudhari AMW
Dirección:1Department of Kinesiology, California State University, Long Beach, California; 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Spaulding National Running Center, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, Massachusetts; 3Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio; and 4Division of Physical Therapy, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio.
Título:Do Neuromuscular Dentistry-Designed Mouthguards Enhance Dynamic Movement Ability in Competitive Athletes?
Fuente:J Strength Cond Res; 31(6):1627-1635, 2017 06.
ISSN:1533-4287
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a neuromuscular dentistry-designed mouthguard (NMDD) on dynamic movement ability. Forty-two competitive athletes (8 women, 21.9 ± 2.9 years, 66.8 ± 18.8 kg, 1.68 ± 0.11 m; 34 men, 22.8 ± 4.8 years, 77.4 ± 12.7 kg, 1.78 ± 0.08 m) with greater than 2 years' experience in their designated sport were enrolled in the study. Participants completed the Functional Movement Screen (FMS), modified Star Excursion Balance Test (mSEBT), and a single-leg landing (SLL) task. Each subject was tested with 3 separate mouthguard conditions in random order: (a) no mouthguard (NO), (b) over-the-counter boil-and-bite mouthguard (BB; Shockdoctor Gravity, (c) and an NMDD (Pure Power Elite). Data were analyzed using a repeated-measures analysis of variance for each variable. There were no differences between mouthguard conditions in each of the 7 individual components or composite FMS score (p > 0.05). No differences were seen in the anterior, posteromedial, or posterolateral movements of the mSEBT; overall composite score; or time-to-contact measurements (p > 0.05). The BB condition (2.16 Nm·kg) exhibited higher peak knee valgus moments (pKVM) on the right leg only when compared with the NMDD condition (1.95 Nm·kg; p = 0.003) but not the NO condition (2.09 Nm·kg; p = 0.7262) during the SLL task. No differences in pKVM were seen on the left leg (p = 0.324). In conclusion, an NMDD was not effective at enhancing or diminishing measures of dynamic movement ability compared with BB or NO conditions.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL


  9 / 11260 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28538312
Autor:Zubac D; Simunic B
Dirección:1Faculty of Kinesiology, University of Split, Split, Croatia; and 2Science and Research Center, Institute for Kinesiology Research, University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia.
Título:Skeletal Muscle Contraction Time and Tone Decrease After 8 Weeks of Plyometric Training.
Fuente:J Strength Cond Res; 31(6):1610-1619, 2017 06.
ISSN:1533-4287
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:The aim of the study was to examine whether an improvement in jumping performance after 8 weeks of plyometric training (PT) runs in parallel with changes in lower-limb skeletal muscle contractile properties. Using noninvasive tensiomyography (TMG), we assessed contraction time (Tc) and the maximal amplitude of radial displacement (Dm) in 20 subjects (50% men; age 22.4 ± 4.7 years of age), randomly divided in PT group (N = 10; PLYO) and a control group (N = 10; CTRL). The PLYO performed 8 weeks of PT. Tensiomyography was measured in 5 leg skeletal muscles: vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris (BF), tibialis anterior (TA), gastrocnemius medialis (GM), and gastrocnemius lateralis (GL). Additionally, we evaluated countermovement jump (CMJ) height improvement on a ground force plate. Assessments were repeated before and after PT. After 8 weeks of PT, CMJ height increased by 12.2% in PLYO (p = 0.015), but not in CRTL. Contraction time, which is related to myosin heavy-chain type 1 (MHC-1) proportion, decreased in VL (-8.7%; p < 0.001), BF (-26.7%; p = 0.032), TA (-32.9%; p = 0.004), and GL (-25.8%; p = 0.044), but not in GM (-8.1%; p = 0.158). The estimated VL MHC-1 proportion decreased by -8.2% (p = 0.041). The maximal amplitude of radial displacement, inversely related to muscle tone, decreased in BF (-26.5%; p = 0.032), GM (-14.9%; p = 0.017), GL (-31.5%; p = 0.017), but not in TA (-16.8%; p = 0.113) and VL (-6.0%; p = 0.654). After PT, jumping performance increased, which was paralleled by decreased Tc and decreased muscle tone. Additionally, adaptations to contractile properties were muscle specific, which is important for future studies. It seems that adjustments were dose dependent, being higher in muscles with lower habitual load.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL


  10 / 11260 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28538308
Autor:Silinskas V; GrUnovas A; Stanislovaitiene J; Buliuolis A; Trinkunas E; Poderys J
Dirección:Institute of Sport Science and Innovations, Lithuanian Sports University, Kaunas, Lithuania.
Título:Effect of Electrical Myostimulation on the Function of Lower Leg Muscles.
Fuente:J Strength Cond Res; 31(6):1577-1584, 2017 06.
ISSN:1533-4287
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:Electrical myostimulation (EMS) method is applied to improve skeletal muscle function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of EMS applied to the sole and calf muscles on their strength and on maximal sprint performance. Each of 10 training sessions involved 10 seconds of stimulation and 50 seconds of rest for a total of 10 minutes. After the 10 training sessions, the maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of right calf muscles increased by 6.0% from 830.0 ± 47.0 N to 878.0 ± 45.3 N (p ≤ 0.05). When EMS was applied to trained athletes, their 10-m sprint performance improved by 2.1% (p ≤ 0.05). In the second part of the study, a 3-week training program with EMS was applied to athletes, which significantly improved their 10-m sprint performance from a standing start by 5.3% and from a running start by 4.7% (p ≤ 0.05). Thus, 10 EMS cycles up to the maximal tolerated intensity applied every other day improved the MVC of foot flexion muscles and 10-m sprint performance from both standing and running starts. Three weeks of EMS training did not affect the intensity of calf muscle blood flow and oxygen saturation at rest. The training program supplemented with 10 EMS sessions produced significantly greater effects on the 10-m sprint performance from both a standing and a running start.
Tipo de publicación:CLINICAL TRIAL; JOURNAL ARTICLE



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