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  1 / 792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27751784
Autor:Ravesloot C; Berendts C; Schiwal A
Dirección:Research and Training Center on Disability in Rural Communities, University of Montana, USA. Electronic address: Craig.Ravesloot@mso.umt.edu.
Título:Can people catastrophize barriers? An exploratory analysis of the association between pain catastrophizing and perceptions of environmental factors.
Fuente:Disabil Health J; 10(1):65-72, 2017 Jan.
ISSN:1876-7583
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:BACKGROUND: Measurement of the environment is taking on increased importance for understanding variability in participation. Most measures of the environment use subjective ratings, yet little is known about how people appraise the environment. OBJECTIVE: /Hypothesis: We conducted this post-hoc study to examine whether or not catastrophizing, an important variable for understanding how pain contributes to disability, may be related to ratings of the environment. We hypothesized higher pain catastrophizing scores would be associated with greater environmental barriers and fewer facilitators. METHODS: Individuals with functional impairments (N = 525) were recruited from a population-based random sample of households in a small western city in the United States to complete a paper-based survey about their health and community living experiences. We conducted exploratory regression analyses to investigate associations with environmental factor ratings. RESULTS: We found substantial associations between pain catastrophizing and both environmental barriers and personal factor problems after controlling for demographics, participation assessed by community trips per week, health conditions, impairment and pain level. The models accounted for 28% of the variance in environmental factor ratings and 52% of the variability personal factor ratings. We also present odds ratios for the association between personal characteristics and the likelihood of endorsing EF and PF. CONCLUSIONS: A variety of individual characteristics are associated with ratings of both environmental and personal factors that impact participation. Among these, pain catastrophizing is a robust predictor of EF and PF ratings which suggests future research designed specifically to test this relationship may generate useful results for developing interventions to increase participation.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  2 / 792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28483657
Autor:Louw A; Puentedura EJ; Reese D; Parker P; Miller T; Mintken PE
Dirección:International Spine Pain Institute, Story City, IA.
Título:Immediate Effects of Mirror Therapy in Patients With Shoulder Pain and Decreased Range of Motion.
Fuente:Arch Phys Med Rehabil; 98(10):1941-1947, 2017 Oct.
ISSN:1532-821X
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:OBJECTIVE: To determine the effects of a brief single component of the graded motor imagery (GMI) sequence (mirror therapy) on active range of motion (AROM), pain, fear avoidance, and pain catastrophization in patients with shoulder pain. DESIGN: Single-blind case series. SETTING: Three outpatient physical therapy clinics. PARTICIPANTS: Patients with shoulder pain and limited AROM (N=69). INTERVENTION: Patients moved their unaffected shoulder through comfortable AROM in front of a mirror so that it appeared that they were moving their affected shoulder. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: We measured pain, pain catastrophization, fear avoidance, and AROM in 69 consecutive patients with shoulder pain and limited AROM before and immediately after mirror therapy. RESULTS: There were significant differences in self-reported pain (P=.014), pain catastrophization (P<.001), and the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (P=.012) immediately after mirror therapy; however, the means did not meet or exceed the minimal detectable change (MDC) for each outcome measure. There was a significant increase (mean, 14.5°) in affected shoulder flexion AROM immediately postmirror therapy (P<.001), which exceeded the MDC of 8°. CONCLUSIONS: A brief mirror therapy intervention can result in statistically significant improvements in pain, pain catastrophization, fear avoidance, and shoulder flexion AROM in patients presenting with shoulder pain with limited AROM. The immediate changes may allow a quicker transition to multimodal treatment, including manual therapy and exercise in these patients. Further studies, including randomized controlled trials, are needed to investigate these findings and determine longer-term effects.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  3 / 792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28562150
Autor:Wylde V; Trela-Larsen L; Whitehouse MR; Blom AW
Dirección:a Musculoskeletal Research Unit, School of Clinical Sciences , University of Bristol.
Título:Preoperative psychosocial risk factors for poor outcomes at 1 and 5 years after total knee replacement.
Fuente:Acta Orthop; 88(5):530-536, 2017 Oct.
ISSN:1745-3682
País de publicación:England
Idioma:eng
Resumen:Background and purpose - Psychosocial factors are important risk factors for poor outcomes in the first year after total knee replacement (TKR), however their impact on long-term outcomes is unclear. We aimed to identify preoperative psychosocial risk factors for poor outcomes at 1 year and 5 years after TKR. Patients and methods - 266 patients were recruited prior to TKR surgery. Knee pain and function were assessed preoperatively and at 1 and 5 years postoperative using the WOMAC Pain score, WOMAC Function score and American Knee Society Score (AKSS) Knee score. Preoperative depression, anxiety, catastrophizing, pain self-efficacy and social support were assessed. Statistical analyses involved multiple linear regression and mixed effect linear regression. Results - Higher anxiety was a risk factor for worse pain at 1 year postoperative. No psychosocial factors were associated with any outcomes at 5 years postoperative. Analysis of change over time found that patients with higher pain self-efficacy had lower preoperative pain and experienced less improvement in pain up to 1 year postoperative. Higher pain self-efficacy was associated with less improvement in the AKSS up to 1 year postoperative but more improvement between 1 and 5 years postoperative. Interpretation - Preoperative anxiety was found to influence pain at 1 year after TKR. However, none of the psychosocial variables were risk factors for a poor outcome at 5 years post-operative, suggesting that the negative effects of anxiety on outcome do not persist in the longer-term.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  4 / 792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28686644
Autor:Marshall PWM; Schabrun S; Knox MF
Dirección:School of Science and Health, Western Sydney University, Penrith South, New South Wales, AUSTRALIA.
Título:Physical activity and the mediating effect of fear, depression, anxiety, and catastrophizing on pain related disability in people with chronic low back pain.
Fuente:PLoS One; 12(7):e0180788, 2017.
ISSN:1932-6203
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:BACKGROUND: Chronic low back pain is a worldwide burden that is not being abated with our current knowledge and treatment of the condition. The fear-avoidance model is used to explain the relationship between pain and disability in patients with chronic low back pain. However there are gaps in empirical support for pathways proposed within this model, and no evidence exists as to whether physical activity moderates these pathways. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study of 218 people with chronic low back pain. Multiple mediation analyses were conducted to determine the role of fear, catastrophizing, depression, and anxiety in the relationship between pain and disability. Separate analyses were performed with physical activity as the moderator. Individuals were classified as performing regular structured physical activity if they described on average once per week for > 30-minutes an activity classified at least moderate intensity (≥ 4-6 METs), activity prescribed by an allied health professional for their back pain, leisure time sport or recreation, or self-directed physical activity such as resistance exercise. RESULTS: Fear, catastrophizing, and depression significantly mediated the relationship between pain and disability (p<0.001). However the mediating effect of catastrophizing was conditional upon weekly physical activity. That is, the indirect effect for catastrophizing mediating the relationship between pain and disability was only significant for individuals reporting weekly physical activity (B = 1.31, 95% CI 0.44 to 2.23), compared to individuals reporting no weekly physical activity (B = 0.21, 95% CI -0.50 to 0.97). Catastrophizing also mediated the relationship between pain and fear (B = 0.37, 95% CI 0.15 to 0.62), with higher scores explaining 53% of the total effect of pain on fear. CONCLUSIONS: These results support previous findings about the importance of fear and depression as factors that should be targeted in low back pain patients to reduce back pain related disability. We have also extended understanding for the mediating effect of catastrophizing on back pain related disability. Back pain patients engaged with regular physical activity may require counselling with regards to negative pain perceptions.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  5 / 792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28320733
Autor:Maclachlan LR; Collins NJ; Matthews MLG; Hodges PW; Vicenzino B
Dirección:The University of Queensland, School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences, Brisbane, Australia.
Título:The psychological features of patellofemoral pain: a systematic review.
Fuente:Br J Sports Med; 51(9):732-742, 2017 May.
ISSN:1473-0480
País de publicación:England
Idioma:eng
Resumen:BACKGROUND: Patellofemoral pain (PFP) is prevalent in adolescence and adulthood and often persists. In contrast to other persistent musculoskeletal conditions, for which non-physical, psychological features are implicated, PFP remains largely conceptualised in mechanical terms. AIMS: To (1) identify whether the psychological characteristics of individuals with PFP differs from asymptomatic controls and (2) evaluate the correlations between psychological characteristics and PFP severity. STUDY DESIGN: Systematic review METHODS: A systematic review of the literature was conducted according to PRISMA guidelines. The Epidemiological Appraisal Instrument was used to evaluate quality. Studies measuring psychological constructs with patient-reported measures were included. Standardised mean differences were calculated and supported by narrative synthesis. RESULTS: Twenty-five studies were eligible. Quality results ranged from 28.3% to 61.7%. Psychological constructs were reported under four groupings: mental health, cognitive factors, behavioural factors and other factors. There is limited evidence of mental health and cognitive differences in some individuals with PFP. Features demonstrating linear correlations with pain and physical function included anxiety/depression, catastrophising, praying and hoping and pain-related fear. CONCLUSIONS: Anxiety, depression, catastrophising and fear of movement may be elevated in individuals with PFP and correlate with pain and reduced physical function. These results derive from a limited number of studies. Future research should aim to evaluate if and how psychological factors contribute to PFP. CLINICAL RELEVANCE: Patients are likely to benefit from clinician vigilance to the presence of psychological factors.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW


  6 / 792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28650969
Autor:Nishigami T; Mibu A; Tanaka K; Yamashita Y; Yamada E; Wand BM; Catley MJ; Stanton TR; Moseley GL
Dirección:Department of Nursing and Physical Therapy, Konan Woman's University, Kobe, Hyogo, Japan.
Título:Development and psychometric properties of knee-specific body-perception questionnaire in people with knee osteoarthritis: The Fremantle Knee Awareness Questionnaire.
Fuente:PLoS One; 12(6):e0179225, 2017.
ISSN:1932-6203
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:BACKGROUND: Recent systematic reviews have demonstrated that pain associated with knee osteoarthritis (OA) is a complex phenomenon that involves various contributors. People with knee OA exhibit symptoms of impaired body-perception, including reduced tactile acuity, impairments in limb laterality recognition, and degraded proprioceptive acuity. The Fremantle Back Awareness Questionnaire (FreBAQ) was developed to assess body-perception specific to the back in people with chronic low back pain. The aim of this study was to develop and assess the psychometric properties of a knee-specific version of the FreBAQ-J (FreKAQ-J), determine whether people with knee pain experience perceptual impairments and investigate the relationship between disturbed self-perception and clinical status. METHODS: Sixty-five people with knee OA completed the FreKAQ-J. A subset of the participants completed the FreKAQ-J again two-weeks later. Rasch analysis was used to assess item order, targeting, category ordering, unidimensionality, person fit, internal consistency, and differential item functioning. Validity was investigated by examining the relationship between the FreKAQ-J and clinical valuables. RESULTS: The FreKAQ-J had acceptable internal consistency, unidimensionality, good test-retest reliability, and was functional on the category rating scale. The FreKAQ-J was significantly correlated with pain in motion, disability, pain-related catastrophizing, fear of movement, and anxiety symptomatology. CONCLUSIONS: We developed FreKAQ-J by modifying the FreBAQ-J. The FreKAQ-J fits the Rasch measurement model well and is suitable for use in people with knee OA. Altered body perception may be worth evaluating when managing people with knee OA.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE; VALIDATION STUDIES


  7 / 792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27993558
Autor:Morasco BJ; Yarborough BJ; Smith NX; Dobscha SK; Deyo RA; Perrin NA; Green CA
Dirección:Center to Improve Veteran Involvement in Care, VA Portland Health Care System, Portland, Oregon; Department of Psychiatry, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon. Electronic address: benjamin.morasco@va.gov.
Título:Higher Prescription Opioid Dose is Associated With Worse Patient-Reported Pain Outcomes and More Health Care Utilization.
Fuente:J Pain; 18(4):437-445, 2017 Apr.
ISSN:1528-8447
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:Some previous research has examined pain-related variables on the basis of prescription opioid dose, but data from studies involving patient-reported outcomes have been limited. This study examined the relationships between prescription opioid dose and self-reported pain intensity, function, quality of life, and mental health. Participants were recruited from 2 large integrated health systems, Kaiser Permanente Northwest (n = 331) and VA Portland Health Care System (n = 186). To be included, participants had to have musculoskeletal pain diagnoses and be receiving stable doses of long-term opioid therapy. We divided participants into 3 groups on the basis of current prescription opioid dose in daily morphine equivalent dose (MED): low dose (5-20 mg MED), moderate dose (20.1-50 mg MED), and higher dose (50.1-120 mg MED) groups. A statistically significant trend emerged where higher prescription opioid dose was associated with moderately sized effects including greater pain intensity, more impairments in functioning and quality of life, poorer self-efficacy for managing pain, greater fear avoidance, and more health care utilization. Rates of potential alcohol and substance use disorders also differed among groups. Findings from this evaluation reveal significant differences in pain-related and substance-related factors on the basis of prescription opioid dose. PERSPECTIVE: This study included 517 patients who were prescribed long-term opioid therapy and compared differences on pain- and mental health-related variables on the basis of prescription opioid dose. Findings reveal small- to medium-sized differences on pain-related variables, alcohol and substance use, and health care utilization on the basis of the dose of opioid prescribed.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY
Nombre de substancia:0 (Analgesics, Opioid); 0 (Prescription Drugs)


  8 / 792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28582459
Autor:Ioannou LJ; Cameron PA; Gibson SJ; Gabbe BJ; Ponsford J; Jennings PA; Arnold CA; Gwini SM; Georgiou-Karistianis N; Giummarra MJ
Dirección:School of Psychological Sciences and Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, Monash University, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.
Título:Traumatic injury and perceived injustice: Fault attributions matter in a "no-fault" compensation state.
Fuente:PLoS One; 12(6):e0178894, 2017.
ISSN:1932-6203
País de publicación:United States
Idioma:eng
Resumen:BACKGROUND: Traumatic injury can lead to loss, suffering and feelings of injustice. Previous research has shown that perceived injustice is associated with poorer physical and mental wellbeing in persons with chronic pain. This study aimed to identify the relative association between injury, compensation and pain-related characteristics and perceived injustice 12-months after traumatic injury. METHODS: 433 participants were recruited from the Victorian Orthopedic Trauma Outcomes Registry and Victorian State Trauma Registry, and completed questionnaires at 12-14 months after injury as part of an observational cohort study. Using hierarchical linear regression we examined the relationships between baseline demographics (sex, age, education, comorbidities), injury (injury severity, hospital length of stay), compensation (compensation status, fault, lawyer involvement), and health outcomes (SF-12) and perceived injustice. We then examined how much additional variance in perceived injustice was related to worse pain severity, interference, self-efficacy, catastrophizing, kinesiophobia or disability. RESULTS: Only a small portion of variance in perceived injustice was related to baseline demographics (especially education level), and injury severity. Attribution of fault to another, consulting a lawyer, health-related quality of life, disability and the severity of pain-related cognitions explained the majority of variance in perceived injustice. While univariate analyses showed that compensable injury led to higher perceptions of injustice, this did not remain significant when adjusting for all other factors, including fault attribution and consulting a lawyer. CONCLUSIONS: In addition to the "justice" aspects of traumatic injury, the health impacts of injury, emotional distress related to pain (catastrophizing), and the perceived impact of pain on activity (pain self-efficacy), had stronger associations with perceptions of injustice than either injury or pain severity. To attenuate the likelihood of poor recovery from injury, clinical interventions that support restoration of health-related quality of life, and adjustment to the impacts of trauma are needed.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY


  9 / 792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28107898
Autor:Chisari C; Chilcot J
Dirección:Health Psychology Section, Psychology Department, Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience, King's College London, UK.
Título:The experience of pain severity and pain interference in vulvodynia patients: The role of cognitive-behavioural factors, psychological distress and fatigue.
Fuente:J Psychosom Res; 93:83-89, 2017 Feb.
ISSN:1879-1360
País de publicación:England
Idioma:eng
Resumen:OBJECTIVE: Vulvodynia is a chronic pain condition characterised by severe pain affecting the vulva. Biopsychosocial models have revealed the importance of illness perceptions, cognitive-behavioural variables and psychological distress in explaining the experience of pain and disability across several conditions. These factors have never been collectively examined in vulvodynia. We predicted that distress, fatigue, illness perceptions, and cognitive-behavioural factors would be associated with pain severity and interference among women with vulvodynia. METHODS: This online cross-sectional study recruited 335 vulvodynia patients from an Italian charity association (Vulvodiniapuntoinfo.com), who completed pain severity and interference measures in addition to the Hospital Anxiety and Depression scale, Revised Illness Perception Questionnaire, Chalder Fatigue Questionnaire, Cognitive-Behavioural Symptom Questionnaire and a demographic questionnaire. RESULTS: Hierarchical regression models controlling for demographic and illness characteristics, revealed that lower treatment control beliefs, greater illness identity, catastrophizing and psychological distress, were significant predictors of pain severity, explaining 35% of the variance. A second adjusted hierarchical regression model revealed that low treatment-control, higher fatigue, distress, and avoidance/resting behaviours were significant predictors of pain interference, explaining 48% of the variance. CONCLUSION: Distress, illness perceptions, fatigue, and cognitive-behavioural factors are associated with pain severity and interference in patients with vulvodynia, highlighting the importance of adopting a biopsychosocial approach in this setting. Future research should examine these factors over time to inform the development of future tailored interventions to help support women better manage vulvodynia.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  10 / 792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28107892
Autor:Rost S; Van Ryckeghem DM; Schulz A; Crombez G; Vögele C
Dirección:Institute for Health and Behaviour, INSIDE, University of Luxembourg, Luxembourg; Department of Experimental-Clinical and Health Psychology, Ghent University, Belgium. Electronic address: silke.rost@uni.lu.
Título:Generalized hypervigilance in fibromyalgia: Normal interoceptive accuracy, but reduced self-regulatory capacity.
Fuente:J Psychosom Res; 93:48-54, 2017 Feb.
ISSN:1879-1360
País de publicación:England
Idioma:eng
Resumen:OBJECTIVE: The factors underlying the aetiology of fibromyalgia (FM) are largely unknown. According to the generalized hypervigilance hypothesis (GHH), FM patients show excessive attention towards pain stimuli and other sensory events, thereby increasing pain perception and dysfunctional behaviour. We tested this notion by assessing interoceptive accuracy (IA) in FM patients and matched healthy controls. We also tested the hypothesis that FM is characterized by reduced self-regulatory capacity as indexed by heart rate variability (HRV). METHODS: 47 FM patients (M =45.5, 39 females) and 45 healthy controls (M =44.9, 37 females) completed several self-report scales (Body Vigilance Scale, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales, Pain Catastrophizing Scale). To derive HRV, heart rate was monitored under resting conditions; for the assessment of IA participants performed a heartbeat tracking task in which they were asked to silently count their heartbeats. RESULTS: FM patients reported higher body vigilance than healthy controls, but there were no group differences in IA. FM patients had lower HRV compared with healthy controls. HRV did not predictor IA. CONCLUSION: In conclusion, our findings do not support the hypothesis of generalized hypervigilance in FM patients. Patients reported a heightened focus on bodily sensations, which was not reflected in IA. It may be that hypervigilance is not a general and stable characteristic but is rather context dependent and modality-specific.
Tipo de publicación:JOURNAL ARTICLE



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