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  1 / 14802 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28648955
Autor:Henoch I; Melin-Johansson C; Bergh I; Strang S; Ek K; Hammarlund K; Lundh Hagelin C; Westin L; Österlind J; Browall M
Dirección:The Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Box 457, SE-405 30 Gothenburg, Sweden; Angered Local Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden. Electronic address: ingela.henoch@gu.se.
Título:Undergraduate nursing students' attitudes and preparedness toward caring for dying persons - A longitudinal study.
Fuente:Nurse Educ Pract; 26:12-20, 2017 Sep.
ISSN:1873-5223
País de publicación:England
Idioma:eng
Resumen:Nursing education needs to prepare students for care of dying patients. The aim of this study was to describe the development of nursing students' attitudes toward caring for dying patients and their perceived preparedness to perform end-of-life care. A longitudinal study was performed with 117 nursing students at six universities in Sweden. The students completed the Frommelt Attitude Toward Care of the Dying Scale (FATCOD) questionnaire at the beginning of first and second year, and at the end of third year of education. After education, the students completed questions about how prepared they felt by to perform end-of-life care. The total FATCOD increased from 126 to 132 during education. Five weeks' theoretical palliative care education significantly predicted positive changes in attitudes toward caring for dying patients. Students with five weeks' theoretical palliative care training felt more prepared and supported by the education to care for a dying patient than students with shorter education. A minority felt prepared to take care of a dead body or meet relatives.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  2 / 14802 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28108110
Autor:Dossey L
Título:Confronting Death Consciously: A Look at Terror Management Theory and Immortality Awareness Theory.
Fuente:Explore (NY); 13(2):81-87, 2017 Mar - Apr.
ISSN:1878-7541
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Tipo de publicación:EDITORIAL


  3 / 14802 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28700812
Autor:Rajeshuni N; Johnston EE; Saynina O; Sanders LM; Chamberlain LJ
Dirección:Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California.
Título:Disparities in location of death of adolescents and young adults with cancer: A longitudinal, population study in California.
Fuente:Cancer; 123(21):4178-4184, 2017 Nov 01.
ISSN:1097-0142
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:BACKGROUND: Patients with a terminal illness should have access to their chosen location of death. Cancer is the leading cause of non-accidental death among adolescents and young adults (AYAs; those aged 15-39 years). Although surveys have suggested that a majority of these patients prefer a home death, to the authors' knowledge, little is known regarding their barriers to accessing their preferred location of death. As a first step, the authors sought to determine, across a large population, 20-year trends in the location of death among AYA patients with cancer. METHODS: Using the Vital Statistics Death Certificate Database of the California Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development, the authors performed a retrospective, population-based analysis of California patients with cancer aged 15 to 39 years who died between 1989 and 2011. Sociodemographic and clinical factors associated with hospital death were examined using multivariable logistic regression. RESULTS: Of 30,573 AYA oncology decedents, 57% died in a hospital, 33% died at home, and 10% died in other locations (eg, hospice facility or nursing facility). Between 1989 and 1994, hospital death rates decreased from 68.3% to 53.6% and at-home death rates increased from 16.8% to 35.5%. Between 1995 and 2011, these rates were stable. Those individuals who were more likely to die in a hospital were those aged <30 years, of minority race, of Hispanic ethnicity, who lived ≤10 miles from a specialty center, and who had a diagnosis of leukemia or lymphoma. CONCLUSIONS: Overall, the majority of AYA cancer deaths occurred in a hospital, with a 5-year shift to more in-home deaths that abated after 1995. In-hospital deaths were more common among younger patients, patients of minority race/ethnicities, and those with a leukemia or lymphoma diagnosis. Further study is needed to determine whether these rates and disparities are consistent with patient preferences. Cancer 2017;123:4178-4184. © 2017 American Cancer Society.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  4 / 14802 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28652479
Autor:Downar J; Francescutti LH
Dirección:Divisions of Critical Care and Palliative Care (Downar), University of Toronto, Toronto, Ont.; School of Public Health and Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry (Francescutti), University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alta. james.downar@utoronto.ca.
Título:Medical assistance in dying: time for physicians to step up to protect themselves and patients.
Fuente:CMAJ; 189(25):E849-E850, 2017 06 26.
ISSN:1488-2329
País de publicación:Canada
Idioma:eng
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  5 / 14802 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28315533
Autor:Phillips C; Welcer B
Dirección:University of Texas in Austin.
Título:Songs for the Soul: A Program to Address a Nurse's Grief
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Fuente:Clin J Oncol Nurs; 21(2):145-146, 2017 Apr 01.
ISSN:1538-067X
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:When caring for patients with cancer, a number of situations arise that cause nurses to grieve. Nurses need time and space to grieve to prevent the untoward effects of cumulative grief. While providing a safe space for nurses to be vulnerable in grief, Songs for the Soul combines the healing effects of expressive writing, storytelling, and music to help nurses address the grief and suffering they experience in their work. The use of storytelling through music portrays an expression of their grief that matches the intensity of their caregiving experience.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  6 / 14802 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28445330
Autor:Fahlberg B
Dirección:Beth Fahlberg is CEO and owner, Palliative Nursing Network, Madison, Wisconsin, and chair of the Palliative & End-of-Life Nursing Coalition of the Wisconsin Nurses Association.
Título:A good death.
Fuente:Nursing; 47(5):14, 2017 05.
ISSN:1538-8689
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  7 / 14802 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28084882
Autor:Granek L; Ariad S; Nakash O; Cohen M; Bar-Sela G; Ben-David M
Dirección:Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Beer Sheva; Baruch Ivcher School of Psychology, Interdisciplinary Center, Herzliya; Rambam Health Care Campus; Technion-Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa; Sheba Medical Center; and Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel.
Título:Mixed-Methods Study of the Impact of Chronic Patient Death on Oncologists' Personal and Professional Lives.
Fuente:J Oncol Pract; 13(1):e1-e10, 2017 Jan.
ISSN:1935-469X
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:PURPOSE: Although some research has found that health care professionals experience grief when their patients die, within the oncology context, few studies have examined the impact of this loss on oncology personnel. Given the paucity of empirical studies on this topic, this research explored the impact of patient death on oncologists. Methods and Materials This study used a mixed-methods design. The qualitative component used the grounded theory method of data collection and analysis. Twenty-two oncologists were recruited from three adult oncology centers. Purposive sampling was used to gain maximum variation in the sample. The quantitative component involved a convenience sample of 79 oncologists recruited through oncologist collaborators. RESULTS: The qualitative study indicated that frequent patient death has both personal and professional impacts on oncologists. Personal impacts included changes to their personality, gaining of perspective on their lives, and a strain to their social relationships. Professional impacts included exhaustion and burnout, learning from each patient death, and decision making. The frequency analysis indicated that oncologists experienced both positive and negative impacts of patient death. A majority reported that exposure to patient death gave them a better perspective on life (78.5%) and motivated them to improve patient care (66.7%). Negative consequences included exhaustion (62%) and burnout (75.9%) as well as compartmentalization of feelings at work and at home (69.6%). CONCLUSION: Frequent patient death has an impact on oncologists' lives, some of which negatively affect the quality of life for oncologists, their families, and their patients.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY


  8 / 14802 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28279760
Autor:Ghosh SK
Dirección:Department of Anatomy, ESIC Medical College, Gulbarga Sedam Road, Gulbarga, Karnataka 585106, India. Electronic address: drsanjib79@gmail.com.
Título:Paying respect to human cadavers: We owe this to the first teacher in anatomy.
Fuente:Ann Anat; 211:129-134, 2017 May.
ISSN:1618-0402
País de publicación:Germany
Idioma:eng
Resumen:Every human cadaver which undergoes anatomical dissection enriches medical science and deserves to be treated with utmost respect. The aim of the present study is to identify the practices followed by medical schools across the globe to ensure that the human cadaver is treated with respect and dignity while it is utilized within the domain of medical education. The article undertakes a review of the literature and takes note of the practice of students taking an oath prior to dissecting cadavers whereby they reflect on their conduct and habits in the dissection room. It emphasizes the guidelines adopted by medical schools to ensure respectful handling of human cadavers during dissection and highlights traditional ways to honor them followed in some parts of the world. The article attempts to focus on the noble endeavor of funeral ceremonies to pay homage to the departed soul who enlightened the students with the knowledge of human anatomy. Finally it converges on the memorial services incorporated into anatomy programs to instill in students an appreciation of the humanity of those who went under the knife as a service to mankind. Based on the observations made in the present study some recommendations are also proposed regarding good practices in human cadaveric dissection. In order to bind science and humanity it is critical to realize our responsibility to reciprocate the anatomical gift of a human body with respect, compassion, care and dignity.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW


  9 / 14802 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28006988
Autor:Nejat N; Whitehead L; Crowe M
Dirección:a School of Nursing and Midwifery , Arak University of Medical Sciences , Arak 6941-7-38481 , Iran.
Título:The use of spirituality and religiosity in coping with colorectal cancer.
Fuente:Contemp Nurse; 53(1):48-59, 2017 Feb.
ISSN:1839-3535
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:BACKGROUND: Spirituality and religiosity are reported as important in coping with cancer but rarely explored across cultures. OBJECTIVES: To explore and compare the use of spirituality and religiosity in coping with colorectal cancer in New Zealand and Iran. METHODS: A cross-sectional qualitative approach involving interviews conducted in New Zealand (n = 20) and Iran (n = 20). The data were analysed using thematic analysis. RESULTS: The majority of participants interviewed used religion as a resource in coping with cancer. A minority described spirituality as separate to religion and drew on spirituality either in relation to religion or alone. All Iranian participants viewed spirituality as intertwined with religion. CONCLUSION: Religious and/or spiritual beliefs formed an important source of support for all Iranians and the majority of New Zealand participants living with cancer. The ability of nurses to identify, recognise, and support these beliefs is important in the provision of holistic care.
Tipo de publicación:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE


  10 / 14802 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28604533
Autor:Trenary A
Dirección:April Trenary, MS, RN, is a clinical instructor at Fran and Earl Ziegler College of Nursing, University of Oklahoma Health Science Center. Her background is critical care and emergency nursing. As a nurse and an educator, April achieves her personal and career goals to encourage and inspire others to reach their full potential.
Título:From the Other Side of the Podium.
Fuente:J Christ Nurs; 34(3):197, 2017 Jul/Sep.
ISSN:0743-2550
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE; PERSONAL NARRATIVES



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