Database : MEDLINE
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PMID:28337680
Author:Jian R; Wang SW; Zhang WX; Zhang LP
Address:Key Laboratory of Animal Physiology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology of Hebei Province, College of Life Science, Hebei Normal University, Shijiazhuang, 050024, Hebei, People's Republic of China.
Title:Morphological and molecular identification of Habronema spp. (Nematoda: Habronematidae) from donkeys in Xinjiang, China, and notes on the taxonomical status of Habronema majus (Creplin, 1849) and H. microstoma (Schneider, 1866).
Source:Syst Parasitol; 94(4):511-525, 2017 May.
ISSN:1573-5192
Country of publication:Netherlands
Language:eng
Abstract:Habronematid nematodes were collected from the stomachs of donkeys, Equus asinus L., in the Tarim Basin, Xinjiang, China. After examination by light and scanning electron microscopy, Habronema muscae (Carter, 1861) and H. majus (Creplin, 1849) were identified. The morphology of our specimens representing H. muscae (Carter, 1861) agreed well with previous redescriptions in the shape of the lateral lips, origin of the lateral alae, ratio of left and right spicules, and number and arrangement of caudal papillae. However, H. majus (Creplin, 1849) differs from H. microstoma (Schneider, 1866) in the arrangement of the caudal papillae in the male. Moreover, molecular analysis also showed interspecific differences of 26.2-28.2% in ITS2 and 8.6-8.9% in cox1 between H. majus and H. microstoma, a divergence much higher than the known intraspecific variation of Habronema spp. (6.6-8.7% in ITS2; 0.2-2.2% in cox1). The results indicate that both H. microstoma (Schneider, 1866) and H. majus (Creplin, 1849) are valid species.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (DNA, Ribosomal Spacer); EC 1.9.3.1 (Electron Transport Complex IV)


  2 / 448 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28138043
Author:Libertin CR; Reza M; Peterson JH; Lewis J; Hata DJ
Address:Division of Infectious Diseases, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, Florida.
Title:Human Infection: Esophageal Symptoms and Need for Prolonged Albendazole Therapy.
Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg; 96(4):873-875, 2017 Apr.
ISSN:1476-1645
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:AbstractWe describe a case of human infection with acquired in southeast Georgia. The patient presented with intermittent yet persistent nausea and vomiting for months. This case describes the need for extraction of worms on two occasions each followed by courses of albendazole treatment. infections with high worm burden may relapse after extraction of the worm and a 3-day short course of albendazole therapy. Longer courses of albendazole may be indicated in selected circumstances.
Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Anthelmintics); F4216019LN (Albendazole)


  3 / 448 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27902893
Author:Macedo LC; Gardner SL; Melo FTV; Giese EG; Santos JN
Address:* Laboratório de Biologia Celular e Helmintologia, Profa. Dra. Reinalda Marisa Lanfredi, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Federal do Pará, Av. Augusto Corrêa s/n, Belém, Pará, 66075-110, Brazil.
Title:Nematodes Parasites of Teiid Lizards from the Brazilian Amazon Rainforest.
Source:J Parasitol; 103(2):176-182, 2017 Apr.
ISSN:1937-2345
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:This study presents the helminth composition and parameters of infection by several species of nematodes in teiid lizards, Ameiva ameiva ameiva (Linnaeus, 1758), Cnemidophorus cryptus Cole and Dessauer, 1993, and Kentropyx calcarata Spix, 1825 from the Brazilian Amazonian Rainforest. The population of lizards studied were parasitized by 6 species of Phylum Nemata including: Spinicauda spinicauda (Olfers, 1919), Parapharyngodon alvarengai Freitas, 1957, Physaloptera sp. (adults), Physaloptera sp. (larvae), Piratuba digiticauda Lent and Freitas, 1941, and Anisakidae (larvae). The overall prevalence was 66.17% and the mean intensity of infection was 19.40 ± 25.48. The association between the body-length of lizards and the abundance and richness of parasitic nematodes was statistically significant only in Ameiva a. ameiva. A new host record is reported here with 1 specimen of the family Anasakidae in Ameiva a. ameiva. Both S. spinicauda and Physaloptera sp. represent new records from C. cryptus.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  4 / 448 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27817010
Author:Schuster RK; Sivakumar S
Address:Central Veterinary Research Laboratory, PO Box 957, Dubai, United Arab Emirates. r.schuster@cvrl.ae.
Title:The larval development of Habronema muscae (Nematoda: Habronematidae) affects its intermediate host, Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae).
Source:Parasitol Res; 116(2):503-509, 2017 Feb.
ISSN:1432-1955
Country of publication:Germany
Language:eng
Abstract:Although the life cycle of the equid stomach parasite Habronema muscae was disclosed more than 100 years ago, little is known about the effect of the developing nematode larvae in its intermediate host, Musca domestica. In a series of experiments, freshly hatched M. domestica larvae were exposed to H. muscae eggs contained in a faecal sample of a naturally infected horse. In daily intervals, 50 fly larvae were removed and transferred on a parasite-free larval rearing medium where they completed their development. Hatched flies were examined for the presence of Habronema third-stage larvae. In two subsequent control groups, flies spend their entire larval life in contaminated horse faeces and in a parasite-free larval rearing medium, respectively. Out of the 700 fly larvae used in the infection experiments, 304 developed into adult flies of which 281 were infected. The average nematode larval burden rose from 3.6 in the group with the shortest exposure to more than 25 in the groups with the longest exposure. The proportion of larvae that developed into the adult insect fell from 82 % in the uninfected control group to 27 % in the positive control group. The pupae of the positive control group were smaller and lighter than those of the uninfected control group. Lower pupal size and weight in the positive control group as well as a lower insect developing rate might be attributed to the destruction of adipose cells in the maggots by Habronema larvae.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  5 / 448 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27615321
Author:Moravec F; Gey D; Justine JL
Address:Institute of Parasitology, Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Branisovská 31, 370 05 Ceské Budejovice, Czech Republic.
Title:Nématodes parasites de quatre espèces de Carangoides (Osteichthyes: Carangidae) des eaux de Nouvelle-Calédonie, avec description de Philometra dispar n. sp. (Philometridae). Nematode parasites of four species of Carangoides (Osteichthyes: Carangidae) in New Caledonian waters, with a description of Philometra dispar n. sp. (Philometridae).
Source:Parasite; 23:40, 2016.
ISSN:1776-1042
Country of publication:France
Language:eng
Abstract:Parasitological examination of marine perciform fishes belonging to four species of Carangoides, i.e. C. chrysophrys, C. dinema, C. fulvoguttatus and C. hedlandensis (Carangidae), from off New Caledonia revealed the presence of nematodes. The identification of carangids was confirmed by barcoding of the COI gene. The eight nematode species found were: Capillariidae gen. sp. (females), Cucullanus bulbosus (Lane, 1916) (male and females), Hysterothylacium sp. third-stage larvae, Raphidascaris (Ichthyascaris) sp. (female and larvae), Terranova sp. third-stage larvae, Philometra dispar n. sp. (male), Camallanus carangis Olsen, 1954 (females) and Johnstonmawsonia sp. (female). The new species P. dispar from the abdominal cavity of C. dinema is mainly characterised by the body length (5.14 mm), the lengths of markedly unequal spicules (163 and 96 µm) and gubernaculum (102 µm long) provided with a dorsal protuberance and a small, reflexed dorsal barb on its posterior portion. The finding of C. bulbosus represents the first record of this parasite a century after its discovery; the first study of this species by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) enabled detailed redescription. The finding of Johnstonmawsonia sp. in C. fulvoguttatus is the first record of a rhabdochonid nematode from a host belonging to the Carangidae family. Johnstonmawsonia africana Moravec & Puylaert, 1970 and J. campanae Puylaert, 1973 are transferred to Prosungulonema Roytman, 1963 as P. africanum (Moravec & Puylaert, 1970) comb. n. and P. campanae (Puylaert, 1973) n. comb.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  6 / 448 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27539725
Author:Morsy K; Bashtar AR; Al Quraishy S; Adel S
Address:Department of Zoology, Faculty of Science, Cairo University, Giza, Egypt.
Title:Description of two equine nematodes, Parascaris equorum Goeze 1782 and Habronema microstoma Schneider 1866 from the domestic horse Equus ferus caballus (Famisly: Equidae) in Egypt.
Source:Parasitol Res; 115(11):4299-4306, 2016 Nov.
ISSN:1432-1955
Country of publication:Germany
Language:eng
Abstract:Parasitic gastroenteritis (PGE) caused by infection of the gut with parasitic nematodes is one of the most important diseases of livestock animals from both financial and welfare perspectives. Parascaris equorum and Habronema microstoma are of the most endemic nematodes of the world which are currently the major cause of PGE of the domestic horses in Egypt. The present investigation introduced the first morphological description of these nematodes recovered from the domestic horse, Equus ferus caballus (Equidae), in Egypt by light and scanning electron microscopy. Seven P. equorum (fifth stage) and 18 adults of H. microstoma were recovered from the gastrointestinal tracts of four young domestic horses collected during the year of 2015. Microscopic examination of the isolated fifth stage P. equorum revealed that it possessed a long body with a broad anterior end equipped by large shamrock-like lips with deep transverse groove on medial surface set off from the rest of the body by a deep post-labial constriction giving the body a shouldered appearance. The total body length was 12-15 (14 ± 2) cm for males and 13-18 (16 ± 2) cm for females. Lips were three in number in the form of one dorsal and two sub-ventral surrounding the central stoma. The isolated adult worms of H. microstoma were whitish in color narrowed slightly at the anterior end. Single lateral ala in the cephalic region in both sexes was observed. The buccal vestibule was markedly thickened and equipped by two tridentate teeth. The adult worms had two bilobed lateral lips surrounding the mouth with four sub-median cephalic papillae and two amphids. The males were 14.5-18.0 (17.2 ± 0.3) mm long and 1.23-1.57 (1.42 ± 0.3) mm wide. The posterior end was spirally coiled and had wide caudal alae. The spicules were unequal. The females were 13.5-21.0 (16.2 ± 0.3) mm long and 1.55-1.75 (1.69 ± 0.3) mm wide. The anal pore had a thin upper rim and was located 177.0 µm from the posterior end.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  7 / 448 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27394819
Author:Kinsella JM; Robles Mdel R; Preisser WC
Address:HelmWest Laboratory, 2108 Hilda Ave., Missoula, Montana 59801; U.S.A.; Email: wormdwb@aol.com.
Title:A review of Gongylonema spp. (Nematoda: Gongylonematidae) in North American rodents with description of a new species from the cotton rat, Sigmodon hispidus (Mammalia: Cricetidae).
Source:Zootaxa; 4107(2):277-84, 2016 May 02.
ISSN:1175-5334
Country of publication:New Zealand
Language:eng
Abstract:Gongylonema archboldi n. sp. (Nematoda: Gongylonematidae) is described from tunnels in the gastric mucosa of the stomach of the cotton rat (Sigmodon hispidus) from Highlands County, Florida, U.S.A. Measurements are also given for specimens from cotton mice (Peromyscus gossypinus), oldfield mice (Peromyscus polionotus), Florida mice (Podomys floridanus), and golden mice (Ochrotomys nuttalli) from the same locality. Additional specimens were collected from the cotton rat and the rice rat (Oryzomys palustris) from Berry Island, San Patricio County, Texas. The new species is differentiated from congeners by a combination of the following characters: length of the left spicule, length and shape of the gubernaculum, distribution of cuticular bosses, length of esophagus, and distance of the vulva from the posterior end. The status of the genus Gongylonema in North American rodents is reviewed.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  8 / 448 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27078651
Author:Moravec F; Pachanawan A; Kamchoo K
Title:Redescription of two species of cystidicolid nematodes (Spirurina: Cystidicolidae) from Notopterus notopterus (Osteichthyes) in Thailand.
Source:Acta Parasitol; 61(2):278-90, 2016 Mar.
ISSN:1896-1851
Country of publication:Poland
Language:eng
Abstract:Two nematode species, Pseudoproleptus notopteri (Karve et Naik, 1951) and Spinitectus notopteri Karve et Naik, 1951 (both Cystidicolidae), are redescribed based on light and scanning electron microscopical studies of specimens collected from the digestive tract of the freshwater fish Notopterus notopterus (Pallas) (Notopteridae, Osteoglossiformes) in Thailand. Some new important morphological features, such as a detailed structure of the cephalic end and the presence of bifurcate deirids and a ventral median caudal protuberance in male, are reported for the former species (P. notopteri), which is provisionally assigned to Pseudoproleptus Khera, 1955; Notopteroides notopteri Chakravarty et Majumdar, 1962, Pseudoproleptus satendri Sahay, 1967, P. lamyi Le-Van-Hoa et Bui-Thi Lien-Huong, 1969, P. gomtii Gupta et Bakshi, 1984. P. sprenti Gupta et Masoodi, 1986 and P. thapari Gupta et Naiyer, 1992 are considered its junior synonyms. The first study of S. notopteri by SEM showed its morphological similarity with S. mastacembeli Karve et Naik, 1951, from which it clearly differs by the structure of eggs; Spinitectus alii Kalyankar, 1970, S. bengalensis Chakravarty, Sain et Majumdar, 1961, S. gomalensis Siddiqui et Kattak, 1984 and S. thapari Ali, 1957 are considered to be junior synonyms of S. notopteri. Pseudoproleptus notopteri and Spinitectus notopteri are reported from Thailand for the first time.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T


  9 / 448 MEDLINE  
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PMID:26890538
Author:Huang Q; Wang J; Yang T; Liu Y
Address:Department of Gastroenterology, Peking University People's Hospital, Beijing, China.
Title:Multiple Gongylonema pulchrum worms in a human esophagus.
Source:Endoscopy; 48 Suppl 1 UCTN:E24-5, 2016.
ISSN:1438-8812
Country of publication:Germany
Language:eng
Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE


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PMID:26856641
Author:Morris T; Avenant-Oldewage A; Lamberth S; Reed C
Address:Department of Biological Sciences, University of Cape Town, Private Bag X3, Rondebosch, Cape Town 7701, South Africa.
Title:Shark parasites as bio-indicators of metals in two South African embayments.
Source:Mar Pollut Bull; 104(1-2):221-8, 2016 Mar 15.
ISSN:1879-3363
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:Concentrations of metals in the tissues of the sharks Callorhinchus capensis, Rhinobatos annulatus and Rhinobatos blochii collected in False Bay and Saldanha Bay, South Africa, in 2013 were investigated. Metal concentrations in the tissue of the parasites Gyrocotyle plana infecting the spiral intestine of C. capensis and Proleptus obtusus infecting the stomach of R. annulatus and R. blochii were also analysed. G. plana showed accumulation of arsenic (4073.52±5561.54 µg/g), manganese (522.16±578.21 µg/g), lead (64.87±101.7 µg/g), titanium (1821.42±1348.16 µg/g) and zinc (12439.57±9743.60 µg/g). These results when compared to baseline values, showed that accumulation of the metals in G. plana are orders of magnitude higher than those in the surrounding environment and 2 to 6 times the concentration of the surrounding host's tissues. These results show the usefulness of marine endoparasites as early warning indicators of heavy metal pollution.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Name of substance:0 (Metals, Heavy); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical)



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