Database : MEDLINE
Search on : B01.650.940.800.575.912.063.222 [DeCS Category]
References found : 32 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Large]

page 1 of 4 go to page            

  1 / 32 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
PMID:28438702
Author:Hennequin S; Rouhan G; Salino A; Duan YF; Lepeigneux MC; Guillou M; Ansell S; Almeida TE; Zhang LB; Schneider H
Address:Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Sorbonne Universités, UMR 7205 CNRS-MNHN-UPMC-EPHE "Institut de Systématique, Evolution, Biodiversité - ISYEB", 57 rue Cuvier, CP48, 75005 Paris, France. Electronic address: sabine.hennequin@upmc.fr.
Title:Global phylogeny and biogeography of the fern genus Ctenitis (Dryopteridaceae), with a focus on the Indian Ocean region.
Source:Mol Phylogenet Evol; 112:277-289, 2017 Jul.
ISSN:1095-9513
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:The diverse and pantropical genus Ctenitis, in the Dryopteridaceae, has been largely ignored in phylogenetic studies until now. In this study, we fill in this gap by reconstructing the first comprehensive phylogeny of the genus including 53 species currently recognized in the genus Ctenitis, among which seven species formerly were assigned to the genus Pseudotectaria and one to Heterogonium. Special emphasis was given to the sampling of species occurring in the African-Indian Ocean region. The presented results include reconstruction of a biogeographic scenario based on estimated divergence times and ancestral area reconstruction. Our findings confirm the inclusion, within Ctenitis, of the Indian Ocean species formerly placed in Pseudotectaria and Heterogonium. The crown group divergence was estimated to date back to the Oligocene or Early Miocene. The biogeographical scenario indicates an initial divergence of the Asian-Pacific ranges and the neotropical ranges, and a subsequent colonization of the Afro-Madagascan region by a lineage with neotropical ancestors. The Afro-Madagascan lineage splits into a lineage endemic to the Mascarene islands and a lineage occurring in Madagascar, the Comoros and Africa. The range expansion towards Africa and Madagascar was estimated to date back to the late Miocene, whereas the estimated ages for the onset of the diversification of the Mascarene diversity is consistent with the ages of these young, volcanic islands. The absence of any extant species of Ctenitis with a multi-continental distribution range and the rarity of inter-island dispersal and speciation in the Indian Ocean region suggest a limited contribution of long distance dispersal to the biogeographical history of this fern genus, versus a high contribution of local speciation.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  2 / 32 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
PMID:27706257
Author:Imai R; Tsuda Y; Matsumoto S; Ebihara A; Watano Y
Address:Department of Biology, Graduate School of Science, Chiba University, Yayoi, Inage, Chiba, Japan.
Title:The Relationship between Mating System and Genetic Diversity in Diploid Sexual Populations of Cyrtomium falcatum in Japan.
Source:PLoS One; 11(10):e0163683, 2016.
ISSN:1932-6203
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:The impact of variation in mating system on genetic diversity is a well-debated topic in evolutionary biology. The diploid sexual race of Cyrtomium falcatum (Japanese holly fern) shows mating system variation, i.e., it displays two different types of sexual expression (gametangia formation) in gametophytes: mixed (M) type and separate (S) type. We examined whether there is variation in the selfing rate among populations of this species, and evaluated the relationship between mating system, genetic diversity and effective population size using microsatellites. In this study, we developed eight new microsatellite markers and evaluated genetic diversity and structure of seven populations (four M-type and three S-type). Past effective population sizes (Ne) were inferred using Approximate Bayesian computation (ABC). The values of fixation index (FIS), allelic richness (AR) and gene diversity (h) differed significantly between the M-type (FIS: 0.626, AR: 1.999, h: 0.152) and the S-type (FIS: 0.208, AR: 2.718, h: 0.367) populations (when admixed individuals were removed from two populations). Although evidence of past bottleneck events was detected in all populations by ABC, the current Ne of the M-type populations was about a third of that of the S-type populations. These results suggest that the M-type populations have experienced more frequent bottlenecks, which could be related to their higher colonization ability via gametophytic selfing. Although high population differentiation among populations was detected (FST = 0.581, F'ST = 0.739), there was no clear genetic differentiation between the M- and S-types. Instead, significant isolation by distance was detected among all populations. These results suggest that mating system variation in this species is generated by the selection for single spore colonization during local extinction and recolonization events and there is no genetic structure due to mating system.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (DNA, Plant)


  3 / 32 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
PMID:26944012
Author:Le Péchon T; Zhang L; He H; Zhou XM; Bytebier B; Gao XF; Zhang LB
Address:Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 416, Chengdu, Sichuan 610041, China; School of Life Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Private Bag X01, Scottsville, Pietermaritzburg 3209, South Africa. Electronic address: tlepechon@gmail.com.
Title:A well-sampled phylogenetic analysis of the polystichoid ferns (Dryopteridaceae) suggests a complex biogeographical history involving both boreotropical migrations and recent transoceanic dispersals.
Source:Mol Phylogenet Evol; 98:324-36, 2016 May.
ISSN:1095-9513
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:Intercontinental disjunctions in ferns have often been considered as the result of long-distance dispersal (LDD) events rather than of vicariance. However, in many leptosporangiate groups, both processes appear to have played a major role in shaping current geographical distribution. In this study, we reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships and inferred the ancestral distribution areas of the polystichoid ferns (Cyrtomium, Phanerophlebia, and Polystichum), to evaluate the relative impact of vicariance and LDD on the biogeography of this group. We used a molecular dataset including 3346 characters from five plastid loci. With 190 accessions our taxon coverage was about three times as large as any previous worldwide sampling. Biogeographical analyses were performed using S-DIVA and S-DEC and divergence times were estimated by integrating fossil and secondary calibrations. The polystichoid ferns are a monophyletic clade that may have originated in East Asia during the Eocene, an age much younger than previously estimated. Three transoceanic disjunctions between East Asia and New World were identified in the Paleogene: one for Phanerophlebia during late Eocene (34Ma, 19-51Ma), and two in Polystichum at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary (30Ma, 18-43Ma; 28Ma, 19-39Ma respectively). During the Neogene, further range expansions took place from Asia to Africa, Hawaii, and the Southwestern Indian Ocean region. Our results indicate that early transfers between the Old and the New World are compatible with a boreotropical migration scenario. After evolving in Asia during the Eocene, the polystichoid ferns reached the New World in independent migrations at the Eocene-Oligocene boundary through the boreotropical belt. However, although less likely, the alternative hypothesis of independent transoceanic dispersals from the Old to the New World cannot be ruled out. Further range expansion during the Neogene was most likely the result of long-distance dispersal (LDD).
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T


  4 / 32 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text
PMID:26928720
Author:Le Péchon T; He H; Zhang L; Zhou XM; Gao XF; Zhang LB
Address:Chengdu Institute of Biology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 416, Chengdu, Sichuan, 610041, China. tlepechon@gmail.com.
Title:Using a multilocus phylogeny to test morphology-based classifications of Polystichum (Dryopteridaceae), one of the largest fern genera.
Source:BMC Evol Biol; 16:55, 2016 Feb 29.
ISSN:1471-2148
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: Polystichum (Dryopteridaceae) is probably the third largest fern genus in the world and contains ca. 500 species. Species of Polystichum occur on all continents except Antarctica, but its highest diversity is found in East Asia, especially Southwest China and adjacent regions. Previous studies typically had sparse taxon sampling and used limited DNA sequence data. Consequently, the majority of morphological hypotheses/classifications have never been tested using molecular data. RESULTS: In this study, DNA sequences of five plastid loci of 177 accessions representing ca. 140 species of Polystichum and 13 species of the closely related genera were used to infer a phylogeny using maximum likelihood, Bayesian inference, and maximum parsimony. Our analyses show that (1) Polystichum is monophyletic, this being supported by not only molecular data but also morphological features and distribution information; (2) Polystichum is resolved into two strongly supported monophyletic clades, corresponding to the two subgenera, P. subg. Polystichum and P. subg. Haplopolystichum; (3) Accessions of P. subg. Polystichum are resolved into three major clades: clade K (P. sect. Xiphophyllum), clade L (P. sect. Polystichum), and the HYMASO superclade dominated by accessions of P. sect. Hypopeltis, P. sect. Macropolystichum, and P. sect. Sorolepidium, while those of P. subg. Haplopolystichum are resolved into eight major clades; and (4) The monophyly of the Afra clade (weakly supported), the Australasian clade (weakly supported), and the North American clade (strongly supported) is confirmed. CONCLUSIONS: Of the 23 sections of Polystichum recognized in a recent classification of the genus, four (P. sect. Hypopeltis, P. sect. Neopolystichum, P. sect. Sorolepidium, P. sect. Sphaenopolystichum) are resolved as non-monophyletic, 16 are recovered as monophyletic, and three are monospecific. Of the 16 monophyletic sections, two (P. sect. Adenolepia, P. sect. Cyrtogonellum) are weakly supported and 14 are strongly supported as monophyletic. The relationships of 11 sections (five in P. subg. Haplopolystichum; six in P. subg. Polystichum) are well resolved.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Name of substance:0 (DNA, Plant)


  5 / 32 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
PMID:24960181
Author:Ren Z; He C; Fan Y; Guo L; Si H; Wang Y; Shi Z; Zhang H
Address:College of Veterinary Medicine, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China.
Title:Immuno-enhancement effects of ethanol extract from Cyrtomium macrophyllum (Makino) Tagawa on cyclophosphamide-induced immunosuppression in BALB/c mice.
Source:J Ethnopharmacol; 155(1):769-75, 2014 Aug 08.
ISSN:1872-7573
Country of publication:Ireland
Language:eng
Abstract:ETHNOPHARMACOLOGICAL RELEVANCE: Cyrtomium macrophyllum (Makino) Tagawa has been traditionally used as a herbal medicine for the treatment of various infectious diseases such as tapeworm infestation, colds, and viral diseases. However, no systematic study of the immunity of Cyrtomium macrophyllum ethanol extracts (CM) has yet been reported. The present work evaluates these traits. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 120 male BALB/c mice were divided into 6 groups of 20 mice each: (1) normal group (sterile physiological saline), which served as a blank control; (2) model group (Cyclophosphamide, CY) group (sterile physiological saline), which served as a negative control; (3) low-dose CM (50 mg/kg BW); (4) intermediate-dose CM (100 mg/kg BW); (5) high-dose CM (200 mg/kg BW); (6) CM group (200 mg/kg BW). CY (0.2 ml) was administered via intraperitoneal injection. The other regimens were administered via gavage in 0.2 ml solution. Phytochemical of CM was characterized by HPLC-LTQ-Orbitrap. The acute toxicity effect of the ethanol extract of Cyrtomium macrophyllum was also investigated. RESULTS: The spleen and thymus indices of mice receiving low, intermediate, and high doses of CM recovered more quickly than those of CY mice, and they did so in a dose-dependent manner. These mice also showed higher T cell and B cell proliferation responses and macrophage function than those of CY mice, and their serum levels of interleukin-6 and interferon-γ had become normal. In acute toxicity test, CM exhibited no mortality and behavioral changes in mice. Quantitative phytochemical analysis showed flavonoids, polyphenols, and tannins to be the major compounds present in the extract, at 27.64%, 30.87%, and 11.22%, respectively. We found that 16 compounds were characterized by the interpretation of their mass spectra obtained by the MS/MS. CONCLUSION: The current study demonstrates that Cyrtomium macrophyllum ethanol extract improved immune function in CY-treated mice.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Name of substance:0 (Immunosuppressive Agents); 0 (Plant Extracts); 3K9958V90M (Ethanol); 8N3DW7272P (Cyclophosphamide)


  6 / 32 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
PMID:23944953
Author:Zhang D; Li SB; Yang L; Li YJ; Zhu XX; Kmonícková E; Zídek Z; Fu MH; Fang J
Address:a Institute of Chinese Materia Medica, China Academy of Chinese Medical Sciences , Beijing , 100700 , China.
Title:Two new C-methyl flavanones from the rhizomes and frond bases of Matteuccia struthiopteris.
Source:J Asian Nat Prod Res; 15(11):1163-7, 2013 Nov.
ISSN:1477-2213
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:Two new C-methyl flavanones, (2S)-5,7-dihydroxy-6,8-dimethyl-4'-methoxydihydroflavone-7-O-(6″-O-acetyl)-ß-d-glucopyranoside (1) and (2S)-5,7-dihydroxy-6,8-dimethyldihydroflavone-7-O-(6″-O-acetyl)-ß-d-glucopyranoside (2), together with five known compounds, demethoxymatteucinol-7-O-ß-d-glucopyranoside (3), matteucinol-7-O-ß-d-glucopyranoside (4), 5,7-dihydroxy-6-methyl-4'-methoxydihydroflavone (5), methoxymatteucin (6), and thunberginol C (7), were first isolated from the EtOH extract of the rhizomes and frond bases of Matteuccia struthiopteris. The structures were established by spectral analyses, mainly HR-ESI-MS and 1D and 2D NMR experiments (COSY, HSQC, and HMBC).
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Name of substance:0 ((2S)-5,7-dihydroxy-6,8-dimethyl-4'-methoxydihydroflavone-7-O-(6''-O-acetyl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside); 0 ((2S)-5,7-dihydroxy-6,8-dimethyldihydroflavone-7-O-(6''-O-acetyl)-beta-D-glucopyranoside); 0 (Drugs, Chinese Herbal); 0 (Flavanones); 0 (Glucosides)


  7 / 32 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
PMID:23647016
Author:Chung MY; Chung MG
Address:Department of Biology and the Research Institute of Natural Science, Gyeongsang National University, Jinju, South Korea.
Title:Significant spatial aggregation and fine-scale genetic structure in the homosporous fern Cyrtomium falcatum (Dryopteridaceae).
Source:New Phytol; 199(3):663-72, 2013 Aug.
ISSN:1469-8137
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:Spores of homosporous ferns are small, wind-borne and thus have the potential for long-distance dispersal. This common perception has led to a prediction of near-random spatial genetic structure within fern populations. Spore dispersal and spore bank studies, however, indicate that most spores fall close to the maternal plant (< 5 m), supporting a prediction of significant fine-scale genetic structure (FSGS) within populations. To determine which of these two hypotheses is more likely to occur in nature, we measured inbreeding and quantified the spatial distribution of individuals and allozyme-based genotypes using spatial autocorrelation methods within four populations of the fern Cyrtomium falcatum in southern South Korea. Inbreeding levels were low, and all populations exhibited significant aggregation of individuals and strong FSGS. The present results support the second hypothesis, and the substantial FSGS in C. falcatum could reflect the unique features of most homosporous ferns (outcrossing mating systems that lead a majority of spores to occur at short distances and a very limited dispersal distance of male gametes). Although fern spores are physically analogous to orchid seeds, the intensity of FSGS exhibited in C. falcatum is four times stronger than that in 16 terrestrial orchid species.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T


  8 / 32 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text
PMID:23516499
Author:Kloepper JW; McInroy JA; Liu K; Hu CH
Address:Department of Entomology and Plant Pathology, Auburn University, Auburn, Alabama, United States of America. kloepjw@auburn.edu
Title:Symptoms of Fern Distortion Syndrome resulting from inoculation with opportunistic endophytic fluorescent Pseudomonas spp.
Source:PLoS One; 8(3):e58531, 2013.
ISSN:1932-6203
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: Fern Distortion Syndrome (FDS) is a serious disease of Leatherleaf fern (Rumohra adiantiformis). The main symptom of FDS is distortion of fronds, making them unmarketable. Additional symptoms include stunting, irregular sporulation, decreased rhizome diameter, and internal discoloration of rhizomes. We previously reported an association of symptoms with increased endophytic rhizome populations of fluorescent pseudomonads (FPs). The aim of the current study was to determine if FPs from ferns in Costa Rica with typical FDS symptoms would recreate symptoms of FDS. METHODOLOGY AND FINDINGS: Greenhouse tests were conducted over a 29-month period. Micro-propagated ferns derived from tissue culture were first grown one year to produce rhizomes. Then, using an 8×9 randomized complete block experimental design, 8 replicate rhizomes were inoculated by dipping into 9 different treatments before planting. Treatments included water without bacteria (control), and four different groups of FPs, each at a two concentrations. The four groups of FPs included one group from healthy ferns without symptoms (another control treatment), two groups isolated from inside rhizomes of symptomatic ferns, and one group isolated from inside roots of symptomatic ferns. Symptoms were assessed 12 and 17 months later, and populations of FPs inside newly formed rhizomes were determined after 17 months. Results showed that inoculation with mixtures of FPs from ferns with FDS symptoms, but not from healthy ferns, recreated the primary symptom of frond deformities and also the secondary symptoms of irregular sporulation, decreased rhizome diameter, and internal discoloration of rhizomes. CONCLUSIONS: These results suggest a model of causation of FDS in which symptoms result from latent infections by multiple species of opportunistic endophytic bacteria containing virulence genes that are expressed when populations inside the plant reach a minimum level.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Name of substance:0 (Indoleacetic Acids); 0 (Pectins); 6U1S09C61L (indoleacetic acid); 89NA02M4RX (pectin)


  9 / 32 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PubMed Central Full text
Full text
PMID:23387904
Author:Kamika I; Momba MN
Address:Department of Environmental, Water and Earth Sciences, Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Arcadia Campus, Private Bag X680, Pretoria 0001, South Africa.
Title:Assessing the resistance and bioremediation ability of selected bacterial and protozoan species to heavy metals in metal-rich industrial wastewater.
Source:BMC Microbiol; 13:28, 2013 Feb 06.
ISSN:1471-2180
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: Heavy-metals exert considerable stress on the environment worldwide. This study assessed the resistance to and bioremediation of heavy-metals by selected protozoan and bacterial species in highly polluted industrial-wastewater. Specific variables (i.e. chemical oxygen demand, pH, dissolved oxygen) and the growth/die-off-rates of test organisms were measured using standard methods. Heavy-metal removals were determined in biomass and supernatant by the Inductively Couple Plasma Optical Emission Spectrometer. A parallel experiment was performed with dead microbial cells to assess the biosorption ability of test isolates. RESULTS: The results revealed that the industrial-wastewater samples were highly polluted with heavy-metal concentrations exceeding by far the maximum limits (in mg/l) of 0.05-Co, 0.2-Ni, 0.1-Mn, 0.1-V, 0.01-Pb, 0.01-Cu, 0.1-Zn and 0.005-Cd, prescribed by the UN-FAO. Industrial-wastewater had no major effects on Pseudomonas putida, Bacillus licheniformis and Peranema sp. (growth rates up to 1.81, 1.45 and 1.43 d-1, respectively) compared to other test isolates. This was also revealed with significant COD increases (p < 0.05) in culture media inoculated with living bacterial isolates (over 100%) compared to protozoan isolates (up to 24% increase). Living Pseudomonas putida demonstrated the highest removal rates of heavy metals (Co-71%, Ni-51%, Mn-45%, V-83%, Pb-96%, Ti-100% and Cu-49%) followed by Bacillus licheniformis (Al-23% and Zn-53%) and Peranema sp. (Cd-42%). None of the dead cells were able to remove more than 25% of the heavy metals. Bacterial isolates contained the genes copC, chrB, cnrA3 and nccA encoding the resistance to Cu, Cr, Co-Ni and Cd-Ni-Co, respectively. Protozoan isolates contained only the genes encoding Cu and Cr resistance (copC and chrB genes). Peranema sp. was the only protozoan isolate which had an additional resistant gene cnrA3 encoding Co-Ni resistance. CONCLUSION: Significant differences (p < 0.05) observed between dead and living microbial cells for metal-removal and the presence of certain metal-resistant genes indicated that the selected microbial isolates used both passive (biosorptive) and active (bioaccumulation) mechanisms to remove heavy metals from industrial wastewater. This study advocates the use of Peranema sp. as a potential candidate for the bioremediation of heavy-metals in wastewater treatment, in addition to Pseudomonas putida and Bacillus licheniformis.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Name of substance:0 (Industrial Waste); 0 (Metals, Heavy); 0 (Waste Water)


  10 / 32 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
PMID:22803388
Author:Wang M; Zhao K; Wang R
Address:Department of Clinical Medicine, Anqing Medical and Pharmaceutical College, Anqing 246000, China. jeany663@sohu.com
Title:[Textual research on original plant of Chinese herbal medicine Cyrtomium Rhizome].
Source:Zhongguo Zhong Yao Za Zhi; 37(9):1337-40, 2012 May.
ISSN:1001-5302
Country of publication:China
Language:chi
Abstract:Through studies on morphological characteristics, distribution and ecological habitat described in ancient literatures, Osmunda japonica is believed to the original plant of Chinese herbal medicine Cyrtomium Rhizome. Meanwhile, analysis is also made on causes for descriptions that do not comply with characteristics of O. japonica such as toxicity, flowers and fruits, illustrations, indumentums and flakes as well as appearance of other original plants. It is suggested to list O. japonica as the only original plant of Cyrtomium Rhizome and distinguish it from other frequently seen medical plants. Separated studies are also conducted for pesticide effect and active ingredients of Dryoteris Crassrhizomae Rhizome and Woodwardia japonica that show better effects.
Publication type:ENGLISH ABSTRACT; JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Drugs, Chinese Herbal)



page 1 of 4 go to page            
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information