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PMID:29431320
Author:Kudaeva IV; Dyakovich OA; Masnavieva LB; Popkova OV; Abramatets EA
Title:[Features of the lipid exchange in workers employed in aluminium productions].
Source:Gig Sanit; 95(9):857-60, 2016.
ISSN:0016-9900
Country of publication:Russia (Federation)
Language:rus
Abstract:Aluminum production can be referred to the category of industries of the increased health hazard for the workers. During technological process of receiving aluminum the air of a working zone is polluted by a large number of harmful substances. Workers are exposed to the complex of toxicants possessing a polytropic impact on the body. The most significant consequences are violations of different types of metabolism in the organism, including lipid metabolism. The purpose of the study is the investigation of the state of lipid metabolism in persons working in the production of aluminum. The object of research was 108 male workers of aluminum production suffering from occupational pathology of airways. The group of comparison was consisted of 103 men, apparently healthy, not exposed to toxicants. There was determined the content of the total cholesterol (TC), high and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDLC and LDLC), triglycerides (TG), phospholipids (PL), atherogenic index (AI). Statistical processing was performed with the use of software «Statistica 6.0¼. There were established statistically significant differences of indices of lipid exchange in the persons occupied in aluminum production when related to the group of comparison. IA values in persons from the study group proved to be higher than in the comparison group, due to elevated levels of TC and LDLC. The TG and PL level was also higher. The values of IA, TC and TG in workers of aluminum production in more than 50% cases exceeded the reference values. The average concentration of HDL cholesterol in both groups did not differ, and was above the lower reference boundary. Established features of lipid metabolism in workers of aluminum allow us to suggest the distinction in mechanisms of developing proatherogenic disorders from previously established ones for workers exposed to other chemicals. One of the causes of the shaping of these disorders can be oxidative stress, which in turn serves as a response to the exposure of complex of toxic substances to workers.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:CPD4NFA903 (Aluminum)


  2 / 61143 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28459622
Author:Martinez CH; Murray S; Barr RG; Bleecker E; Bowler RP; Christenson SA; Comellas AP; Cooper CB; Couper D; Criner GJ; Curtis JL; Dransfield MT; Hansel NN; Hoffman EA; Kanner RE; Kleerup E; Krishnan JA; Lazarus SC; Leidy NK; O'Neal W; Martinez FJ; Paine R; Rennard SI; Tashkin DP; Woodruff PG; Han MK; Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD Study Investigators
Address:1 Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan.
Title:Respiratory Symptoms Items from the COPD Assessment Test Identify Ever-Smokers with Preserved Lung Function at Higher Risk for Poor Respiratory Outcomes. An Analysis of the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcome Measures in COPD Study Cohort.
Source:Ann Am Thorac Soc; 14(5):636-642, 2017 May.
ISSN:2325-6621
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:RATIONALE: Ever-smokers without airflow obstruction scores greater than or equal to 10 on the COPD Assessment Test (CAT) still have frequent acute respiratory disease events (exacerbation-like), impaired exercise capacity, and imaging abnormalities. Identification of these subjects could provide new opportunities for targeted interventions. OBJECTIVES: We hypothesized that the four respiratory-related items of the CAT might be useful for identifying such individuals, with discriminative ability similar to CAT, which is an eight-item questionnaire used to assess chronic obstructive pulmonary disease impact, including nonrespiratory questions, with scores ranging from 0 to 40. METHODS: We evaluated ever-smoker participants in the Subpopulations and Intermediate Outcomes in COPD Study without airflow obstruction (FEV /FVC ≥0.70; FVC above the lower limit of normal). Using the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, we compared responses to both CAT and the respiratory symptom-related CAT items (cough, phlegm, chest tightness, and breathlessness) and their associations with longitudinal exacerbations. We tested agreement between the two strategies (κ statistic), and we compared demographics, lung function, and symptoms among subjects identified as having high symptoms by each strategy. RESULTS: Among 880 ever-smokers with normal lung function (mean age, 61 yr; 52% women) and using a CAT cutpoint greater than or equal to 10, we classified 51.8% of individuals as having high symptoms, 15.3% of whom experienced at least one exacerbation during 1-year follow-up. After testing sensitivity and specificity of different scores for the first four questions to predict any 1-year follow-up exacerbation, we selected cutpoints of 0-6 as representing a low burden of symptoms versus scores of 7 or higher as representing a high burden of symptoms for all subsequent comparisons. The four respiratory-related items with cutpoint greater than or equal to 7 selected 45.8% participants, 15.6% of whom experienced at least one exacerbation during follow-up. The two strategies largely identified the same individuals (agreement, 88.5%; κ = 0.77; P < 0.001), and the proportions of high-symptoms subjects who had severe dyspnea were similar between CAT and the first four CAT questions (25.9% and 26.8%, respectively), as were the proportions reporting impaired quality of life (66.9% and 70.5%, respectively) and short walking distance (22.4% and 23.1%, respectively). There was no difference in area under the receiver operating characteristic curve to predict 1-year follow-up exacerbations (CAT score ≥10, 0.66; vs. four respiratory items from CAT ≥7 score, 0.65; P = 0.69). Subjects identified by either method also had more depression/anxiety symptoms, poor sleep quality, and greater fatigue. CONCLUSIONS: Four CAT items on respiratory symptoms identified high-risk symptomatic ever-smokers with preserved spirometry as well as the CAT did. These data suggest that simpler strategies can be developed to identify these high-risk individuals in primary care.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; MULTICENTER STUDY
Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers)


  3 / 61143 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28465277
Author:Gammon D; Strand M; Eng LS; Børøsund E; Varsi C; Ruland C
Address:Center for Shared Decision-Making and Collaborative Care Research, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
Title:Shifting Practices Toward Recovery-Oriented Care Through an E-Recovery Portal in Community Mental Health Care: A Mixed-Methods Exploratory Study.
Source:J Med Internet Res; 19(5):e145, 2017 May 02.
ISSN:1438-8871
Country of publication:Canada
Language:eng
Abstract:BACKGROUND: Mental health care is shifting from a primary focus on symptom reduction toward personal recovery-oriented care, especially for persons with long-term mental health care needs. Web-based portals may facilitate this shift, but little is known about how such tools are used or the role they may play in personal recovery. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to illustrate uses and experiences with the secure e-recovery portal "ReConnect" as an adjunct to ongoing community mental health care and explore its potential role in shifting practices toward recovery. METHODS: ReConnect was introduced into two Norwegian mental health care communities and used for 6 months. The aim was to support personal recovery and collaboration between service users and health care providers. Among inclusion criteria for participation were long-term care needs and at least one provider willing to interact with service users through ReConnect. The portal was designed to support ongoing collaboration as each service user-provider dyad/team found appropriate and consisted of (1) a toolbox of resources for articulating and working with recovery processes, such as status/goals/activities relative to life domains (eg, employment, social network, health), medications, network map, and exercises (eg, sleep hygiene, mindfulness); (2) messaging with providers who had partial access to toolbox content; and (3) a peer support forum. Quantitative data (ie, system log, questionnaires) were analyzed using descriptive statistics. Qualitative data (eg, focus groups, forum postings) are presented relative to four recovery-oriented practice domains: personally defined recovery, promoting citizenship, working relationships, and organizational commitment. RESULTS: Fifty-six participants (29 service users and 27 providers) made up 29 service user-provider dyads. Service users reported having 11 different mental health diagnoses, with a median 2 (range 1-7) diagnoses each. The 27 providers represented nine different professional backgrounds. The forum was the most frequently used module with 1870 visits and 542 postings. Service users' control over toolbox resources (eg, defining and working toward personal goals), coupled with peer support, activated service users in their personal recovery processes and in community engagement. Some providers (30%, 8/27) did not interact with service users through ReConnect. Dyads that used the portal resources did so in highly diverse ways, and participants reported needing more than 6 months to discover and adapt optimal uses relative to their individual and collaborative needs. CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of providers' portal use, service users' control over toolbox resources, coupled with peer support, offered an empowering common frame of reference that represented a shift toward recovery-oriented practices within communities. Although service users' autonomous use of the portal can eventually influence providers in the direction of recovery practices, a fundamental shift is unlikely without broader organizational commitments aligned with recovery principles (eg, quantified goals for service user involvement in care plans).
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE


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PMID:29386192
Author:Tu H; Wen CP; Tsai SP; Chow WH; Wen C; Ye Y; Zhao H; Tsai MK; Huang M; Dinney CP; Tsao CK; Wu X
Address:Department of Epidemiology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX, 77030, USA.
Title:Cancer risk associated with chronic diseases and disease markers: prospective cohort study.
Source:BMJ; 360:k134, 2018 01 31.
ISSN:1756-1833
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To assess the independent and joint associations of major chronic diseases and disease markers with cancer risk and to explore the benefit of physical activity in reducing the cancer risk associated with chronic diseases and disease markers. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Standard medical screening program in Taiwan. PARTICIPANTS: 405 878 participants, for whom cardiovascular disease markers (blood pressure, total cholesterol, and heart rate), diabetes, chronic kidney disease markers (proteinuria and glomerular filtration rate), pulmonary disease, and gouty arthritis marker (uric acid) were measured or diagnosed according to standard methods, were followed for an average of 8.7 years. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cancer incidence and cancer mortality. RESULTS: A statistically significantly increased risk of incident cancer was observed for the eight diseases and markers individually (except blood pressure and pulmonary disease), with adjusted hazard ratios ranging from 1.07 to 1.44. All eight diseases and markers were statistically significantly associated with risk of cancer death, with adjusted hazard ratios ranging from 1.12 to 1.70. Chronic disease risk scores summarizing the eight diseases and markers were positively associated with cancer risk in a dose-response manner, with the highest scores associated with a 2.21-fold (95% confidence interval 1.77-fold to 2.75-fold) and 4.00-fold (2.84-fold to 5.63-fold) higher cancer incidence and cancer mortality, respectively. High chronic disease risk scores were associated with substantial years of life lost, and the highest scores were associated with 13.3 years of life lost in men and 15.9 years of life lost in women. The population attributable fractions of cancer incidence or cancer mortality from the eight chronic diseases and markers together were comparable to those from five major lifestyle factors combined (cancer incidence: 20.5% 24.8%; cancer mortality: 38.9% 39.7%). Among physically active (versus inactive) participants, the increased cancer risk associated with chronic diseases and markers was attenuated by 48% for cancer incidence and 27% for cancer mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Chronic disease is an overlooked risk factor for cancer, as important as five major lifestyle factors combined. In this study, chronic diseases contributed to more than one fifth of the risk for incident cancer and more than one third of the risk for cancer death. Physical activity is associated with a nearly 40% reduction in the cancer risk associated with chronic diseases.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T
Name of substance:0 (Biomarkers)


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PMID:29386181
Author:Adelborg K; Szépligeti SK; Holland-Bill L; Ehrenstein V; Horváth-Puhó E; Henderson VW; Sørensen HT
Address:Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, Denmark kade@clin.au.dk.
Title:Migraine and risk of cardiovascular diseases: Danish population based matched cohort study.
Source:BMJ; 360:k96, 2018 01 31.
ISSN:1756-1833
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To examine the risks of myocardial infarction, stroke (ischaemic and haemorrhagic), peripheral artery disease, venous thromboembolism, atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter, and heart failure in patients with migraine and in a general population comparison cohort. DESIGN: Nationwide, population based cohort study. SETTING: All Danish hospitals and hospital outpatient clinics from 1995 to 2013. PARTICIPANTS: 51 032 patients with migraine and 510 320 people from the general population matched on age, sex, and calendar year. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comorbidity adjusted hazard ratios of cardiovascular outcomes based on Cox regression analysis. RESULTS: Higher absolute risks were observed among patients with incident migraine than in the general population across most outcomes and follow-up periods. After 19 years of follow-up, the cumulative incidences per 1000 people for the migraine cohort compared with the general population were 25 17 for myocardial infarction, 45 25 for ischaemic stroke, 11 6 for haemorrhagic stroke, 13 11 for peripheral artery disease, 27 18 for venous thromboembolism, 47 34 for atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter, and 19 18 for heart failure. Correspondingly, migraine was positively associated with myocardial infarction (adjusted hazard ratio 1.49, 95% confidence interval 1.36 to 1.64), ischaemic stroke (2.26, 2.11 to 2.41), and haemorrhagic stroke (1.94, 1.68 to 2.23), as well as venous thromboembolism (1.59, 1.45 to 1.74) and atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter (1.25, 1.16 to 1.36). No meaningful association was found with peripheral artery disease (adjusted hazard ratio 1.12, 0.96 to 1.30) or heart failure (1.04, 0.93 to 1.16). The associations, particularly for stroke outcomes, were stronger during the short term (0-1 years) after diagnosis than the long term (up to 19 years), in patients with aura than in those without aura, and in women than in men. In a subcohort of patients, the associations persisted after additional multivariable adjustment for body mass index and smoking. CONCLUSIONS: Migraine was associated with increased risks of myocardial infarction, ischaemic stroke, haemorrhagic stroke, venous thromboembolism, and atrial fibrillation or atrial flutter. Migraine may be an important risk factor for most cardiovascular diseases.
Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T


  6 / 61143 MEDLINE  
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PMID:29321194
Author:Seibert TM; Fan CC; Wang Y; Zuber V; Karunamuni R; Parsons JK; Eeles RA; Easton DF; Kote-Jarai Z; Al Olama AA; Garcia SB; Muir K; Grönberg H; Wiklund F; Aly M; Schleutker J; Sipeky C; Tammela TL; Nordestgaard BG; Nielsen SF; Weischer M; Bisbjerg R; Røder MA; Iversen P; Key TJ; Travis RC; Neal DE; Donovan JL; Hamdy FC; Pharoah P; Pashayan N; Khaw KT; Maier C; Vogel W; Luedeke M; Herkommer K; Kibel AS; Cybulski C; Wokolorczyk D; Kluzniak W; Cannon-Albright L; Brenner H; Cuk K; Saum KU; Park JY; Sellers TA; Slavov C; Kaneva R; Mitev V; Batra J; PRACTICAL Consortium*
Address:Center for Multimodal Imaging and Genetics, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, USA tseibert@ucsd.edu amdale@ucsd.edu.
Title:Polygenic hazard score to guide screening for aggressive prostate cancer: development and validation in large scale cohorts.
Source:BMJ; 360:j5757, 2018 01 10.
ISSN:1756-1833
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:OBJECTIVES: To develop and validate a genetic tool to predict age of onset of aggressive prostate cancer (PCa) and to guide decisions of who to screen and at what age. DESIGN: Analysis of genotype, PCa status, and age to select single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with diagnosis. These polymorphisms were incorporated into a survival analysis to estimate their effects on age at diagnosis of aggressive PCa (that is, not eligible for surveillance according to National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines; any of Gleason score ≥7, stage T3-T4, PSA (prostate specific antigen) concentration ≥10 ng/L, nodal metastasis, distant metastasis). The resulting polygenic hazard score is an assessment of individual genetic risk. The final model was applied to an independent dataset containing genotype and PSA screening data. The hazard score was calculated for these men to test prediction of survival free from PCa. SETTING: Multiple institutions that were members of international PRACTICAL consortium. PARTICIPANTS: All consortium participants of European ancestry with known age, PCa status, and quality assured custom (iCOGS) array genotype data. The development dataset comprised 31 747 men; the validation dataset comprised 6411 men. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Prediction with hazard score of age of onset of aggressive cancer in validation set. RESULTS: In the independent validation set, the hazard score calculated from 54 single nucleotide polymorphisms was a highly significant predictor of age at diagnosis of aggressive cancer (z=11.2, P<10 ). When men in the validation set with high scores (>98th centile) were compared with those with average scores (30th-70th centile), the hazard ratio for aggressive cancer was 2.9 (95% confidence interval 2.4 to 3.4). Inclusion of family history in a combined model did not improve prediction of onset of aggressive PCa (P=0.59), and polygenic hazard score performance remained high when family history was accounted for. Additionally, the positive predictive value of PSA screening for aggressive PCa was increased with increasing polygenic hazard score. CONCLUSIONS: Polygenic hazard scores can be used for personalised genetic risk estimates that can predict for age at onset of aggressive PCa.
Publication type:COMPARATIVE STUDY; JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T; RESEARCH SUPPORT, U.S. GOV'T, NON-P.H.S.
Name of substance:EC 3.4.21.- (Kallikreins); EC 3.4.21.- (kallikrein-related peptidase 3, human); EC 3.4.21.77 (Prostate-Specific Antigen)


  7 / 61143 MEDLINE  
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PMID:29321156
Author:Wang T; Heianza Y; Sun D; Huang T; Ma W; Rimm EB; Manson JE; Hu FB; Willett WC; Qi L
Address:Department of Epidemiology, School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Tulane University, New Orleans, LA 70112, USA.
Title:Improving adherence to healthy dietary patterns, genetic risk, and long term weight gain: gene-diet interaction analysis in two prospective cohort studies.
Source:BMJ; 360:j5644, 2018 01 10.
ISSN:1756-1833
Country of publication:England
Language:eng
Abstract:OBJECTIVE: To investigate whether improving adherence to healthy dietary patterns interacts with the genetic predisposition to obesity in relation to long term changes in body mass index and body weight. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. SETTING: Health professionals in the United States. PARTICIPANTS: 8828 women from the Nurses' Health Study and 5218 men from the Health Professionals Follow-up Study. EXPOSURE: Genetic predisposition score was calculated on the basis of 77 variants associated with body mass index. Dietary patterns were assessed by the Alternate Healthy Eating Index 2010 (AHEI-2010), Dietary Approach to Stop Hypertension (DASH), and Alternate Mediterranean Diet (AMED). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Five repeated measurements of four year changes in body mass index and body weight over follow-up (1986 to 2006). RESULTS: During a 20 year follow-up, genetic association with change in body mass index was significantly attenuated with increasing adherence to the AHEI-2010 in the Nurses' Health Study (P=0.001 for interaction) and Health Professionals Follow-up Study (P=0.005 for interaction). In the combined cohorts, four year changes in body mass index per 10 risk allele increment were 0.07 (SE 0.02) among participants with decreased AHEI-2010 score and -0.01 (0.02) among those with increased AHEI-2010 score, corresponding to 0.16 (0.05) kg versus -0.02 (0.05) kg weight change every four years (P<0.001 for interaction). Viewed differently, changes in body mass index per 1 SD increment of AHEI-2010 score were -0.12 (0.01), -0.14 (0.01), and -0.18 (0.01) (weight change: -0.35 (0.03), -0.36 (0.04), and -0.50 (0.04) kg) among participants with low, intermediate, and high genetic risk, respectively. Similar interaction was also found for DASH but not for AMED. CONCLUSIONS: These data indicate that improving adherence to healthy dietary patterns could attenuate the genetic association with weight gain. Moreover, the beneficial effect of improved diet quality on weight management was particularly pronounced in people at high genetic risk for obesity.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, N.I.H., EXTRAMURAL; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T


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PMID:29179820
Author:Penno SJ; Hamilton B; Petrakis M
Address:St. Vincent's Hospital (Melbourne), Mental Health Service, Melbourne, Australia.
Title:Early Intervention in Psychosis: Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) Outcomes From a Five-Year Prospective Study.
Source:Arch Psychiatr Nurs; 31(6):553-560, 2017 12.
ISSN:1532-8228
Country of publication:United States
Language:eng
Abstract:INTRODUCTION: Over the last two decades, mental health services internationally have shifted towards intervening early in psychosis. The critical period for intervention is estimated to be five-years and many specialised programs target early psychosis. AIM/QUESTION: This prospective cohort study aimed to evaluate five-year outcomes from an early psychosis program (EPP) that adopted an integrated model, providing nursing and multidisciplinary community mental healthcare to clients aged 16-65years, beyond the typical age range of 16-25years. METHOD: We examined one routine outcome measure, the Health of the Nation Outcome Scales (HoNOS) across episodes of care for clients receiving EPP over a 5year period (n=239), comparing these results with HoNOS outcomes in an Australian national dataset for all public mental health clients. RESULTS: HoNOS improvements were highly significant from intake to discharge and from review to discharge for EPP clients, and these compared well with national outcome performance. CONCLUSION: There is potential for mental health nurses and other clinicians to significantly improve client symptoms and functioning, in a model of early psychosis treatment beyond a youth focus.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE; RESEARCH SUPPORT, NON-U.S. GOV'T


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PMID:28461531
Author:Ogdie A; de Wit M; Callis Duffin K; Campbell W; Chau J; Coates LC; Eder L; Elmamoun M; FitzGerald O; Gladman DD; Goel N; James J; Kalyoncu U; Latella J; Lindsay C; Mease PJ; O'Sullivan D; Steinkoenig I; Strand V; Tillett W; Orbai AM
Address:From Medicine and Epidemiology, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; QuintilesIMS, Denver, Colorado; Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina; Rheumatology Research, Swedish Medical Center; Un
Title:Defining Outcome Measures for Psoriatic Arthritis: A Report from the GRAPPA-OMERACT Working Group.
Source:J Rheumatol; 44(5):697-700, 2017 May.
ISSN:0315-162X
Country of publication:Canada
Language:eng
Abstract:The Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis (GRAPPA)-Outcome Measures in Rheumatology (OMERACT) Psoriatic Arthritis (PsA) Core Set working group recently published the updated 2016 psoriatic arthritis (PsA) core domain set, a set of disease features that should be measured in all clinical trials. At the GRAPPA annual meeting in July 2016, the PsA working group presented the updated PsA core domain set endorsed by 90% of participants at OMERACT in May 2016 and drafted a roadmap for the development of the PsA core outcome measurement set. In this manuscript, we review the development process of the PsA core domain set and the ongoing and proposed work streams for development of a PsA core measurement set.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Antirheumatic Agents)


  10 / 61143 MEDLINE  
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PMID:28461532
Author:Callis Duffin K; Gottlieb AB; Merola JF; Latella J; Garg A; Armstrong AW
Address:From the University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah; New York Medical College, Valhalla; Hofstra Northwell School of Medicine, Hempstead, New York; Department of Dermatology and Medicine, Division of Rheumatology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts; Internation
Title:Defining Outcome Measures for Psoriasis: The IDEOM Report from the GRAPPA 2016 Annual Meeting.
Source:J Rheumatol; 44(5):701-702, 2017 May.
ISSN:0315-162X
Country of publication:Canada
Language:eng
Abstract:The International Dermatology Outcome Measures (IDEOM) psoriasis working group was established to develop core domains and measurements sets for psoriasis clinical trials and ultimately clinical practice. At the 2016 annual meeting of the Group for Research and Assessment of Psoriasis and Psoriatic Arthritis, the IDEOM psoriasis group presented an overview of its progress toward developing this psoriasis core domain set. First, it summarized the February 2016 meeting of all involved with the IDEOM, highlighting patient and payer perspectives on outcome measures. Second, the group presented an overview of the consensus process for developing the core domain set for psoriasis, including previous literature reviews, nominal group exercises, and meeting discussions. Future plans include the development of working groups to review candidate measures for at least 2 of the domains, including primary pathophysiologic manifestations and patient-reported outcomes, and Delphi surveys to gain consensus on the final psoriasis core domain set.
Publication type:JOURNAL ARTICLE
Name of substance:0 (Dermatologic Agents)



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