Database : MEDLINE
Search on : D02.241.223.100.050.500.640 [DeCS Category]
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  1 / 1792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:29283262
Author:Laborda P; Zhao Y; Ling J; Hou R; Liu F
Address:Institute of Plant Protection, Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences , Nanjing 210014, China.
Title:Production of Antifungal p-Aminobenzoic Acid in Lysobacter antibioticus OH13.
Source:J Agric Food Chem; 66(3):630-636, 2018 Jan 24.
ISSN:1520-5118
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:Among Lysobacter species, Lysobacter antibioticus has been demonstrated to be an interesting source of antimicrobial metabolites for the biocontrol of plant diseases. Although the antibacterial activity was attributed to N-oxide phenazines, the active compounds involved in the antifungal function remained unknown. In this work, an antifungal compound was isolated and identified as p-aminobenzoic acid (pABA). Antifungal activity screening revealed that pABA shows activity against a number of plant pathogens. The genes involved in the synthetic route of this compound in OH13 were identified. Further, the production of pABA was optimized by modification of the carbon source using engineered L. antibioticus OH13 strains.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Fungicides, Industrial); TL2TJE8QTX (4-Aminobenzoic Acid)


  2 / 1792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28747479
Author:Wale N; Sim DG; Read AF
Address:Center for Infectious Disease Dynamics and Department of Biology, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802, USA nwale@umich.edu.
Title:A nutrient mediates intraspecific competition between rodent malaria parasites .
Source:Proc Biol Sci; 284(1859), 2017 Jul 26.
ISSN:1471-2954
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:Hosts are often infected with multiple strains of a single parasite species. Within-host competition between parasite strains can be intense and has implications for the evolution of traits that impact patient health, such as drug resistance and virulence. Yet the mechanistic basis of within-host competition is poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that a parasite nutrient, para-aminobenzoic acid (pABA), mediates competition between a drug resistant and drug susceptible strain of the malaria parasite, We further show that increasing pABA supply to hosts infected with the resistant strain worsens disease and changes the relationship between parasite burden and pathology. Our experiments demonstrate that, even when there is profound top-down regulation (immunity), bottom-up regulation of pathogen populations can occur and that its importance may vary during an infection. The identification of resources that can be experimentally controlled opens up the opportunity to manipulate competitive interactions between parasites and hence their evolution.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:TL2TJE8QTX (4-Aminobenzoic Acid)


  3 / 1792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28137428
Author:Silva AFT; Sarraguça MC; Ribeiro PR; Santos AO; De Beer T; Lopes JA
Address:LAQV/REQUIMTE, Departamento de Ciências Químicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua Jorge Viterbo Ferreira, 228, 4050-313 Porto, Portugal; Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Process Analytical Technology, Ghent University, Ottergemsesteenweg 460, 9000 Ghent, Belgium.
Title:Statistical process control of cocrystallization processes: A comparison between OPLS and PLS.
Source:Int J Pharm; 520(1-2):29-38, 2017 Mar 30.
ISSN:1873-3476
Country of publication:Netherlands
Language:eng
Abstract:Orthogonal partial least squares regression (OPLS) is being increasingly adopted as an alternative to partial least squares (PLS) regression due to the better generalization that can be achieved. Particularly in multivariate batch statistical process control (BSPC), the use of OPLS for estimating nominal trajectories is advantageous. In OPLS, the nominal process trajectories are expected to be captured in a single predictive principal component while uncorrelated variations are filtered out to orthogonal principal components. In theory, OPLS will yield a better estimation of the Hotelling's T statistic and corresponding control limits thus lowering the number of false positives and false negatives when assessing the process disturbances. Although OPLS advantages have been demonstrated in the context of regression, its use on BSPC was seldom reported. This study proposes an OPLS-based approach for BSPC of a cocrystallization process between hydrochlorothiazide and p-aminobenzoic acid monitored on-line with near infrared spectroscopy and compares the fault detection performance with the same approach based on PLS. A series of cocrystallization batches with imposed disturbances were used to test the ability to detect abnormal situations by OPLS and PLS-based BSPC methods. Results demonstrated that OPLS was generally superior in terms of sensibility and specificity in most situations. In some abnormal batches, it was found that the imposed disturbances were only detected with OPLS.
Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0J48LPH2TH (Hydrochlorothiazide); TL2TJE8QTX (4-Aminobenzoic Acid)


  4 / 1792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27734316
Author:Zhai P; Chen X; Dong W; Li H; Chovelon JM
Address:Shanghai Key Laboratory of Atmospheric Particle Pollution and Prevention, Department of Environmental Science and Engineering, Fudan University, 220 Handan Road, Shanghai, 200433, China.
Title:Degradation of triclosan in the presence of p-aminobenzoic acid under simulated sunlight irradiation.
Source:Environ Sci Pollut Res Int; 24(1):558-567, 2017 Jan.
ISSN:1614-7499
Country of publication:Germany
Language:eng
Abstract:This study aimed to investigate the degradation of triclosan (TCS) in the presence of p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) under simulated sunlight irradiation (λ ≥ 290 nm). The effect of PABA concentration, pH, dissolved organic matter (DOM), and DOM-hydrolytic Fe(III) species complexes on the photodegradation of TCS in the presence of PABA (TCS ) was also studied. The photolysis of TCS obeyed pseudo-first-order kinetics well, and the degradation of TCS enhanced with increasing solution pH (from 3.0 to 11.0). The presence of PABA inhibited the degradation of TCS , and the weakest inhibitory effect was observed while the concentration of PABA was 5 mg L . The addition of DOM (Suwannee River fulvic acid standard I [SRFA], Suwannee River HA standard II [SRHA], and Suwannee River natural organic matter [SRNOM]) showed different inhibition effects on TCS degradation. However, higher Fe(III) concentration at the DOM concentration of 5 mg L could favor the formation of DOM-hydrolytic Fe(III) species complexes, further accelerating the degradation of TCS . In comparison with deionized water (DI water), TCS could be better photodegraded in river water nearby the effluent of a wastewater treatment plant. This study provides useful information for understanding the natural behavior of TCS in the presence of other organic contaminants.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Benzopyrans); 0 (Humic Substances); 0 (Waste Water); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical); 4NM5039Y5X (Triclosan); E1UOL152H7 (Iron); TL2TJE8QTX (4-Aminobenzoic Acid); XII14C5FXV (fulvic acid)


  5 / 1792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27635025
Author:Ordonez AA; Weinstein EA; Bambarger LE; Saini V; Chang YS; DeMarco VP; Klunk MH; Urbanowski ME; Moulton KL; Murawski AM; Pokkali S; Kalinda AS; Jain SK
Address:Center for Infection and Inflammation Imaging Research, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland.
Title:A Systematic Approach for Developing Bacteria-Specific Imaging Tracers.
Source:J Nucl Med; 58(1):144-150, 2017 Jan.
ISSN:1535-5667
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:The modern patient is increasingly susceptible to bacterial infections including those due to multidrug-resistant organisms (MDROs). Noninvasive whole-body analysis with pathogen-specific imaging technologies can significantly improve patient outcomes by rapidly identifying a source of infection and monitoring the response to treatment, but no such technology exists clinically. METHODS: We systematically screened 961 random radiolabeled molecules in silico as substrates for essential metabolic pathways in bacteria, followed by in vitro uptake in representative bacteria-Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and mycobacteria. Fluorine-labeled analogs, that could be developed as PET-based imaging tracers, were evaluated in a murine myositis model. RESULTS: We identified 3 novel, nontoxic molecules demonstrating selective bacterial uptake: para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), with uptake in all representative bacteria including Mycobacterium tuberculosis; mannitol, with selective uptake in S. aureus and E. coli; and sorbitol, accumulating only in E. coli None accumulated in mammalian cells or heat-killed bacteria, suggesting metabolism-derived specificity. In addition to an extended bacterial panel of laboratory strains, all 3 molecules rapidly accumulated in respective clinical isolates of interest including MDROs such as methicillin-resistant S. aureus, extended-spectrum ß-lactamase-producing, and carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae. In a murine myositis model, fluorine-labeled analogs of all 3 molecules could rapidly detect and differentiate infection sites from sterile inflammation in mice (P = 0.03). Finally, 2-deoxy-2-[F-18]fluoro-d-sorbitol ( F-FDS) can be easily synthesized from F-FDG. PET, with F-FDS synthesized using current good manufacturing practice, could rapidly differentiate true infection from sterile inflammation to selectively localize E. coli infection in mice. CONCLUSION: We have developed a systematic approach that exploits unique biochemical pathways in bacteria to develop novel pathogen-specific imaging tracers. These tracers have significant potential for clinical translation to specifically detect and localize a broad range of bacteria, including MDROs.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Radiopharmaceuticals); 3OWL53L36A (Mannitol); 506T60A25R (Sorbitol); TL2TJE8QTX (4-Aminobenzoic Acid)


  6 / 1792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27535155
Author:Tsoumachidou S; Lambropoulou D; Poulios I
Address:Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, Department of Chemistry, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124, Thessaloniki, Greece.
Title:Homogeneous photocatalytic oxidation of UV filter para-aminobenzoic acid in aqueous solutions.
Source:Environ Sci Pollut Res Int; 24(2):1113-1121, 2017 Jan.
ISSN:1614-7499
Country of publication:Germany
Language:eng
Abstract:The presence of personal care product (PCP) residues in the aquatic environment is an emerging issue due to their uncontrolled release through graywater; for this reason, efforts are being made to develop methods to inactivate or eliminate this class of substances in the environment. In this work, homogeneous photocatalysis has been applied for the degradation of UV filter para-aminobenzoic acid (PABA), which exists in several types of PCPs, in order to identify the optimum degradation conditions. The oxidation of PABA by photo-Fenton and oxalate-induced photo-Fenton (ferrioxalate) processes was investigated, and the effect of various operating variables has been assessed, i.e., Fe (0.0035-0.014 g L ), H O (0.025-0.2 g L ), T (280-323 K), and type of radiation (UV-A, visible). Furthermore, experiments under optimal conditions have been performed in order to evaluate the transformation pathways and phytotoxicity of the treated PABA solution.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Cosmetics); 0 (Oxalates); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical); 15321-61-6 (ferrioxalate); TL2TJE8QTX (4-Aminobenzoic Acid)


  7 / 1792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27723351
Author:Singaraju AB; Nguyen K; Jain A; Haware RV; Stevens LL
Address:Division of Pharmaceutics and Translational Therapeutics, College of Pharmacy, The University of Iowa , Iowa City, Iowa 52242, United States.
Title:Aggregate Elasticity, Crystal Structure, and Tableting Performance for p-Aminobenzoic Acid and a Series of Its Benzoate Esters.
Source:Mol Pharm; 13(11):3794-3806, 2016 Nov 07.
ISSN:1543-8392
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:The tableting performance for p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) and a series of its benzoate esters with increasing alkyl chain length (methyl-, ethyl-, and n-butyl) was determined over a broad range of compaction pressures. The crystalline structure of methyl benzoate (Me-PABA) exhibits no slip systems and does not form viable compacts under any compaction pressure. The ethyl (Et-PABA) and n-butyl (Bu-PABA) esters each have a similar, corrugated-layer structure that displays a prominent slip plane and improves material plasticity at low compaction pressure. The compact tensile strength for Et-PABA is superior to that for Bu-PABA; however, neither material achieved a tensile strength greater than 2 MPa over the compression range studied. Complementary studies with powder Brillouin light scattering (BLS) show the maxima of the shear wave, acoustic frequency distribution red shift in an order consistent with both the observed tabletability and attachment energy calculations. Moreover, zero-porosity aggregate elastic moduli are determined for each material using the average acoustic frequency obtained from specific characteristics of the powder BLS spectra. The Young's moduli for Et- and Bu-PABA is significantly reduced relative to PABA and Me-PABA, and this reduction is further evident in tablet compressibility plots. PABA, however, is distinct with high elastic isotropy as interpreted from the narrow and well-defined powder BLS frequency distributions for both the shear and compressional acoustic modes. The acoustic isotropy is consistent with the quasi-isotropic distribution of hydrogen bonding for PABA. At low compaction pressure, PABA tablets display the lowest tensile strength of the series; however, above a compaction pressure of ca. 70 MPa PABA tablet tensile strength continues to increase while that for Et- and Bu-PABA plateaus. PABA displays lower plasticity relative to either ester, and this is consistent with its crystalline structure and high yield pressure determined from in-die Heckel analysis. Overall the complementary approach of using both structural and the acoustic inputs uniquely provided from powder BLS is anticipated to expand our comprehension of the structure-mechanics relationship and its role in tableting performance.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Benzoates); 0 (Esters); 6618K1VJ9T (methyl benzoate); TL2TJE8QTX (4-Aminobenzoic Acid)


  8 / 1792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27597056
Author:Grigorieva DV; Gorudko IV; Sokolov AV; Kostevich VA; Vasilyev VB; Cherenkevich SN; Panasenko OM
Address:Physics Faculty, Belarusian State University, Minsk, Belarus.
Title:Myeloperoxidase Stimulates Neutrophil Degranulation.
Source:Bull Exp Biol Med; 161(4):495-500, 2016 Aug.
ISSN:1573-8221
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:Myeloperoxidase, heme enzyme of azurophilic granules in neutrophils, is released into the extracellular space in the inflammation foci. In neutrophils, it stimulates a dose-dependent release of lactoferrin (a protein of specific granules), lysozyme (a protein of specific and azurophilic granules), and elastase (a protein of azurophilic granules). 4-Aminobenzoic acid hydrazide, a potent inhibitor of peroxidase activity of myeloperoxidase, produced no effect on neutrophil degranulation. Using signal transduction inhibitors (genistein, methoxyverapamil, wortmannin, and NiCl2), we demonstrated that myeloperoxidase-induced degranulation of neutrophils resulted from enzyme interaction with the plasma membrane and depends on activation of tyrosine kinases, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinases (PI3K), and calcium signaling. Myeloperoxidase modified by oxidative/halogenation stress (chlorinated and monomeric forms of the enzyme) lost the potency to activate neutrophil degranulation.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Androstadienes); 39WPC8JHR8 (Gallopamil); 696BNE976J (nickel chloride); 7OV03QG267 (Nickel); DH2M523P0H (Genistein); EC 1.11.1.7 (Peroxidase); EC 2.7.1.- (Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases); TL2TJE8QTX (4-Aminobenzoic Acid); XVA4O219QW (wortmannin)


  9 / 1792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27550713
Author:Kim H; Wei Y; Lee JY; Wu Y; Zheng Y; Moskowitz MA; Chen JW
Address:Center for Systems Biology and Institute for Innovation in Imaging (H.K., J.Y.L., J.W.C), and Neuroscience Center (Y. Wei, Y. Wu, Y.Z., M.A.M.), Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.
Title:Myeloperoxidase Inhibition Increases Neurogenesis after Ischemic Stroke.
Source:J Pharmacol Exp Ther; 359(2):262-272, 2016 Nov.
ISSN:1521-0103
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:The relationship between inflammation and neurogenesis in stroke is currently not well understood. Focal ischemia enhances cell proliferation and neurogenesis in the neurogenic regions, including the subventricular zone (SVZ), dentate gyrus, as well as the non-neurogenic striatum, and cortex in the ischemic hemisphere. Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is a potent oxidizing enzyme secreted during inflammation by activated leukocytes, and its enzymatic activity is highly elevated after stroke. In this study, we investigated whether the inhibition of MPO activity by a specific irreversible inhibitor, 4-aminobenzoic acid hydrazide (ABAH) (MPO mice) can increase neurogenesis after transient middle cerebral artery occlusion in mice. ABAH administration increased the number of proliferating bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-positive cells expressing markers for neural stems cells, astrocytes, neuroprogenitor cells (Nestin), and neuroblasts (doublecortin) in the ischemic SVZ, anterior SVZ, striatum, and cortex. MPO inhibition also increased levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein (Ser133), acetylated H3, and NeuN to promote neurogenesis in the ischemic SVZ. ABAH treatment also increased chemokine CXC receptor 4 expression in the ischemic SVZ. MPO-deficient mice treated with vehicle or ABAH both showed similar effects on the number of BrdU cells in the ischemic hemisphere, demonstrating that ABAH is specific to MPO. Taken together, our results underscore a detrimental role of MPO activity to postischemia neurogenesis and that a strategy to inhibit MPO activity can increase cell proliferation and improve neurogenesis after ischemic stroke.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor); 0 (CXCR4 protein, mouse); 0 (Cyclic AMP Response Element-Binding Protein); 0 (Enzyme Inhibitors); 0 (Histones); 0 (Nerve Tissue Proteins); 0 (NeuN protein, mouse); 0 (Nuclear Proteins); 0 (Receptors, CXCR4); EC 1.11.1.7 (Peroxidase); EC 3.4.24.35 (Matrix Metalloproteinase 9); TL2TJE8QTX (4-Aminobenzoic Acid)


  10 / 1792 MEDLINE  
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PMID:27529387
Author:Zhang S; Chen J; Zhao Q; Xie Q; Wei X
Address:Key Laboratory of Pollution Ecology and Environmental Engineering, Institute of Applied Ecology, Chinese Academy of Science, Shenyang 110016, China.
Title:Unveiling self-sensitized photodegradation pathways by DFT calculations: A case of sunscreen p-aminobenzoic acid.
Source:Chemosphere; 163:227-233, 2016 Nov.
ISSN:1879-1298
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:Self-sensitized photodegradation has been observed for diverse aquatic organic pollutants. However, photodegradation pathways have not been clarified in previous experimental studies. Here, we attempted to probe self-sensitized photodegradation pathways of organic pollutants employing both photolytic experiments and density functional theory calculations. By performing photolytic experiments, we found that singlet state oxygen ((1)O2) play an essential role in photodegradation of a sunscreen p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA). PABA can photogenerate (1)O2 and react fast with (1)O2. We hypothesized that PABA underwent (1)O2 induced self-sensitized photodegradation. By calculating transition states, intermediates and reaction barriers, we found that (1)O2 can oxidize PABA through electrophilic attacks on the benzene ring to abstract one H atom of the amino group following a 1,3-addition mechanism or to induce decarboxylation. Either pathway produces a hydroperoxide. O-O bond cleavage of the hydroperoxides occurring at ground states or the lowest triplet excited states can produce phenoxyl radical precursors of 4-amino-3-hydroxybenzoic acid and 4-aminophenol, which are photodegradation products detected in experiments. Thus, a viable (1)O2 self-sensitized photodegradation mechanism was unveiled for PABA.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (4-amino-3-hydroxybenzoic acid); 0 (Hydroxybenzoates); 0 (Sunscreening Agents); 0 (Water Pollutants, Chemical); 0 (para-Aminobenzoates); 17778-80-2 (Singlet Oxygen); TL2TJE8QTX (4-Aminobenzoic Acid)



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