Database : MEDLINE
Search on : D02.241.223.100.050.500.647 [DeCS Category]
References found : 4684 [refine]
Displaying: 1 .. 10   in format [Large]

page 1 of 469 go to page                         

  1 / 4684 MEDLINE  
              next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
Texto completo
PMID:28671265
Author:Vayne-Bossert P; Haywood A; Good P; Khan S; Rickett K; Hardy JR
Address:Department of Readaptation and Palliative Medicine, University Hospitals of Geneva, 11 chemin de la Savonnière, Collonge-Bellerive, Geneva, Switzerland, 1245.
Title:Corticosteroids for adult patients with advanced cancer who have nausea and vomiting (not related to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery).
Source:Cochrane Database Syst Rev; 7:CD012002, 2017 07 03.
ISSN:1469-493X
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: Nausea is a common symptom in advanced cancer, with a prevalence of up to 70%. While nausea and vomiting can be related to cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery, a significant number of people with advanced cancer also suffer from nausea unrelated to such therapies. Nausea and vomiting may also cause psychological distress, and have a negative impact on the quality of life of cancer patients; similarly to pain, nausea is often under-treated. The exact mechanism of action of corticosteroids on nausea is unclear, however, they are used to manage a number of cancer-specific complications, including spinal cord compression, raised intracranial pressure, and lymphangitis carcinomatosis. They are also commonly used in palliative care for a wide variety of non-specific indications, such as pain, nausea, anorexia, fatigue, and low mood. However, there is little objective evidence of their efficacy in symptom control, and corticosteroids have a wide range of adverse effects that are dose and time dependent. In view of their widespread use, it is important to seek evidence of their effects on nausea and vomiting not related to cancer treatment. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of corticosteroids on nausea and vomiting not related to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery in adult cancer patients. SEARCH METHODS: We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE Ovid, Embase Ovid, CINAHL EBSCO, Science Citation Index Web of Science, Latin America and Caribbean Health Sciences (LILACS), Conference Proceedings Citation Index - Science Web of Science, and clinical trial registries, from inception to 23rd August 2016. SELECTION CRITERIA: Any double-blind randomised or prospective controlled trial that included adults aged 18 years and over with advanced cancer with nausea and vomiting not related to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery were eligible for the review, when using corticosteroids as antiemetic treatment. DATA COLLECTION AND ANALYSIS: All review authors independently assessed trial quality and extracted data. We used arithmetic means and standard deviations for each outcome to report the mean difference (MD) with 95% confidence interval (CI). We assessed the quality of the evidence using GRADE and created a 'Summary of findings' table. MAIN RESULTS: Three studies met the inclusion criteria, enrolling 451 participants. The trial size varied from 51 to 280 participants. Two studies compared dexamethasone to placebo, and the third study compared a number of additional interventions in various combinations, including metoclopramide, chlorpromazine, tropisetron, and dexamethasone. The duration of the studies ranged from seven to 14 days. We included two studies (127 participants) with data at eight days in the meta-analysis for nausea intensity; no data were available that incorporated the same outcome measures for the third study. Corticosteroid therapy with dexamethasone resulted in less nausea (measured on a scale of 0 to 10, with a lower score indicating less nausea) compared to placebo at eight days (MD 0.48 lower nausea, 95% CI 1.53 lower to 0.57 higher; very low-quality evidence), although this result was not statistically significant (P = 0.37). Frequency of adverse events was not significantly different between groups, and the interventions were well tolerated. Factors limiting statistical analysis included the lack of standardised measurements of nausea, and the use of different agents, dosages, and comparisons. Subgroup analysis according to type of cancer was not possible due to insufficient data. The quality of this evidence was downgraded by three levels, from high to very low due to imprecision, likely selection bias, attrition bias, and the small number of participants in the included studies. AUTHORS' CONCLUSIONS: There are few studies assessing the effects of corticosteroids on nausea and vomiting not related to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or surgery in adult cancer patients. This review found very low-quality evidence which neither supported nor refuted corticosteroid use in this setting. Further high quality studies are needed to determine if corticosteroids are efficacious in this setting.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; META-ANALYSIS; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; REVIEW
Name of substance:0 (Adrenal Cortex Hormones); 0 (Indoles); 6I819NIK1W (tropisetron); 7S5I7G3JQL (Dexamethasone); L4YEB44I46 (Metoclopramide); U42B7VYA4P (Chlorpromazine)


  2 / 4684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PMID:28603124
Author:Khan A; Khan J; Irfan M; Naqvi SBS; Khan GM; Shoaib MH; Yousaf RI; Khan A
Address:Department of Pharmacy, Quid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, Pakistan.
Title:Validation and application of high performance liquid chromatographic method for the estimation of metoclopramide hydrochloride in plasma.
Source:Pak J Pharm Sci; 30(1):143-147, 2017 Jan.
ISSN:1011-601X
Country of publication:Pakistan
Language:eng
Abstract:The objective of this study was validation of a reverse phase HPLC method for the estimation of metoclopramide HCl in plasma already validated for determination of metoclopramide HCl in tablets dosage form. A reverse chromatographic method was used for estimation of metoclopramide HCl with the mobile phase of acetonitrile, 20mM potassium dihydrogen phosphate buffer solution (pH 3.0 adjusted with orthophosphoric acid) in the ratio of 40: 60. The column used was Waters C18 3.9×300mm µBondapak (RP). The flow rate of the mobile phase was 2ml/ minute. The detector was set at the wavelength of 275nm. This method validated in plasma and was found to be linear, with correlation coefficient (R ), value of 0.9988, in the range of 48 ng/ml-0.25ng/ml. The method modified was accurate, precise, sensitive and showed good stability results. The % RSD of the retention time and peak area of metoclopramide HCl was 0.19% and 1.44% respectively. All the parameters such as specificity, linearity, range, accuracy, precision, system suitability, solution stability, detection and quantification limits were evaluated to validate this method and were found within the acceptance limits. The method can be effectively used for estimation of metoclopramide HCl in plasma.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; VALIDATION STUDIES
Name of substance:0 (Dopamine D2 Receptor Antagonists); L4YEB44I46 (Metoclopramide)


  3 / 4684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
PMID:28577245
Author:Bielefeldt K
Address:George E. Wahlen VA Medical Center, Salt Lake City Specialty Care Center of Innovation and University of Utah, 500 Foothill Dr., Salt Lake City, UT, 84148, USA. Klaus.Bielefeldt@va.gov.
Title:From Harmful Treatment to Secondary Gain: Adverse Event Reporting in Dyspepsia and Gastroparesis.
Source:Dig Dis Sci; 62(11):2999-3013, 2017 Nov.
ISSN:1573-2568
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Medical management of gastroparesis and functional dyspepsia remains difficult with several recent trials showing limited or no benefit. If treatment comes with only marginal improvements, concerns about adverse events become more relevant. We therefore examined the type and outcomes of side effects submitted to a public repository. METHODS: We searched the Federal Adverse Event Reporting System for reports associated with the treatment of dyspepsia or gastroparesis. Demographic data, medications used and implicated, side effects, and outcomes were abstracted for the years 2004-2015. RESULTS: Acid-suppressive agents and prokinetics were the most commonly listed medications with a stronger emphasis on prokinetics in gastroparesis. Submissions related to metoclopramide by far exceeded reports about other agents and mostly described tardive dyskinesia or other neurological concerns. They peaked around 2012, driven by submissions through legal workers. Most reports about metoclopramide described short-term use to prevent or treat nausea and vomiting. Concerns about acid-suppressive medications increased over time and spanned a wide spectrum of potential problems, including osteoporosis, worsening renal function, or cardiac events. CONCLUSION: Despite biasing factors, such as pending legal action, the voluntary repository of adverse events provides insight into current medical practice and its associated risk. Knowing about common and uncommon, but potentially serious risks may enable patients and providers to decide on effective and safe management strategies.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Antiemetics); 0 (Dopamine D2 Receptor Antagonists); 0 (Gastrointestinal Agents); 0 (Proton Pump Inhibitors); L4YEB44I46 (Metoclopramide)


  4 / 4684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
PMID:28321081
Author:Harada T; Hirosawa T; Morinaga K; Shimizu T
Address:Division of General Medicine, Dokkyo Medical University Hospital, Japan.
Title:Metoclopramide-induced Serotonin Syndrome.
Source:Intern Med; 56(6):737-739, 2017.
ISSN:1349-7235
Country of publication:Japan
Language:eng
Abstract:A 40-year-old woman with bipolar disorder who was taking mirtazapine presented with mydriasis, abnormal diaphoresis, myoclonus and muscle rigidity after taking metocloplamide. Her medical history, which included the use of serotonergic agents, and the presence of symptoms including myoclonus and muscle rigidity were consistent with a diagnosis of serotonin syndrome (SS) according to the Hunter criteria. The symptoms diminished following three days of treatment with oral lorazepam and cyproheptadine and a reduced dose of mirtazapine. Metoclopramide is frequently used to various gastric symptom. Metoclopramide is not widely known to induce SS. This potentially fatal condition should be avoided by exercising care in the use of drugs that have the potential to cause drug-drug interactions.
Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Antiemetics); 0 (Serotonin Uptake Inhibitors); 250PJI13LM (Mianserin); A051Q2099Q (mirtazapine); L4YEB44I46 (Metoclopramide)


  5 / 4684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
PMID:28183560
Author:Duque M; Santos L; Ribeiro S; Catré D
Address:Anesthesiology Department, Centro Hospitalar Tondela-Viseu, Avenida Rei D. Duarte, 3504 509, Viseu, Portugal. Electronic address: melanieduque@gmail.com.
Title:Anesthesia and Brugada syndrome: a 12-year case series.
Source:J Clin Anesth; 36:168-173, 2017 Feb.
ISSN:1873-4529
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:STUDY OBJECTIVE: The aim of this 12-year case series was to review the drugs used during anesthetic management of patients with diagnosis of or risk criteria for Brugada syndrome (BrS), and to document any possible association between these drugs and arrhythmogenic activity or unexplained hemodynamic instability. DESIGN: A retrospective clinical observational study. SETTING: Tertiary hospital. PATIENTS: Thirty-one patients met our inclusion criteria: 20 belonging to group D (diagnosed BrS) and 11 to group R (risk of BrS). They underwent a total of 43 anesthetic interventions (28 in group D and 15 in group R). INTERVENTIONS: Records from patients with or at risk of BrS who underwent anesthetic intervention at our hospital between May 2003 and May 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. Drugs used were compared with those recommended to be avoided or preferably avoided, published by specialists in the field at brugadadrugs.org. MEASUREMENTS: Hemodynamic and cardiac complications during anesthesia were assessed for hypothetical association with these drugs. MAIN RESULTS: From the list of drugs available in medical literature recommended to avoid in BrS patients the following were used in our series: propofol (n = 8 in group D, n = 8 in group R), local anesthetics (n = 15 in group D, n = 8 in group R), tramadol (n = 1 in group D), and metoclopramide (n = 1 in group D). Hemodynamic complications occurred in 5 procedures, but no direct association was found between these events and the use of the drugs listed above. CONCLUSIONS: Major adverse events related to the deleterious effects of drugs recommended to be avoided were not detected in our series of patients with or at risk of BrS. Although authors cannot refute the theoretical risk of major adverse advents when using known or potential BrS triggers, the true clinical risk of these drugs is unknown, and recommendations to avoid their use should be better supported.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; OBSERVATIONAL STUDY
Name of substance:0 (Analgesics, Opioid); 0 (Anesthetics); 0 (Anesthetics, Intravenous); 39J1LGJ30J (Tramadol); L4YEB44I46 (Metoclopramide); YI7VU623SF (Propofol)


  6 / 4684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
PMID:28137634
Author:Arpaci AH; Isik B; Ilhan E; Erdem E
Address:Assistant Professor, Anesthesiology and Reanimation Specialist, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry, Ankara University, Ankara, Turkey. Electronic address: handarpaci@yahoo.com.
Title:Association of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting Incidence With Neutrophil-Lymphocyte Ratio in Ambulatory Maxillofacial Surgery.
Source:J Oral Maxillofac Surg; 75(7):1367-1371, 2017 Jul.
ISSN:1531-5053
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:PURPOSE: Postoperative nausea and vomiting (PONV) constitutes an important factor in ambulatory surgery. The mechanisms of the antiemetic action of potent anti-inflammatory corticosteroids, which are used extensively for the treatment of PONV, as well as the association between PONV and inflammation, have not been investigated sufficiently. We aimed to establish the association between the neutrophil-lymphocyte ratio (NLR) and postoperative antiemetic administration, as well as to investigate whether the NLR would be a biomarker for PONV. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The anesthesia records of American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) physical status I or II patients who underwent ambulatory routine oral surgery under general anesthesia were evaluated after we obtained ethical approval from the faculty ethics committee. A 5-point scale was used to score PONV. Metoclopramide (Metpamid, Istanbul, Turkey) was used as the first choice in patients who had a PONV scale score of 1 or higher. Data regarding metoclopramide administration during extubation and discharge periods were analyzed. Sixty-four patients were randomized and enrolled in the study with an NLR less than 2 (group I, n = 37) or an NLR greater than 2 (group II, n = 27), and metoclopramide administration was evaluated in each case. The association between the NLR and metoclopramide administration was analyzed statistically by a descriptive statistical method in detecting frequencies; the χ test was used in comparison of the groups and the t test in independent groups. RESULTS: The metoclopramide administration frequency for PONV was 5.4% in group I and 96.3% in group II. The metoclopramide administration frequency in group II was statistically higher than that in group I (P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: We are of the opinion that the NLR can be easily calculated with data obtained from the complete blood count and could be a marker for PONV. Antiemetic prophylaxis could be given after evaluation of the NLR. However, we suggest that this result should be supported with further prospective studies using larger series.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Name of substance:0 (Antiemetics); L4YEB44I46 (Metoclopramide)


  7 / 4684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
PMID:28061898
Author:Tianyi FL; Agbor VN; Njim T
Address:Sub-Divisional hospital Mayo Darley, Mayo Darley, Cameroon.
Title:Metoclopramide induced acute dystonic reaction: a case report.
Source:BMC Res Notes; 10(1):32, 2017 Jan 07.
ISSN:1756-0500
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: Metoclopramide is a commonly used anti-emetic drug known to cause extrapyramidal symptoms as adverse effects, amongst which are dystonic reactions. These reactions are more frequent at high doses of metoclopramide, in female patients, children and adults less than 30 years of age. We hereby present the case of a 16 year old female who had dystonic reactions from metoclopramide, highlighting its unpredictable nature and the shortcomings of the management in resource-limited settings. CASE PRESENTATION: A 16 year old female Muslim from the Extreme North of Cameroon with no significant past history, was treated for severe malaria and associated refractory vomiting using intravenous quinine and metoclopramide respectively. She developed dystonic reactions after being administered her second dose of metoclopramide. The drug was discontinued and she was administered 8 mg of chlorpheniramine by mouth. Her symptoms resolved after 4 h. She was discharged 2 days later with no further complaints. CONCLUSIONS: Metoclopramide causes dystonic reactions which are often unpredictable and is frequently prescribed by health providers. This creates an environment of anxiety for the patient and the caregiver, and can result in life threatening consequences. Patients on metoclopramide should be monitored closely to detect these reactions early, and health facilities should be equipped to cope with the adverse effects before administration.
Publication type:CASE REPORTS; JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Antiemetics); 0 (Dopamine D2 Receptor Antagonists); L4YEB44I46 (Metoclopramide)


  8 / 4684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
PMID:28042152
Author:Lorenzutti AM; Martín-Flores M; Litterio NJ; Himelfarb MA; Invaldi SH; Zarazaga MP
Address:Cátedra de Farmacología y Toxicología, Facultad de Ciencias Agropecuarias, Universidad Católica de Córdoba, Argentina (Lorenzutti, Litterio, Himelfarb, Invaldi, Zarazaga); Department of Clinical Sciences, College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York, USA (Martin-Flores).
Title:A comparison between maropitant and metoclopramide for the prevention of morphine-induced nausea and vomiting in dogs.
Source:Can Vet J; 58(1):35-38, 2017 Jan.
ISSN:0008-5286
Country of publication:Canada
Language:eng
Abstract:Morphine is widely used as a preanesthetic agent in dogs, but it often produces signs of nausea and vomiting. Maropitant (MRP) and metoclopramide (MCP) prevent emesis attributable to the opioid agent apomorphine in dogs. We evaluated the antiemetic efficacy and the discomfort in response to SQ injection of MRP [1 mg/kg body weight (BW)], MCP (0.5 mg/kg BW), and normal saline (SAL; 0.1 mL/kg BW) administered to 63 dogs, 45 minutes prior to morphine (0.5 mg/kg BW) and acepromazine (0.05 mg/kg BW). Dogs were observed for signs of nausea (ptyalism, lip licking, and increased swallowing) and vomiting for 30 minutes after morphine/acepromazine. The incidence of emesis was 0% for MRP, 38% for MCP, and 71% for SAL ( < 0.001). The incidence of signs of nausea was not different between groups. Discomfort due to injection was higher after MRP (48%), than after MCP (9.8%) and SAL (4.8%) ( < 0.001).
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Name of substance:0 (Analgesics, Opioid); 0 (Antiemetics); 0 (Quinuclidines); 4XE2T9H4DH (maropitant); 76I7G6D29C (Morphine); L4YEB44I46 (Metoclopramide)


  9 / 4684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record next record last record
select
to print
Photocopy
Full text
PMID:27889366
Author:Avcu N; Dogan NÖ; Pekdemir M; Yaka E; Yilmaz S; Alyesil C; Akalin LE
Address:Department of Emergency Medicine, Bitlis State Hospital, Bitlis, Turkey.
Title:Intranasal Lidocaine in Acute Treatment of Migraine: A Randomized Controlled Trial.
Source:Ann Emerg Med; 69(6):743-751, 2017 Jun.
ISSN:1097-6760
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:STUDY OBJECTIVE: The study aims to evaluate the efficacy and safety of intranasal lidocaine administration for migraine treatment. METHODS: This single-center, double-blind, randomized, controlled trial was conducted in a tertiary care emergency department. Included patients met the migraine criteria of the International Headache Society. Patients were randomized to intranasal lidocaine or saline solution; all participants received 10 mg of intravenous metoclopramide. Patient pain intensity was assessed with an 11-point numeric rating scale score. The primary outcome measure was the change in pain scores at 15 minutes; secondary outcomes were changes in pain intensity after pain onset and need for rescue medication. RESULTS: Patients (n=162) were randomized into 2 groups with similar baseline migraine characteristics and numeric rating scale scores. The median reduction in numeric rating scale score at 15 minutes was 3 (interquartile range [IQR] 2 to 5) for the lidocaine group and 2 (IQR 1 to 4) for the saline solution group (median difference=1.0; 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 2.1). The reduction in pain score at 30 minutes was 4 (IQR 3 to 7) for the lidocaine group and 5 (IQR 2 to 7) for the saline solution group (median difference=1.0; 95% confidence interval 0.1 to 2.1). Need for rescue medication did not differ between the groups, and local irritation was the most common adverse event in the lidocaine group. CONCLUSION: Although intranasal lidocaine was found no more efficacious than normal saline solution in our study, future studies should focus on patients who present earlier after headache onset.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL
Name of substance:0 (Anesthetics, Local); 0 (Antiemetics); 98PI200987 (Lidocaine); L4YEB44I46 (Metoclopramide)


  10 / 4684 MEDLINE  
              first record previous record
select
to print
Photocopy
PMID:27861438
Author:Stoetzer C; Voelker M; Doll T; Heineke J; Wegner F; Leffler A
Address:From the Departments of *Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Medicine, †Cardiology and Angiology, and ‡Neurology, Hannover Medical School, Hannover, Germany.
Title:Cardiotoxic Antiemetics Metoclopramide and Domperidone Block Cardiac Voltage-Gated Na+ Channels.
Source:Anesth Analg; 124(1):52-60, 2017 Jan.
ISSN:1526-7598
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: Metoclopramide and domperidone are prokinetic and antiemetic substances often used in clinical practice. Although domperidone has a more favorable side effect profile and is considered the first-line agent, severe cardiac side effects were reported during the administration of both substances. Cardiac Na channels are common targets of therapeutics inducing cardiotoxicity. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate whether the differential cardiotoxicities of metoclopramide and domperidone correlate with the block of Na channels. METHODS: Effects of metoclopramide and domperidone on the human α-subunit Nav1.5 expressed in human embryonic kidney 293 cells and on Na currents in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes were investigated by means of whole-cell patch clamp recordings. RESULTS: Tonic block of resting Nav1.5 channels was more potent for domperidone (IC50 85 ± 25 µM; 95% confidence interval [CI], 36-134) compared with metoclopramide (IC50 458 ± 28 µM; 95% CI, 403-513). Both agents induced use-dependent block at 10 and 1 Hz, stabilized fast and slow inactivation, and delayed recovery from inactivation. However, metoclopramide induced considerably smaller effects compared with domperidone. Na currents in rat cardiomyocytes displayed tonic and use-dependent block by both substances, and in this system, domperidone (IC50 312 ± 15 µM; 95% CI, 22-602) and metoclopramide (IC50 250 ± 30 µM; 95% CI, 191-309) induced a similar degree of tonic block. CONCLUSIONS: Our data demonstrate that the clinically relevant cardiotoxicity of domperidone and metoclopramide corresponds to a rather potent and local anesthetic-like inhibition of cardiac Na channels including Nav1.5. These data suggest that Nav1.5 might be a hitherto unrecognized molecular mechanism of some cardiovascular side effects, for example, malignant arrhythmias of prokinetic and antiemetic agents.
Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Antiemetics); 0 (NAV1.5 Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel); 0 (SCN5A protein, human); 0 (Scn5a protein, rat); 0 (Voltage-Gated Sodium Channel Blockers); 5587267Z69 (Domperidone); 9NEZ333N27 (Sodium); L4YEB44I46 (Metoclopramide)



page 1 of 469 go to page                         
   


Refine the search
  Database : MEDLINE Advanced form   

    Search in field  
1  
2
3
 
           



Search engine: iAH v2.6 powered by WWWISIS

BIREME/PAHO/WHO - Latin American and Caribbean Center on Health Sciences Information