Database : MEDLINE
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  1 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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PMID:29384908
Author:Tariq H; Kamal MU; Reddy P; Bajantri B; Niazi M; Matela A; Zeana C; Ihimoyan A; Dev A; Chilimuri S
Address:Department of Medicine.
Title:Anemia, intractable vomiting, chronic diarrhea, and syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic secretion: a diagnostic dilemma: Disseminated strongyloidosis in a patient with newly diagnosed HTLV infection-case report and review of literature.
Source:Medicine (Baltimore); 96(52):e9229, 2017 Dec.
ISSN:1536-5964
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:RATIONALE: Strongyloidiasis hyperinfection and disseminated disease have high mortality rates due to several complications and early detection of Strongyloides infection is therefore prudent. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 37-year-old male patient came with chronic diarrhea, intractable vomiting and was found to have hyponatremia, and anemia on the initial laboratory tests. DIAGNOSES: Further work up revealed syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic secretion to be the cause of the hyponatremia in addition to gastrointestinal loses. His hospital course was complicated by persistent hyponatremia and later development of partial small bowel obstruction. INTERVENTIONS: Considering his symptoms we had a suspicion of small bowel pathology for which he underwent an esophagogastroduodenoscopywith biopsies that revealed strongyloidosis as the cause of his symptoms. He was also found to have human T-cell lymphotropic virus infection, likely contributing to the disseminated disease. OUTCOMES: He was started on ivermectin with complete resolution of symptoms and improvement of hyponatremia. LESSONS: It is very important to suspect Strongyloides infection in a patient presenting with syndrome ofinappropriate antidiuretic secretion as hyperinfection and disseminated disease can be life threatening without antihelmintic therapy.
Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE; REVIEW


  2 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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PMID:29284005
Author:Belhassen-García M; Alonso-Sardón M; Martinez-Perez A; Soler C; Carranza-Rodriguez C; Pérez-Arellano JL; Muro A; Salvador F; Soil-Transmitted Helminths Study Group of the SEMTSI
Address:Servicio de Medicina Interna, Sección de Enfermedades Infecciosas, Complejo Asistencial Salamanca (CAUSA), Salamanca, Spain.
Title:Surveillance of strongyloidiasis in Spanish in-patients (1998-2014).
Source:PLoS One; 12(12):e0189449, 2017.
ISSN:1932-6203
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: Strongyloides stercoralis is a parasite that causes strongyloidiasis, a neglected tropical disease. S. stercoralis is a soil-transmitted helminth that is widely distributed in tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Strongyloidiasis can occur without any symptoms or as a chronic infection characterized by mild, unspecific symptoms such as pruritus, abdominal pain or discomfort; respiratory impairment also may manifest as a potentially fatal hyperinfection or disseminated infection. Most studies on strongyloidiasis in Spain have been related to chronic forms in immigrants or travellers from endemic zones and have mainly analysed out-patient populations. Studies of the impact of strongyloidiasis cases admitted to hospitals in Spain are lacking. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyse the impact of strongyloidiasis in hospital care in Spain. METHODOLOGY: We designed a retrospective descriptive study using the Minimum Basic Data Set (MBDS, CMBD in Spanish) for inpatients with ICD-9: 127.2 (strongyloidiasis) diagnoses admitted to hospitals in the Spanish National Health System between 1998 and 2014. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A total of 507 hospitalizations with diagnosis of strongyloidiasis were recorded, 324 cases (63.9%) were males. The mean (±SD) age was 42.1±20.1 years. The impact of strongyloidiasis on the total population of Spain was 0.06 cases per 105 person-years, and the infection burden increased progressively over time (from 0.01 cases per 105 person-years in 1999 to 0.10 cases per 105 person-years in 2014). 40 cases (7.9%) died. The total cost was approximately €8,681,062.3, and the mean cost per patient was €17,122.4±97,968.8. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggest that strongyloidiasis is frequent in Spain and is increasing in incidence. Therefore, it would be desirable to improve the oversight and surveillance of this condition. Due to the fact that strongyloidiasis can be fatal, we believe that there is a need to establish risk categories for inclusion in national guidelines/protocols for screening individuals at risk of developing strongyloidiasis.
Publication type:HISTORICAL ARTICLE; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T


  3 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28464844
Author:Nabeya D; Haranaga S; Parrott GL; Kinjo T; Nahar S; Tanaka T; Hirata T; Hokama A; Tateyama M; Fujita J
Address:Department of Infectious Diseases, Respiratory, and Digestive Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, University of the Ryukyus, 207 Uehara, Nishihara, Okinawa, 903-0215, Japan. respiratoryyy@gmail.com.
Title:Pulmonary strongyloidiasis: assessment between manifestation and radiological findings in 16 severe strongyloidiasis cases.
Source:BMC Infect Dis; 17(1):320, 2017 05 02.
ISSN:1471-2334
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: Strongyloidiasis is a chronic parasitic infection caused by Strongyloides stercoralis. Severe cases such as, hyperinfection syndrome (HS) and disseminated strongyloidiasis (DS), can involve pulmonary manifestations. These manifestations frequently aid the diagnosis of strongyloidiasis. Here, we present the pulmonary manifestations and radiological findings of severe strongyloidiasis. METHODS: From January 2004 to December 2014, all patients diagnosed with severe strongyloidiasis at the University of the Ryukyus Hospital or affiliated hospitals in Okinawa, Japan, were included in this retrospective study. All diagnoses were confirmed by the microscopic or histopathological identification of larvae. Severe strongyloidiasis was defined by the presence of any of the following: 1) the identification of S. stercoralis from extra gastrointestinal specimens, 2) sepsis, 3) meningitis, 4) acute respiratory failure, or 5) respiratory tract hemorrhage. Patients were assigned to either HS or DS. Medical records were further reviewed to extract related clinical features and radiological findings. RESULTS: Sixteen severe strongyloidiasis cases were included. Of those, fifteen cases had pulmonary manifestations, eight had acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) (53%), seven had enteric bacterial pneumonia (46%) and five had pulmonary hemorrhage (33%). Acute respiratory failure was a common indicator for pulmonary manifestation (87%). Chest X-ray findings frequently showed diffuse shadows (71%). Additionally, ileum gas was detected for ten of the sixteen cases in the upper abdomen during assessment with chest X-ray. While, chest CT findings frequently showed ground-glass opacity (GGO) in 89% of patients. Interlobular septal thickening was also frequently shown (67%), always accompanying GGO in upper lobes. CONCLUSIONS: In summary, our study described HS/DS cases with pulmonary manifestations including, ARDS, bacterial pneumonia and pulmonary hemorrhage. Chest X-ray findings in HS/DS cases frequently showed diffuse shadows, and the combination of GGO and interlobular septal thickening in chest CT was common in HS/DS, regardless of accompanying pulmonary manifestations. This CT finding suggests alveolar hemorrhage could be used as a potential marker indicating the transition from latent to symptomatic state. Respiratory specimens are especially useful for detecting larvae in cases of HS/DS.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


  4 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27771420
Author:de Jesus Inês E; Sampaio Silva ML; de Souza JN; Galvão AA; Aquino Teixeira MC; Soares NM
Address:Departamento de Análises Clínicas e Toxicológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade Federal da Bahia, Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. Electronic address: farmliza@yahoo.com.br.
Title:Alterations in serum paraoxonase-1 activity and lipid profile in chronic alcoholic patients infected with Strongyloides stercoralis.
Source:Acta Trop; 166:1-6, 2017 Feb.
ISSN:1873-6254
Country of publication:Netherlands
Language:eng
Abstract:The objective of this study was to investigate paraoxonase-1 (PON1) activity, cortisol levels, and the lipid profile in the sera of alcoholic and non-alcoholic Strongyloides stercoralis-infected and uninfected individuals in a sample of 276 individuals attended at the National Health System in Salvador, Bahia, Brazil. The activity of PON1 was measured by the Beltowski method, serum lipids, and cortisol levels using commercial kits. PON1 activity was low in both alcoholic and non-alcoholic individuals infected with S. stercoralis. A positive correlation was observed between PON1 activity and cortisol concentration in alcoholic individuals who were not infected with S. stercoralis; whereas a negative correlation occurred in S. stercoralis-infected nonalcoholic individuals. The levels of triglycerides, LDL-C, and VLDL-C in S. stercoralis-infected alcoholic individuals were significantly lower than in uninfected alcoholic individuals. The high level of HDL-C and the low level of LDL-C, VLDL, triglycerides and PON1 activity in alcoholic patients infected with S. stercoralis evidenced an anti-atherogenic pattern.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:97C5T2UQ7J (Cholesterol); EC 3.1.8.1 (Aryldialkylphosphatase); EC 3.1.8.1 (PON1 protein, human); WI4X0X7BPJ (Hydrocortisone)


  5 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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PMID:29059195
Author:Forrer A; Khieu V; Schär F; Hattendorf J; Marti H; Neumayr A; Char MC; Hatz C; Muth S; Odermatt P
Address:Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Basel, Switzerland.
Title:Strongyloides stercoralis is associated with significant morbidity in rural Cambodia, including stunting in children.
Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis; 11(10):e0005685, 2017 Oct.
ISSN:1935-2735
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted nematode that can replicate within its host, leading to long-lasting and potentially fatal infections. It is ubiquitous and highly prevalent in Cambodia. The extent of morbidity associated with S. stercoralis infection is difficult to assess due to the broad spectrum of symptoms and, thus, remains uncertain. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Clinical signs were compared among S. stercoralis infected vs. non-infected participants in a cross-sectional survey conducted in 2012 in eight villages of Northern Cambodia, and before and after treatment with a single oral dose of ivermectin (200µg/kg BW) among participants harboring S. stercoralis. Growth retardation among schoolchildren and adolescents was assessed using height-for-age and thinness using body mass index-for-age. S. stercoralis prevalence was 31.1% among 2,744 participants. Urticaria (55% vs. 47%, OR: 1.4, 95% CI: 1.1-1.6) and itching (52% vs. 48%, OR: 1.2, 95% CI: 1.0-1.4) were more frequently reported by infected participants. Gastrointestinal, dermatological, and respiratory symptoms were less prevalent in 103 mono-infected participants after treatment. Urticaria (66% vs. 11%, OR: 0.03, 95% CI: 0.01-0.1) and abdominal pain (81 vs. 27%, OR: 0.07, 95% CI: 0.02-0.2) mostly resolved by treatment. S. stercoralis infection was associated with stunting, with 2.5-fold higher odds in case of heavy infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The morbidity associated with S. stercoralis confirmed the importance of gastrointestinal and dermatological symptoms unrelated to parasite load, and long-term chronic effects when associated with malnutrition. The combination of high prevalence and morbidity calls for the integration of S. stercoralis into ongoing STH control measures in Cambodia.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Antinematodal Agents); 70288-86-7 (Ivermectin)


  6 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28991899
Author:Echazú A; Juarez M; Vargas PA; Cajal SP; Cimino RO; Heredia V; Caropresi S; Paredes G; Arias LM; Abril M; Gold S; Lammie P; Krolewiecki AJ
Address:Instituto de Investigaciones en Enfermedades Tropicales, Universidad Nacional de Salta-Sede Regional Orán, San Ramón de la Nueva Orán, Salta, Argentina.
Title:Albendazole and ivermectin for the control of soil-transmitted helminths in an area with high prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis and hookworm in northwestern Argentina: A community-based pragmatic study.
Source:PLoS Negl Trop Dis; 11(10):e0006003, 2017 Oct.
ISSN:1935-2735
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: Recommendations for soil-transmitted helminth (STH) control give a key role to deworming of school and pre-school age children with albendazole or mebendazole; which might be insufficient to achieve adequate control, particularly against Strongyloides stercoralis. The impact of preventive chemotherapy (PC) against STH morbidity is still incompletely understood. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a community-based program with albendazole and ivermectin in a high transmission setting for S. stercoralis and hookworm. METHODOLOGY: Community-based pragmatic trial conducted in Tartagal, Argentina; from 2012 to 2015. Six communities (5070 people) were enrolled for community-based PC with albendazole and ivermectin. Two communities (2721 people) were re-treated for second and third rounds. STH prevalence, anemia and malnutrition were explored through consecutive surveys. Anthropometric assessment of children, stool analysis, complete blood count and NIE-ELISA serology for S. stercoralis were performed. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: STH infection was associated with anemia and stunting in the baseline survey that included all communities and showed a STH prevalence of 47.6% (almost exclusively hookworm and S. stercoralis). Among communities with multiple interventions, STH prevalence decreased from 62% to 23% (p<0.001) after the first PC; anemia also diminished from 52% to 12% (p<0.001). After two interventions S. stercoralis seroprevalence declined, from 51% to 14% (p<0.001) and stunting prevalence decreased, from 19% to 12% (p = 0.009). CONCLUSIONS: Hookworm' infections are associated with anemia in the general population and nutritional impairment in children. S. stercoralis is also associated with anemia. Community-based deworming with albendazole and ivermectin is effective for the reduction of STH prevalence and morbidity in communities with high prevalence of hookworm and S. stercoralis.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Anthelmintics); 0 (Soil); 70288-86-7 (Ivermectin); F4216019LN (Albendazole)


  7 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28929562
Author:Spinicci M; Macchioni F; Mantella A; Gabrielli S; Roselli M; Rojo Mayaregua D; Monasterio Pinckert J; Gamboa Barahona H; Paredes GA; Halkyer P; Cancrini G; Olliaro P; Montresor A; Bartoloni A
Address:Dipartimento di Medicina Sperimentale e Clinica, Università degli Studi di Firenze, Firenze, Italy.
Title:Seroepidemiological trend of strongyloidiasis in the Bolivian Chaco (1987-2013) in the absence of disease-specific control measures.
Source:Trop Med Int Health; 22(11):1457-1462, 2017 Nov.
ISSN:1365-3156
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:OBJECTIVES: The prevalence of Strongyloides stercoralis infections is grossly underestimated because infections go mostly undetected, although they can persist for a lifetime due to the auto-infective cycle. In the Bolivian Chaco, the prevalence of soil-transmitted nematodes dropped dramatically in the past 25 years, but the mebendazole used for preventive chemotherapy has no effect on S. stercoralis. Meanwhile, the prevalence of intestinal protozoan infections remains unchanged. We compared S. stercoralis seroprevalence in rural communities of the Bolivian Chaco from 1987 to 2013. METHODS: Sera collected during two previous serosurveys, conducted in the Chaco region in 1987 and 2013, were tested for S. stercoralis using a commercial assay (Bordier-ELISA, Bordier Affinity Products, Switzerland). RESULTS: Overall, 355 sera were analysed, 122 from the 1987 survey and 233 from the 2013 survey. Seropositivity for S. stercoralis was significantly more prevalent in 1987 (19/122, 16% in 1987 vs. 15/233, 6% in 2013, P = 0.006), accounted for by a drop from 17% to 3% in people under 26 years of age. Multivariate analysis showed a significant association between seropositivity for S. stercoralis and age in the 2013 population (OR 1.03 for each one-year increase, 95%CI 1.00-1.05, P = 0.04), but none in 1987. CONCLUSIONS: The significant reduction in S. stercoralis seroprevalence in Bolivian Chaco cannot be explained by preventive chemotherapy or improved social-sanitary conditions. As the drop is seen in younger generations, it is consistent with little transmission occurring. However, the risk of transmission still exists, as prevalence is persistently high in older individuals, who present a potential reservoir due to the lifelong nature of S. stercoralis infections.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Soil)


  8 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28874444
Author:Anuradha R; Munisankar S; Bhootra Y; Dolla C; Kumaran P; Nutman TB; Babu S
Address:National Institutes of Health-NIRT-International Center for Excellence in Research, Chennai, India.
Title:Modulation of CD4 and CD8 T Cell Function and Cytokine Responses in Strongyloides stercoralis Infection by Interleukin-27 (IL-27) and IL-37.
Source:Infect Immun; 85(11), 2017 Nov.
ISSN:1098-5522
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:infection is associated with diminished antigen-specific Th1- and Th17-associated responses and enhanced Th2-associated responses. Interleukin-27 (IL-27) and IL-37 are two known anti-inflammatory cytokines that are highly expressed in infection. We therefore wanted to examine the role of IL-27 and IL-37 in regulating CD4 and CD8 T cell responses in infection. To this end, we examined the frequency of Th1/Tc1, Th2/Tc2, Th9/Tc9, Th17/Tc17, and Th22/Tc22 cells in 15 -infected individuals and 10 uninfected individuals stimulated with parasite antigen following IL-27 or IL-37 neutralization. We also examined the production of prototypical type 1, type 2, type 9, type 17, and type 22 cytokines in the whole-blood supernatants. Our data reveal that IL-27 or IL-37 neutralization resulted in significantly enhanced frequencies of Th1/Tc1, Th2/Tc2, Th17/Tc17, Th9, and Th22 cells with parasite antigen stimulation. There was no induction of any T cell response in uninfected individuals following parasite antigen stimulation and IL-27 or IL-37 neutralization. Moreover, we also observed increased production of gamma interferon (IFN-γ), IL-5, IL-9, IL-17, and IL-22 and decreased production of IL-10 following IL-27 and IL-37 neutralization and parasite antigen stimulation in whole-blood cultures. Thus, we demonstrate that IL-27 and IL-37 limit the induction of particular T cell subsets along with cytokine responses in infections, which suggest the importance of IL-27 and IL-37 in immune modulation in a chronic helminth infection.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Antibodies, Neutralizing); 0 (Antigens, Helminth); 0 (IL27 protein, human); 0 (IL37 protein, human); 0 (IL4 protein, human); 0 (IL5 protein, human); 0 (IL9 protein, human); 0 (Interleukin-1); 0 (Interleukin-13); 0 (Interleukin-17); 0 (Interleukin-5); 0 (Interleukin-9); 0 (Interleukins); 0 (interleukin-22); 207137-56-2 (Interleukin-4); 82115-62-6 (Interferon-gamma)


  9 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28869694
Author:Salvador F; Sulleiro E; Piron M; Sánchez-Montalvá A; Sauleda S; Molina-Morant D; Moure Z; Molina I
Address:Department of Infectious Diseases, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, PROSICS Barcelona, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain.
Title:Strongyloides stercoralis infection increases the likelihood to detect Trypanosoma cruzi DNA in peripheral blood in Chagas disease patients.
Source:Trop Med Int Health; 22(11):1436-1441, 2017 Nov.
ISSN:1365-3156
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:OBJECTIVES: In a previous study performed by our group, Strongyloides stercoralis infection in patients with Chagas disease was associated with higher proportion of Trypanosoma cruzi DNA detection in peripheral blood. The aim of the study was to confirm this association in a larger cohort of patients. METHODS: Cross-sectional study of all patients with Chagas disease diagnosed from 2005 to 2015 during blood donation at the Catalan Blood Bank. Demographic data and T. cruzi RT-PCR were collected. S. stercoralis infection diagnosis was based on a serological test. RESULTS: Two hundred and two blood donors were included. T. cruzi RT-PCR was positive in 72 (35.6%) patients, and S. stercoralis serology was positive in 22 (10.9%) patients. Patients with positive S. stercoralis serology had higher proportion of positive T. cruzi RT-PCR than those with negative serology (54.5% vs. 33.3%, P = 0.050), and the difference increased when taking a serological index cut-off of 2.5, which increases the specificity of the test to detect a confirmed strongyloidiasis (60% vs. 33%, P = 0.017). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with Chagas disease with positive S. stercoralis serology had higher proportion of positive T. cruzi RT-PCR in peripheral blood than those with negative serology, which reflects the potential immunomodulatory effects of S. stercoralis in T. cruzi co-infected patients.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:9007-49-2 (DNA)


  10 / 3114 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28820707
Author:de Alegría MLAR; Colmenares K; Espasa M; Amor A; Lopez I; Nindia A; Kanjala J; Guilherme D; Sulleiro E; Barriga B; Gil E; Salvador F; Bocanegra C; López T; Moreno M; Molina I
Address:Department of Infectious Diseases, Vall d'Hebron University Hospital, PROSICS, Barcelona, Spain.
Title:Prevalence of and Other Intestinal Parasite Infections in School Children in a Rural Area of Angola: A Cross-Sectional Study.
Source:Am J Trop Med Hyg; 97(4):1226-1231, 2017 Oct.
ISSN:1476-1645
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:is widely distributed in the tropics and subtropics. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of and other intestinal parasites and identify the risk factors for infection with in a rural area of Angola. A cross-sectional study was conducted in school-age children (SAC) in Cubal, Angola. A questionnaire collecting clinical and epidemiological variables was used, and two stool samples were collected. A concentration technique (Ritchie) and a technique for detection of larvae migration (Baermann) were performed. Of 230 SAC, 56.1% were female and the mean age was 9.3 years (SD 2.45). Severe malnutrition, according to body mass index (BMI)-for-age, was observed in 20.4% of the SAC, and anemia was found in 59.6%. was observed in 28 of the 230 (12.8%) SAC. Eggs of other helminths were observed in 51 (22.2%) students: spp. in 27 students (11.7%), hookworm in 14 (6.1%), four (1.7%), in four (1.7%), in three (1.3%), spp. in two (0.9%), and one (0.4%). Protozoa were observed in 17 (7.4%) students. Detection of was higher using the Baermann technique versus using formol-ether (11.3 vs. 3%). Overall prevalence of in the school population of 16 studied schools in the municipal area of Cubal was greater than 10%. This fact must be considered when designing deworming mass campaigns. The use of specific tests in larvae detection is needed to avoid overlooking this parasite.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE



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